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Full text of "Walton Advertiser"



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A Modern ly-tquipped Weekly Newspaper — Letter Press and Offset Printing Phone: 485-4962 



Serving A Progressive Community — Boone, Kenton, Grant & Gallatin Counties 



10c Copy 



Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 1 



W-Y Bearcats Lose 
3 of 4 Games Played 



Ludlow Trims Bearcats, 71-56 

The Ludlow Panthers tuned up for 
their title defense in the Ludlow 
Invitational Tournament by polishing 
off a good Walton-Verona team, 71- 
56, December 21, in Ludlow. 

The Panthers in winning their fifth 
game in six outings closed out the 
night'sl play with a 25-point fourth 
period that ended whatever hopes the 
Bearcats had for victory. Although the 
'Cats never got out front, they made 
a battle of it all the way until the 
final period. 

Reeves led the Panther attack with 
20 points. Caple add*"d 18, and Alig 
15. Rick Goldsberry and Bobby 
Messmer led Walton-Verona in scor- 
ing with 13 points each. Ronnie 
Huffman added ii. 

The Ludlow reserves won the first 
game by a 52-37 score over W-V. 

'Cats Take Beeclrwood In Tourney 

A 26-point third period enabled 
Walton-Verona to beat off a pesky 
Beechwood team and go on to a 78-51 
victory in the first round of the Lud- 
low Invitational Tourney on Tuesday, 
Dec. 29. 

The Beechies, trailing by only five 
points at the half, were outscored by 
17 in the period to drop out of con- 
tention. 

Rick Goldsberry led the winners 
with 18 points, while Mike Ferguson 
added 17, Ronnie Huffman 16, and 
Gary Ingram 10. Mark Robinson led 
Beechwood with 24 points. 

The same evening, Ludlow came 
through with a 62-60 win over Pendle- 
ton County. 

Bearcats Lose In Semifinals 

A 10-foot jump-shot with seven 
seconds left broke a tie and gave the 
Ludlow Panthers, a 58-56 win over 
Walton-Verona in the lower bracket 
semifinals of the Ludlow tourney, on 
Wednesday night of last week. 

Walton had broken a first'half tie 
with 19 points in the third period 
with Gary Ingram leading the way. 
Jon Alig led the Panthers with 18 
points and Mike Caple added 13. 
Ronnie Huffman led W-V with 15, 
while Ferguson added 12, and Gold- 
berry 10. 

W-V led 16-15 at the end of the 
first period, the score was tied at 28- 
28 at halftime, the locals led at the 
end of three periods, 47-42, but the 
wianers outscored Walton 16-9 in the 
final period. 

Dayton Smothers Bearcats 

In the Ludlow Invitational Basket- 
ball Tournament, last Thursday night, 
the! Dayton Greendevils smothered the 
Bearcats, 101-77, in the consolation 

5e. 
Jin the championship affair, Mays- 
Vvilje defeated Ludlow, 71-48, to win 
the meet. 

In the Dayton-Walton game, it was 
the second time in the meet the 
'Devils had gone over the century 
mark. Dayton's Frank Boyers led all 
scorers N in the game with 28 points. 
Herald added 25, Johnson 19, and 
Fletcher 17, for the victors. Top man 
for W-V was Huffman, with 20, Ing- 
ram had 17, Ferguson 13, and Sar- 
gent 12. 

Social at Independence 

The Independence Volunteer Fire 
Department Ladies' Auxiliary will hold 
it monthly social on Saturday, Jan. 9, 
starting at 8:30 p. m., in the Fire 
House. 

Mrs. Jackie Gripshover, who is 
chairman, would like to invite every- 
one to attend and to bring along a 



friend. Mrs. Sandy Huesman is in 
charge of refreshments. 

The Auxiliary would like to wish 
everyone a Happy and Prosperous New 
Y«ar, 



MARCH OF DIMES 
MONTH PROCLAIMED 

Gov. Louie B. Nunn has proclaim- 
ed January as March of Dimes Month 
in Kentucky. 

P rasing the National Foundation- 
March of Dimes for their campaign to 
guarantee every newborn American 
child a birthright of good health, the 
governor urged all Kentuckians to join 
in a generous support of the March 
of Dimes program. 

Due to the generosity of millions 
of Americans, more than 100 March 
of Dimes Birth Defects Centers have 
been established for research into the 
prevention and treatment of congeni- 
tal diseases. 

Although signifcant progress has 
been made in both prevention and 
treatment of these dread maladies, 
much still remains to be done if some 
250,000 newborns annually are to be 
spared the scourge of birth defects. 

RECEIVES PROMOTION 

John D. Fields, 116 McCullum 
Road, Independence, has been pro- 
moted to Chief Switchman in the 
Plant Department of Cincnniati Bell. 
He will be working in the Coviington 
office. __ 

Fields, a native of Alexandria, join- 
ed the telephone company in 1954 as 
a splicer helper. He has been work- 
ing as a swtchman for the past 14 
years. ^ 

He and his wife, Shirley, and their 
three sons and a daughter, have been 
living in Independence for 12 years. 

Church League 
Basketball Results 

In the first game Saturday night, 
the Church of Christ defeated Rich- 
wood, 65-63. Lockard led the winners 
with 32 points, while 'Spilrman was 
tops for the losers with 24. 

In the second contest, the Weth- 
ington boys combined for 54 points 
as All Saints defeated St. Patrick, 81- 
80. Gary Wethington led with 20, 
Mike Wethington 19. Tom Code 17, 
and Bill Wethington 15. Bill Saal- 
field led St. Patrick with 37." 

The third game saw Walton Bap- 
tist defeat Walton Methodist, 94-85. 
Ron Brown led the Baptist with 26, 
Collins added 24, and Jim Bill Noe 
23. G. J. Poore. was tops for the 
Methodists with 26, and Royce added 
25 tallies. 

In the nightcap, Walton Christian 
came from behind to defeat Pmer, 70- 
67. Charles Holder led the winners 
with 27, and Jim Mullins added 21. 
Tom Cornelius was tops for Piner 
with 23, and Dunn added 15. 

This coming Saturday, the first con- 
test is at 5:30. as Walton Christian 
plays St. Cecilia; at 6:45, Hickory 
Grove goes against Richwood; at 8:00, 
New Bethel tangles with St. Patrick, 
and at 9:15, Walton Baptist plays All 
Saints. Come outl 

New Truck Dealership 

Robert R. Ringo, a man with 24 
years experience in all phases of the 
truck transportation business, will open 
Northern Kentucky's' new General 
Motors truck dealership on January 18. 

Called Trux, Inc., the new facilitary 
is located on Interstate 75 at Donald- 
son Road, six miles south of Cincin- 
nati. The company will sell and ser- 
vice the full line of GMC parts and 
trucks ranging from pick-ups to the 
powerful GMC Astros. TBe firm will 
also serve as the Northern Kentucky 
dealer for Dorsey Trailers. 

Trux, Inc., has an ad appearing in 
this issue of the Advertiser. 



Open House For Pastor 

Open House., will be held at the 
Im manuel Bap tist Church, 20th and 



V. 



Walton Homemakers 

The Walton Homemakers will meet 
on Friday, January 8 at 11 a. m. in 
the home of Mrs. Donald McMillian 
of 29 Chambers Avenue. 

The lesson will be taught by Mrs. 
Claude Buna, "Wool Yarn Pillows." 
Members are asked to brng tapestry 
needle, scissors and worsted yam to 
the meeting. 

All members are urged to be pres- 
ent. Visitors are welcome. 

Critte-fc^What an odd posture for 
the statue of a general." Sculptor— 
"It isn't my fault. I had the statue 
half finished when the committee 
decided it couldn't afford to put him 
on a horse." 



Madison, Covington, on Sunday, Jan. 
10, from 2:30 until 4:30 p. m., for 
the new pastor, Rev. Walter A. Isley. 
The reception is to give members of 
the church and other churches and 
friends an opportunity to meet and 
welcome Rev. and Mrs. Isley to North- 
ern Kentucky. 

Rev. Isley attended the Southern 
Baptist Theologcal Seminary, Louis- 
ville. For the past four years he has 
served as pastor of the Brooksville 
Baptist Church, Brooksville, Ky. He 
and his wife, Carolyn, have a daugh- 
ter, Kimberly. 

George Bernard Shaw once attend- 
ed a dull party where the hostess in- 
quired, "Are you enjoying yourself?" 
He replied, "Yes, but that's all I'm 
enjoying." 



Industrial Park 
Affects Economy 

The Northern Kentucky industrial 
park will play a growing role in the 
economy of the community as the tri- 
county area moves into 1971. 

A survey by the First National Bank 
and Trust Company, Covington, un* 
covered reports that additional conw 
panies are shortly expected to pur- 
chase land in the sprawling tract. 

In addition, current companies are 
anxious to obtain more acreage for 1 
expansion. The bank was informed 
that 60 per cent of the land has been 
sold. 

The activity of the industrial park 
foundation was only a part of the 
story released on the economic health 
of the community as the new year be- 
gan. 

The outlook is mixed, the survey 
shows, but with the good outweighing 
the bad. 

Retail sales, dollar-wise, were up as 
the year came to a close but higher 
costs have cut into profit margins. 
Auto sales, down 35 per cent during 
the past year, are expected to move 
higher as the industry prepares for a 
predicted good year. 

"Financial institutions report savings 
are returning to local banks. Home 
building reversed a trend as 1970 
came to a close. Tobacco sold at 
averages above last year but acreage 
cuts and then possibility of more to 
come dimmed the outlook. 

Tax collections, officials said, have 
been good but that report had an off- 
setting factor with cities and school 
districts facing financial problems 
brought about by increased demands 
for services. 

Two emerging industries were spot- 
ted as possible bright spots in the 
future of the area. There is an in- 
creased demand for mobile homes and 
mobile home parks for those who, for 
one reason or another, do not wtnt 
conventional housing. 

The convention business is the other 
new industry which may bring new 
dollars to the area. The construction 
of quality facilities is credited with 
this plus factor. However, the First 
Nationah survey also pointed out that 
conventions are booked years in ad- 
vance so the new dollars may be de- 
layed in arriving. 

Burley Mostly Sold 
Before Christmas 

Over 85 percent of Kentucky's 
projected burley tobacco poundage 
was sold before the holiday recess, 
according to figures released by the 
State Department of Agriculture. 

Volume on the state's markets \ 
during the pre-Christma auctions was 
over 327 million pounds, which 
brought farmers some $2366 million. 
The estimate for the total 1970 crop 
is 383.4 million pounds. 

Lexington's market led the way, 
with over 13.5 million pounds sold. 
Maysville was second, selling 5.3 mil- 
lion pounds. 

The Greensburg market sold for the 
highest session average, paying $73.43 
per hundred. 

Auction houses were "reopened on 
Wednesday, January 6. 

$6,000 Base For Teachers 

The Kentucky Education Association 
is working out a legislative package for 
1972 that would include a $6,000 
base salary for teachers with no ex- 
perience, a professional negotiation bill 
and other proposals, it is reported. 



CYF Entertains With 
A Christmas Dinner 

The CYF of the Walton Christian 
Church entertained with a Christmas- 
dinner Tuesday, December 22 for 
some special members of the congre- 
gation. After dinner songs were sung 
and old time reminiscences. 

Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Foster Guttridge, Mr. and Mrs. Rich- 
ard Howard, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. 
Marsh, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Bickers, 
Mr. and Mrs. Pascal Bush, Rev. and 
Mrs. A. J. Russell, Mesdames Edith 
Black, Pearl Fink, Ada Moore, Jane 
Sleet, Goldie Wood, Mae Jacobs, 
Savella Parker, Frederica Mann, Sara 
Brewster, Misses Elva Hughes, Rachel 
Acree, and Mary West, Tommy Grif- 
fin, and Tommy Black, and several of 
the CWF members. 

President Sends Greetings 

A birthday card from President and 
Mrs. Nixon was among the greetings 
that Dale M. Elkins, Walton, receiv- 
ed on his 93rd birthday, Monday, 
Dec. 28. Mr. Elkins was born in 
1877 in Wolfe County, Ky., and for 
the past seven years has made his 
home with a daughter, Mrs. Freddie 
Green of Plum Street. 

Ten of his 14 children are living, 
and he has many descendants down to 
the fifth generation (three great-great- 
grandchildren). Mr. Elkins is a cavalry 
veteran of the Spanish-American War, 
and was a fanner in Kentucky and 
Indiana before retirement. He still 
enjoys good health, Mrs. Green said. 

The Kenton County 
Garden Club Meets 

"All Through the House," was the 
theme used by Mrs,. Wesley Hall to 
decorate her home for the third an- 
nual Chrstmas party of the Kenton 
County Garden Club. 

Her mantel was ablaze with color 
on a Chrstmas tree form decorated 
with 25 handmade ornaments. Mr. 
Hall designed the tree frame 

A seamstress, Mrs. Hall used rem- 
nants of velvet an d satin and discard- 
ed beads and pearls to decorate styro 
form balls to add a sentimental accent 
to the holiday setting. 

An eye catcher in the dining room 
was an antique kerosene lamp accent- 
ed with snowed evergreens and red 
bow. An antique wooden bowl fill- 
ed with old ornaments emphasized a 
painting done by the Halls' daughter, 
Elaine, a senior at the Cincinnati Art 
Academy. 

During the Garden Club meeting, 
Mrs. Leontine Stephens, the program 
chairman, read legends of Christmas 
and the Christmas tree and the story 
of the birth of Jesus Christ aj written 
by Luke. 

Members displayed ornaments they 
had made at workshops during the 
year. 

Attending the meeting were: Mes- 
dames Chalmer Ballinger, Ralph 
Gouge, John Herron, Francys Keeney, 
Forrest Popp, Leontine Stephens, Wil- 
liam Straw, and Misses Elma Taylor 
and Alice Jane Williams. 

Wa-Na Club to Meet 

The Wa-Na Woman's Club will 
meet at the Walton Christian Church 
on Thursday, January 7th at 8:00 p. 
m. Hostesses will be Mrs. Nels 
Popham and Mrs. Jack Norris. Mem- 
bers please note change in meeting 
place. Be present, if possible. 

No man ever injured his eyesight 
by looking on the bright side of things. 



misty 



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UPON 7HEQBSBWWCBOF 
ilAWTHANTUerDO t 






ULH&P to Spend 
$7 Million In 1971 

The Union Light, Heat & Power 
Company plans to spend $7 million 
on construction projects in 1971 and 
$40 million in the next five years, to 
provide continued growth of reliable 
service, according to John Yeager, 
president. 

Construction of the new $1,000,000 
office building of ULH&P being built 
in Covington is progressing satisfact- 
orily. The new building is located on 
the South side of Fourth Street, be- 
tween Madison Ave and Russell St. 

All activties conducted at the 7th 
and Scott Streets office will be trans- 
ferred to the new building when it is 
finished. About 35 employees will be 
housed in the new structure. 

ULH&P has completed the con- 
struction of a Liquefied Natural Gas 
Plant at Erlanger, costing more than 
$1 million. The new plant makes it 
possible to furnish jpr service to re- 
mote areas. Dry Ridge and Critten- 
den are receiving gas service through 
LNG process. Gas pipelines have 
been extended to Glencoe. 

The electrical capacity of the Lima- 
burg Substation, Route 237, near 
Youell Road, will be Increased at a 
cost of $66,000. 

Work is continuing on a $1 mil- 
lion project to increase ihe capacity 
of an electric line from the Taylor 
Mill area to Walton, to 69,000 volts 
from its present 33,000 volts. This 
project involve the buildng of two 
new substations, one on Beaver Road, 
near 1-75, and the other on Route 16, 
South of Harris Pike, and the re- 
building of the Decoursey Substation, 
South of Latonia. 

It will cost the company about 
$750,000 in 1971 to relocate gas and 
electric facilities because of street and 
highway improvement work in North- 
em Kentucky. 

During the next five years, Mr. 
Yeager said, CG&E plans to spend 
about $725 million on construction 
projects, including $422 million for 
work on transmission facilities and 
power station projects that will near- 
ly double the company's present elec- 
tric generating capacity by 1976. The 
present capacity is 2,018,470 kilowatts. 

ULH&P taxes totaled $3 4 million 
in 1970. This included property taxes 
of $712,000, of which $373,000 was 
for schools. 

Jones To Teach 
Epistles of John 

Beginning Sunday, January 10 and 
continuing through January 13, Dr. 
George Jones, Executive Secretary of 
the Northern Kentucky Baptist As- 
sociation, will be teaching the Three 
Epistles of John at the New Banklick 
Baptist Church. 

You won't want to miss this great 
teacher, sent from God, as he opens 
the truths that abound in these great 
Epistles. The schedule follows: 

Sunday, 7:00-8:00 p. m. - Monday 
through Wednesday evening, 7:00- 
9:00. Bring your Bibles for this wfll 
be the only text book, unless you de- 
sire Study Court Credit, then you 
must read the Study Course Book, 
tie Letters of John," by William L. 
Hendricks, and attend every session. 

Make your plans now to attend 
every session and receive a great 
blessing as you begin 1971. 

Mother-Daughter Christmas 
Party Given at Twenhofel 

A Mother-Daughter Christmas party 
was given December 15 from 3:30 to 
4:30 p. m., in the school cafeteria, by 
the Twenhofel Junior High FHA. 

The party began with the opening 
ritual. - The off icer s presented the ad- 
visor, Mrs. Neely, with a beautiful 
corsage as a token of their apprecia- 
tion. Debbie Hutchinson, song lead- 
er, led the group in singing Christmas 
Carols. A skit, "How the Grinch 
Stole Christmas," was presented by 
some' of the FHA members. 

The recreation for the meeting was 
led by Kathy Mayne, recreation direc- 
tor. Refreshments were provided by 
the refreshment committee, and were 
served in the Home Ec room. — Re- 
porter 

The new clerk asked the Customer: 
Have you an account here, ma'am? 
"No," the lady replied, "but I would 
like to see the manager." The clerk 
took the customer to the manager's 
office and announced' A no account 
lady to see you, sir. 



Completes Basic Training 




Airman Robert W. Campbell 



Airman Robert W. Campbell, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Alan II . Campbell 
o Morning View, has completed basic 
training at Lackland AFB, Texas. He 
has been assigned to Sheppard AFB, 
Texas, for training in aircraft main- 
tenance. Airman Campbell is a 1969 
graduate of Dixie Heights High 
School. 

INDEPENDENCE POST 
OFFICE IS LOOTED 

Burglars chopped their way through 
an outside wall and looted the Inde- 
pendence Post Office early Monday. 

Loss was undetermined immediately. 

"They knocked the hingles off the 
safe but didn't get it open," said 
Lindo Foster, Independence police 
chief. 

Foster said the intruders had first 
attempted to enter through the roof 
of the cement block and brick struc- 
ture but were unsuccessful. 

Then they chopped through an out- 
ide wall into a restroom. 

Foster said the break-in was dis- 
r-oveded by Poster Robert X. West 
when he came to open at 6:15 a. m. 

Dinner Bell Is Stolen 

According to Chief James Callahan 
of the Kenton County Police, a din- 
ner bell was stolen from a post in the 
yard of Shirfie Elliott, 275 LLL High- 
way, Morning View. The incident 
was reported at 8:15 p m., Saturday, 
December 26. 

Mr. Elliott is a teacher at Simon 
Kenton High School. 

Census Bureau Gives 
Population of Cities 

The Census Bureau has released 
figures of cities in Northern Kentucky 
in 1970. It seems there may have 
been errors, in the count is some 
areas, but we give the figures we 
have. — 

The city with the largest percentage 
of growth in the past ten years was 
Independence, with a 477.3 percent 
increase, going from 309 in 1960 to 
1,784 in 1970. Taylor Mill had a 
large increase, 358.2 percent, going up 
from 710 in 1960 to 3,253 in 1970. 

Walton gained 17.7 percent, going 
from 1,530 in 1960, to 1,801 in 
1970. Florence was up 75.1 percent. 
In 1960, the population was 5,837, 
and in 1970, 11,457. However, it 
seems City officials think this should 
be higher. t 

Warsaw grew from 981 in 1960 to 
1,232 in 1970, an increase of 25.6 
percent. 

Crittenden went from 287 in 1960 
to 359 in 1970; Dry Ridge from 802 
to 1,100, and Williamstown upped 
its count from 1,611 to 2,063. 

HINSDALE INJURED 
IN AUTO ACCIDENT 

Kenton County. School Superintend- 
ent R. C. Hinsdale was injured in a 
Christmas weekend automobile acci- 
dent in Spartansburg, S. C, school 
officials report. * 

The injuries were quite serious, it is' 
said, and Mr. Hinsdale, j§Jujti»tensive 
care at Spartansburg «. rtferfff 'Hospital, SflF 
being treated for a back injury. The 
accident took place at an intersection 
when a car slammed into the car 
driven by Jimmy Hinsdale, son of 
the school head and his wife, Eliz- 
abeth. The car struck on the side 
where Mr. Hinsdale was sitting. 

The Hinsdales had gone to South 
Carolina to visit Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy 
Hinsdale, who reside near Sparta n- 
bufg: 

Mrs. Hinsdale was not with her 
husband and son at the time of the 
accident. 



Students Entertain PTA 

Students of Kenton Elementary 
School, under the direction of Miss 
Berna, music teacher, presented a 
Christmas program at the December 
meeting of the PTA. 

Following the program, there was a 
visit from Santa Claus who distributed 
treats to all children present. 

Home-baked Christmas goodies were 
featured at a bake sale sponsored by 
the PTA preceding the program. 

The secret of happness is not in 
doing what one likes, but in liking 
what one has to do. 



/* 



Thursday, January 7, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 



Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 ■ Second pass Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 
'. — Assistant Editor 
Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch. Foreign Rate, 6c Per Liae. 




Mr. and Mrs. Paul Simpson and 
Mrs. Mike Simpson have been vaca- 
tioning with Mike Simpson in Hawaii. 

Fred Stallard, manager of Northern 
Kentucky Sanitation, had the misfor- 
tune to fall recently and break an 
ankle. He is recuperating at home. 

Mark Roland, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Gene Roland, had chicken pox the 
past week. 

Wilford Beighle has been a patient 
in Booth Hospital, but returned to 
his home on Bracht-Piner Road, last 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Rosenstiel 
spent Christmas Eve with Mr. and 
Mrs. Donald Stephenson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Wallace had 
as Christmas Eve guests, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Lancaster and daughters. 

Robert Arlinghaus of the U. S. 
Army, spent Christmas with Mr. and 
Mrs. R. L. Bumettc of Verona Road. 

Miss Eva Roberts has returned to 
Woodspoint, after having spent some 
time in the hospital with a broken*, 
hip. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Simpson 
entertained on New Year's Eve for 
Mr. and Mrs. Ward Sleet of Charles- 
town, Ind., Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Roter of Beaver, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Sleet and Miss Joella Sleet, Walton, 
and Mrs. Wardlyn Hyden and daugh, 
ter of Columbus, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward Rice, Florence, 
entertained on Monday after Christ- 
mas for Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Coppage, 
Mr. and Mrs. Chester Sturgeon, Mr. 
and Mrs. Rodney Coppage, Miss Bet- 
sy Coppage, Mrs. Isabelle. Robbins, 
Mike and Rick Rice. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Sturgeon 
entertained Christmas Eve for Mr. 
and Mr»r - 6arl Alexander and family, 
Mr. and Mrs\ Chester Sturgeon, Mr. 
and Mrs. DanW CJjapman and two 
daughters, Mrs. Donna, Sturgeon and 
son, Paul, and Mr. anchMis, Robert 
Moore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Sturge 
visited Mrs. Isabelle Robbins of Flor- 
ence, one day last week. Other guests 
were Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Trego of 
Florida. 



Tuesday night, Mr. and Mrs. Chest- 
er Sturgeon visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Clarence Vest of Verona. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Clacken and 
family of St. Louis, Mo., spent the 
holidays here with their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Glacken of Critten- 
den, and Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 
Oliver of Piner. 

Guy Carlisle was recently struck by 
a car, breaking his arm and severely 
injuring his leg. He returned home 
from St. Elizabeth Hospital, Christmas 
Eve. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward Sleet of 
Charlestown, Ind., and Mrs. Wardlyn 
Hyden and daughter, Kelly Ann, of 
Columbus, Ind., spent a couple of 
days last week with Mr. and Mrs. 
Malcolm Smpson. 

Mr. ar.d Mrs. James Allphin and 
Mrs. Larry Allphin have received word 
that Larry Allphin has arrived in 
Vietnam. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Allen enter- 
tained Christmas Eve for Mr. and 
Mrs. Jim Stone and family, Mrs. Dora 
Fields, Don, Ray and Paul Allen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sleet had as 
Christmas Day guests, Mr. and Mrs. 
Raymond Roter and Miss Joella Sleet 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carlisle en 
tertained for Christmas dinner, Mr. 
and Mrs. Guy Carlisle, Misses Christy 
and Connie Carlisle, and Ricky Golds- 
berry. 

Roscoe and Joann Denney cf EKU, 
Richmond, spent the holidays here 
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Roscoe Denney, and family. 

Miss Judy Shields of MSU, More- 
head, spent the holidays with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Shields 
of Jones Road. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Chapman and 
daughters of Franklin Lakes, N. J., 
spent Christmas here with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Sturgeon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Jones and 
daughter, Evelyn, of Hilliard, Ohio, 
spejitChrisrmas with relatives in Wal- 
aruTVerona. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul West of Flor- 
ence, called on Mrs. Ruth Smith one 
day recently.' 



New Year Bargain! 

WANT 16 ACRES with woods, water, and gas? Call 
on this. Located in Walton. 

WATCH FOR BIG AUCTION— To be advertised 
next week, in cooperation with Col. Cecil Way- 
man, auctioneer. 



Gayle 

McElroy 

Realty 

33 Alto Visto Drive 

Walton, Kentucky 
Phone: 485-4297 




■c\ 



Rev. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Lemons 
and daughter of Georgia, spent the 
Christmas holidays with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lemons of 
Walton-Nicholson Road. 

Mrs. Ruth Smith of Walton, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Smith of Lud- 
low, were Christmas Day guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mason of Ludlow. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Noe enter- 
tained on Sunday for dinner, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Noe and family of Louis- 
ville, Jim Bill Noe and daughter of 
Florence, Mrs. Eva Waters and Mr. 
Ruth Smith of Walton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Robinson of 
Erlanger, were Christmas Day guests 
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. "Bud" 
Robinson, and sons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Sturgeon and 
Mrs. Don Sturgeon were happy to 
receive a" call from Don Sturgeon on 
New Year's Day from Korea. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanford Hutton en- 
tertained for New Year's Eve dinner 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Bonta of 
Petersburg. 

Sympathy is extended to Mrs. Bea 
Carey in the death of her brother, 
Harmon Devine, of Ludlow. Services 
were held Monday in Ludlow. 

Mrs. Shirley Lou Cook and child- 
ren spent the past week with Mr. and 
Mrs. William Bertram and daughter 
of Winchester, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Cleveland and 
children Smyrna, Ga., visited Mrs. 
Cleveland's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Scott, Sr., of Verona, over New 
Year's. They were to visit the Grand 
Ole Opry in Nashville, on their return 
trip. 

Mrs. Dan W. Bedinger spent 
Christmas and New Year's with Mr. 
and Mrs. Wadsworth Latimer of 
Williamstown. She also attended a 
six o'clock dinner at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Denver Dunn of Wil- 
liamstown, the occasion being the 40th 
wedding anniversary of the Larimers 
and also the anniversary of the Dunns. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Lawrence and 
sons spent New Year's with Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Lawrence of Blooming- 
ton, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Beach of 
Dry Ridge, were calling on her cousin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Wilson, last 
Thursday. 

Miss Linda Grant, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. "Cotton" Grant, was home 
for the Christmas holidays after under- 
going minor surgery in West Virginia 
at the hospital where she is employed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Brewster enter- 
tained the Walton-Verona High 
School cheerleaders Friday night with 
a pajama party. 

Mrs. Bill Rorer, Mrs. Kathy King 
and son, Todd, of Cynthiana, were the 
Saturday guests of Mr. and Mr. Law- 
rence Wilson. 

Mr. and Mr. Lawrence Wilson 
entertained with a family turkey din- 
ner Christmas Eve. Those enjoying 
the evening were Mr. and Mr. Pat 
King and son, William Todd, and 
Mr. and. Mrs. William Rorer of Cyn 
thiana. 

We extend sympathy to Leon Hall 
and family in the loss of his wife, 
Teresa Hall. 

Mr. and Mrs. "Dyke" Vest and 
sons, Mickey and Tommy, of Louis- 
ville, were Christmas guests of her 
parents, Mr. and Mr. Marvin Ken- 
dall. 

Mr. and Mr. Wesley Burgess and 
son, Timmy, were New Year's Day 
guests of their son and wife, Mr. 
and Mr. "Rusty" Burgess. 

Mr. and Mr. Elwood Ruf and 
family and Mr. and Mr. Gene 
Roland and son were New Year's Day 
dinner guests of Mr. and Mr. Norman 
Hammond of High School Court. 

Mr. and Mr. Marvn Hudson and 
daughter visited his mother, Mrs. 
Lucile Hudson, during the Christmas 
holidays. 

Miss Thelma Moore of Cincinnati, 
spent the holidays with her mother, 
Mrs. Ada Moore. 




COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERVICE! 

Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for You— 

Nie's Pharmacy 

LLL Highway between Independence and Nicholson 



Mr. and Mr Charles Smith and 
children have moved from Crittenden, 
to the Shelby Kendall property on 
South Main. 

Mr. and Mr. Ray Brewster spent 
the Christmas holidays with Mr. and 
Mrs. "Chuck" Smith and daughter, 
Julie, of Detroit, Mich. 

Mr. and Mr. James Wayne Smith 
and son, Steve, of Norfolk, Va., spent 
the holidays with his parents, Mr. 
and Mr. Jimmy Smith, of South 
Main. Their other son, Jimmy, is in 
training with the Aij Corps in Texas. 

Mr. and Mr. Andy Penn entertain- 
ed on Christmas Day, William Rob- 
erts, Larry and Cathy Roberts, Mr. 
and Mrs. Dan Roberts, Mr. Nannie 
Lee Siekman of Hebron, and Mr. and 
Mr. Gene Penn and children. 

Mr. and Mr. Bob Hall, Mr. and 
Mr. Tom Johnson and Mr. and Mr. 
Bfll Smith visited Mr. and Mr. Dyke 
Vest in Louisville, recently, and at- 
tended the Kentucky-Notre Dame 
basketball game. 

Mr* and Mrs,. Cliff Ryan entertain- 
ed with open house New Year's Day, 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenny Dixon, Mr. and 
Mrs. Dan Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
B. Johnson, and Mr. and Mr. Cotton 
Grant and daughter, Linda. 

Mr. and Mr. Hen^ Fornash and 
son of London, Ky., were holiday 
guests of her parents, Mr. and Mr. 
Roy McCubbin. 

Mr. and Mr. Bill Smith and fam- 
ily entertained his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jimmy Smith, with a turkey din- 
ner on New Year's Day. 

Mr. Mable Johnson and daughter. 
Petty, and Mr. and Mr. Kaye Kelly 
and children were Christmas guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Fiske of Nichol- 
son. 

Mr. and Mr. William. Kidwell and 
family entertained for Christmas din- 
ner, Mr. and Mr. Jay Dyer, Mary 
Ann Portwood, Paul Dyer, and Dallas 
Burchett. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Stahl and 
daughter, Diane, of Covington, had 
as Christmas Day guests, Mr. and 
Mr. Victor Huff, Mrs. Goldie Wood 
and Tommy Black. 

Mr, and Mr. Melvin Utley, Doug 
and Sharon, were Christmas Day din- 
ner guests of Mr. and Mr. Denny 
Lusby and family of Warsaw. 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Mobley, Mr. 
and Mr. Donnie Afterkirk, Mr. and 
Mr. David Afterkirk, Mr. and Mr. 
Joe Afterkirk were Christmas Day 
dinner guests of Mr. Frances After- 
kirk and son, Jeff. 

Mr. Viola Roberts was the Sunday 
guest of her daughter, Mrs. Artery 
Penn, and Mr. Penn. 

We wish to express our sympathy 
to Mr. and Mr. Sam Mosley in the 
death of their new-bom twin sons. 

Mr. Susie Stamper, who has been 
on the sick list, is better at this time. 

Mr. and Mr. Frank Watts, Jeff 
and Connie, were Monday night din 
ner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Emmet 
Ward and son, Dean. 

Mr. and Mr. Norman Hammond 
entertained New Year's Eve with a 
turkey dinner for Mr. and Mrs. Orlie 
Jones and family of Corinth, Mr. and 
Mrs. Elwood Ruf and family, and 
Mr. and Mr. Gene Roland and son. 

The Happy HelpeR Class of the 
Walton United Methodist Church will 
meet January 12 at 7:30 p. m., in 
the church. 

The Eastern Star will meet Mon- 
day evening, Jan. 18 at 7:30. This is 
the regular meeting night. All mem- 
bers try to be present. 

Miss Connie Ruf was the Friday 
night guest of Kim Kidwell. 

Mrs. Wesley Burgess, Mrs. Lil 
Young, Mrs. Lee Naive, Mr. Melvin 
Utley and Mr. Mary Alice Kidwell 
were Sunday guests of Mrs. Edith 
Hamilton and Mrs. Mary Stephenson. 

Mr. and Mr. Charles Carlisle were 
the Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Malcolm Simpson at Heritage 
House, Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Wallace en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow 
Greene at Jim's Steak House, last 
Tuesday. They also visited Eden Park. 
It was the Greene's anniversary. 

Mr. Woodrow W. Greene spent 
Christmas and New Year's Day with 
Mr. and Mr. George Henry of War- 
saw. Mr. Greene joined her in the 
afternoon. 

Mr. and Mr. James Lawrence and 
sons spent Christmas Day with their 
parents in Owen • County. 

Rev. and Mrs. Charles Saylor arid 
son,- Brad, of Paducah, Ky., called on 
Mr. and Mrs. Fenton Hight and 
Ernie Hight one day last week. 

Mr. and Mr. J. R. Flynn entertain- 
ed on Christmas Day, Mr. and Mis. 
Jack Rouse, Mary Beth and Annette 
Rouse, Rick Perkins, Mr. Frances 
Stephens, Rick and Gisele Stephens, 
and Miss Vonda Noe. 

Mr. and Mr. Mel Scarth and 
daughter of EdwardsviHe, 111., were 
calling on Mr. and Mr. Richard 
Howard, last Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mr. Richard Howard spent 
Christmas Day with Mr. and Mrs. 
Naamon Cook of Mt. Zion. 

Miss Brenda Cook and Miss Mar- 
garet Ryan spent a few days with 
their grandparents, Mr. and Mr. 
Richard Howard. 

A/le Richard Clements of Castle 
Air Force Base, Calif., spent the hol- 
idays here with his parents, Mr. and 
Mr. Lloyd Clements. 



Eastern Star Meets 

The Eastern Star held its regular 
meeting Monday evening with a tur- 
key dinner. The Worthy Matron, 
Mr. Pearl Curtis, had charge of the 
business session. 

Members were glad to welcome as 
visitoR, Mrs. Sue McClellan, Deputy 
Grand Matron; Mr. Marabelle Van- 
aRdal, Mr. Gladys Creamer, Mr. 
Nancy Vanardsdol and Joe McClellan. 

Those who enjoyed the meal were: 
Mr. Pearl Curtis, Wayne Rice, Mr. 
Ruth Glenn, Mr. Edith Hamilton, 
Mr. Margaret Fields, Mr. Bessie 
McGuire, Lester McGuire, Bill Napier, 
Mr. Flo Napier, Mr. Mary Stephen- 
son, Mr. Mary Bailey, Mr. Dora 
Stephenson, William Roberts, Mr. 
Iolene Scott, Mr. Loretta Ashcrait, 
Billy Susan Napier, Miss Nancy Van 
aRdol, who entertained by twirling 
the baton and the burning fire act, 
which was very good. 

Christmas gifts were exchanged, and 
all left wish each a Merry Christmas 
and a Happy New Year. 

Mr. and Mr. Jesse Callen spent 
Christmas Day with their children at 
the home of Harold Banta and daugh- 
ter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Layne Cheesman and 
children had New Year's dinner with 
his uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Callen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Shutter of 
Latonia, and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dia- 
mond of Ft. Mitchell, were Sunday 
dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Callen. 

Mr. and Mr. Stanley Bush, Mr. 
and Mr. Gilbert Groger, Bob Callen 
of Indiana, Mr. and Mr. Harold 
Banta and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hargis Banta and son were all guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Callen during 
Christmas week. 

Mrs. Lee Naive and Mr. Ree Step- 
pier were Christmas Day guests of 
Mr. and Mr. Jimmy Naive and son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burgess and Mr. and 
Mr. Robert Horn enjoyed dinner and 
a show New Year's Eve in Cincinnati. 



Mr. and Mr. Frank Hess of Alex, 
Okla., spent the holidays with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Stuard, 
and Louise. 

We extend sympathy to the family 
of Mr. Lillie Chapman. 

Mr. and Mr. Wesley Burgess and" 
family and Mr. Susie Stamper enter- 
tained on Sunday for dinner, Mr. and" 
Mr. Mike Burgess, Rick Hemstedger 
of Cincinnati, Mr. Mary Stephenson,, 
and Hoard Johnson. 

New Year's Day guests of Mr. Lee 
Najve were Mr. and Mr. Ed Seisseger 
of Ft. Mitchell, Ed Seisseger, Jr. an<f 
children, Mr. Melvin Utley, Doug: 
and Sharon, Rev. Charles Dearing r 
Mr. Edith Hamilton, and Mr. Mary 
Stephenson. • Monday evening dinner 
guests in the Naive home were Mr, 
and Mr. Paul Theele and children r 
Dannie Theele of New Mexico, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gus Seisseger of Richardson 
Road, little Jimmy Naive, and Sonia 
Randell. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Horn, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wayne Denney and daugh- 
ter, Anna Maria, were Christmas Eve 
dinner guests of Mr. and Mr. Everett 
Bickers of ChambeR Ave. 

Christmas Eve dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mr. Joe Stephenson and sons, 
Todd and Shea, were Mr. S. J. Zapp 
and Mrs. Ammeree of Covington, Mrs. 
Edith Hamilton and Mr. Mary Step- 
henson. 

Mr. Melvin Utley and daughter, 
Sharon, were Friday guests of her 
brother and m family, Mr. and Mr. 
Carl Girdler of Crescent Springs. 

Mrs. Edith Hamilton and Mr. 
Mary Stephenson were Thursday night 
and Friday guests of Mr. Lee Naive 
of Banklick Road. 

Mrs. Lil Young entertained her 
grandchildren New YeaR Eve. They 
were Layna, Dayna, Nadine and Mary 
Cheesman. 

Mrs. Bruce Cox, Sr. and Mr. and 
Mr. Bruce Cox, Jr. and son, Gary, 
were Christmas Eve dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Burgess of South 
Main Street. 



Host Convenient for These Communities 



Walton 
Richwood 
Beaver Lick 
Big Bone 
Union 
Devon 
Crittenden 
Nicholson 



* • • 

Lighted 

Parking 

Lots 

• • * 



Fiskburg 
Morning View 
Kenton 
Staffordsburg 
Oak Ridge 
Whites Tower 
Independence 



Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 

45 North Main St., Walton 5619 Madison Pike, Independence 
Phone 485-4352 Phone 356-2675 



LOCATION— 4 Miles East of Owenton, Ky., on Highway No. 22 
(Taft Highway) near Sweet Owen Store— watch for Auction Signs. 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 9 - 10:30 A. M. 

14 ROOMS FURNITURE— ANTIQUE AND MODERN- 
TRUCK, TOOLS, AND MISCELLANEOUS 

Having purchased a new mobile home, completely furnished, I will sell 
the following: 2 living room suites, television and aerial, 2 radios, 2 
library tables (1 oak), large wool rug, 3 bedroom suites (1 oak), 2 large 
oak rocking chairs, 3 large odd chairs, wing-back chair, new piggy-back 
electric sweeper, 3 wool rugs, lot linoleum rugs, lot throw rugs, several 
odd dresseR and couches, oil heating stove, large electric cook stove, 
small electric cook stove, small wood cook stove, large Frigidaire refrig- 
erator, Maytag washer, 7-piece chrome dinette set, 5-piece wood break- 
fast set with dropleaf table, 9-piece dining room suite (china closet, 
buffet, table and 6 chairs), lot dishes, several antique china glass bowls, 
pitchers, preserve stand, vases, etc., dish safe, metal dish cabinets, tot 
cooking utensils, chest-type home freezer, couch-type day bed (makes 
full size bed), feather beds, pillows and bolsters, lot quilts and blankets, 
lot crochet and embroidery pieces, crocheted bed spreads and table 
cloths, lot linens, lot fancy pillows and bed dolls, lot mounted pieces 
(owls, birds, fish, squirrels, etc.), electric lamps, shell lamps, mail boxes. 

ANTIQUES— 3-piece bedroom suite (white marble-top dresser, white 
marble-top wash stand), white marble-top stand table, hall tree with 
mirror and umbrella stand, oil lamps, dishes and vases, 2 wash stands, 
small tables, picture frames, signed painting, spool-type platform rocker, 
round piano stool, 5-piece wash bowl and pitcher set (pink and white 
with flower design), 5-piece wash bowl and pitcher set (blue and white 
with iris flower design), willow rockers, bread trays (oval and round), 
2 mantle clocks, ox yoke, brass school bell, large farm dinner bell, roU- 
top writing desk, 3 love seats (2 with settee and chair to match, i odd 
settee), chest of drawers, quilting frames, names with brass knobs, cow 
bells, large and small stone jars, large and small itone churn, iroujcettles 
(oval and round), cider mill, straight chairs, flat irons, and manyorners, 
kneehole desk. 

FARM MACHINERY-Lard press, 2 com abetters, 2 corn grinders (1 
power operated), 2 water pumps, bee smoker, crosscut saw, tobacco bed 
seed sower, cutoff saw (mounts on tractor), grass seed sower (mounts 
on tractor), chain saw, new 550-gaL water tank, scalding box, grindstone, 
sheep shearing machine, 2 horse-drawn rakes, riding horse-drawn plow, 
horse cottars, lot walking plows, 2 yard benches, 2 large wooden chain, 
lot fruit ran, tot hand tools, pins many other items too numerous to 
mention. 

TRUCK-1946 model lV*-ton Chevrolet track, in good condition. 

AUCTIONEER'S NOTE-^All items are in good condition. 

Terms-Cash! Not Responsible for Accidental 

—Lunch Served by Ladies of the Pleasant Ridge Church— 

Mrs. Emmett Lee Harris, Owner 

Owenton, Ky., Route 4 Phone 484-3745 

PAUL NOEL & W, D. SULLIVAN, AUCTIONEERS 

Canouton, Ky.— Phone 732^721 Warsaw, Kv^-Phone 367-6331 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 7, 1971 



20 Years Ago . 



Thursday, January 4, 1951 
"WALTON— 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Vest are 
the proud parents of a baby daughter, 
born Sunday, Dec. 30 at Bethesda 
Hospital. She has been named Jane 
Cox Vest. 

J. B. McCubbin, who is stationed 
at Ellington, Texas, is spending the 



New Year's holidays here with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Roy McCubbin. 

Andrew Penn and daughter, Anda 
Lou, visited his parents at Hinton, 
during the holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Breeden of 
Verona Road, are rejoicing over the 
arrival of twin daughters, bom at St. 
Elizabeth Hospital, Dec. 24. 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1970-27- 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing Northwest Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interest of its citizens and the best interest of persons owning 
and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; said 
territory lying adjacent to the present northwest corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section 1. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 
£ity. 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, the point of inter- 
section of the North right-of-way line of Beaver Road with the East right-of- 
way line of 1-75; thence with the existing city limits for three calls; thence 
Easterly 1050 feet with the North right-of-way line of Beaver Road; thence 
Northwesterly 200 feet; thence Northwesterly 1640 feet, more or less, to the 
East right-of-way line of 1-75; thence South 1080 feet, more or less, with the 
East right-of-way line of 1-75 to the existing city limits; thence South 230 feet 
with the existing city limits to the beginning. 

Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there bata civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.00 and 81.230 of the Kerttflcy Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, tfelen there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall be- 
come a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a ' vote of 5 members of the Council on the 1 5th day 
^of December, 1970. » 

K. DALE STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 
ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 



AUCTION 

Next Sale January 8th - Open Daily 
BUTLER AUCTION HOUSE 

BUTLER, KENTUCKY .„ fHONE 472-2880 

Paint - Brushes - Rollers • New & Used Furniture • Stoves - Rugs 

CARL LANCASTER 

AUCTIONEER-BROKER 
We Conduct Private Saks - We Bay, Sell and Trade 



TRI-C0UNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING & REPAIR 

Trenching & Installation of Gas & Water Service 

824-6665 or 356-7477 



WALLPAPER 

FOY JOHNSON FINE PAINT 

Picture Frames - All Sizes 

WALL-TEX ART SUPPLIES 

LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 

264 MAIN STREET FLORENCE, KY. 

-—Parking In Rear — Phone 371-7921 — 



Accounts Insured 
To $20,000.00! 

WE PAY 

QUARTERLY 
INTEREST 

and the Highest 

Rates Allowable on 

the Following Accounts: 



f 




2-Year Certificates 

Per Annum 
$5000 Minimum 



6% 



12-Month Certificates 

Per Annum 

$1000 Minimum 



5 3 /4% 



6-Month Certificates 

Per Annum 

$1000 Minimum 



5V4% 



Pass 



Savings 
Per Annum 



5% 



R0SEDALE SAVINGS 



Caro line.fr Southern Avenues 

Phone 431-7723 



Covington, Ky! 



Miss Nina Eastern, who attends col- 
lege at Georgetown, has been enjoy- 
ing the holidays with relatives and 
friends here and at Blanchester, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. F. Young and 
daughters, Judy and Patsy, were the 
Sunday night guets of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Finnell. 

Mr. and Mrs. Powers Conrad, Mr. 
and Mrs. James W. Spencer, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wallace Grubbs, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mark M. Meadows, Miss Jeanctte 
Grubbs, Miss Sharon Graff, Tructt 
DeMoisey, and "Buddy" Grubbs were 
the Sunday evening dinner guests of 
Mrs. Aleen Conner of Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Praither had 
as weekend guests, Mr. and Mrs. 
Estel E. Hughes, Mr. and Mrs. Don- 
ald Austin, and Walter Hughes, all of 
St. Albana, W. Va., and Mr. and 
Mrs. Franklin Breeden and daughter, 
of South Charleston, W. Va. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Dealy and 
children of Dayton, Ohio, were the 
Chritmas day guests of Rev. and Mrs. 
G. W. Hoffman, and Dorothy. 

Charles B. Roberts spent part of 



his Christmas vacation with his aunt, 
Mrs. William Duchemin, and family 
of Portsmouth, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Stephenson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carlisle and 
Mr. and Mrs. "Nick Welsh were re- 
cently entertained by Mr. and Mrs. 
Ward Rice and son. 

Ronnie Cleek spent the holidays 
with his mother in Hamilton, Ohio. 

Miss Lena Kacaba visited her moth- 
er in Fairmount, W. Va., during the 
holidays. 
STAFFORDSBURG— 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Losey and 
sons, Ronald and J. B., spent Sunday- 
afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. Ncuman 
Armstrong. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Barnctt were the 
guests Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Clar- 
ence Barnett. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Kceney and 
son, Donald, were among the several 



guests of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Rector 
recently. 

BIG BONE— 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Kendall had as 
dinner guests on Christmas, Mr. and 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1970-29- 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing Westerly Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interests of its citizens and for the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present westerly corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section 1. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 
city. 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing West City Limits, said point being 
650 feet, more or less, Northerly from the intersection of the West City Limits 
with Kentucky Highway 16; thence Northwesterly with the projection of the 
common line of Parker and West and with said line 3850 feet, more or less, 
of sufficient to reach the rear lot line of Parker; thence Northeasterly with the 
rear line of Parker 1250 feet, more or less; thence Southeasterly with the north 
tract line of Parker 3170 feet, more or less, or sufficient ^.jeach the existing 
City Limits; thence Southwesterly with the existing City Limits 1360 feet, 
more or less, or sufficient to reach the beginning. 

Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.100 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon the passage thereof, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentueky ; and will be henceforth con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 5 members of the Council on the 15th day 
of December, 1970. 

A _ K. DALE STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 

ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1970-28- 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing North Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interest of its citizens and for the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present north corporate limits of the City 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, ^HE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, OKL.MNS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section 1. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 
city. 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, said point being in the 
West right-of-way line of U. S. 25 and being approximately 100 feet North of 
its intersection with Kentucky Highway 16; thence Northerly with the West 
right-of-way line of U. S. 25, 750 feet, more or less, to the line of Parker; 
thence Northwesterly with the line of Parker 3750 feet, more or less; thence 
Southwesterly with the line of West 350 feet, more or less, to the right-of-way 
of 1-75 northbound to 1-75 ramp; thence Southerly with the right-of-way of 
said ramp 3040 feet to the East right-of-way line of 1-75; thence Southerly with 
the right-of-way line of 1-75, 850-feet, more or less, to the existing City Limits; 
thence with the existing City Limits for four calls Easterly 1200 feet, more or 
less; thence Southeasterly 1250 feet, more or less; thence Northeasterly 1350 
feet, more or less; thence Southeasterly 760 feet, more or less, to the beginning. 

Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon the passage thereof, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by. a .vote of 5 members of the Council on the 15th day 
of December, 1970. 

K. DALE STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 

ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 

JCOLKENNER'SJ 

j Appliance Co. j 



[ 5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440: 
: ; 

[ SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS, S 
REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS, ETC. 

(Over 20 Years In the Service Business) 



BankAmcricard and Master Charge Honored 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG Cr COLEMAN GAS & OIL STOVES! 



Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a m. until 5 p. m. 



Mrs. James Webster, Sandy, Danny 
and Tommy, and Charles and Peggy 
Hon. 

Charles Hon of Big Bone spent last 
week with his grandmother, Mrs. 
Mable Hon, of Erlanger. 



ENGAGED 



Mr. and Mrs. Floyd G. Brown of 
Independence, announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Donna, to 
Larry O. Davis, son of Mr. and Mrs. 



Cecil O. Davis, of Hyde Park, Ohio. 
A June wedding is planned. 

THANKS EXPRESSED 

\ Thanks to the 7th and 8th grade 
students and teachers for the marvel- 
ous Christmas party given to three of 
the 2nd grade children, carrying out 
rlic theme, "IT IS MORE BLESSED 
TO GIVE THAN TO RECEIVE." 

BETTY ROTER 
SARAH SLEET 
2nd Grade Teachers 



VERONA AREA 




S5'/2 ACRES — Ryle Road; modern farm house, all of 
the ground is clean and in excellent grass, .96 to- 
bacco base, dairy equipment goes with farm, also 
silage fee4 $28,000.00. 

NEW BRICK, just 3 years old, 3-bedroom brick, family 
room with fireplace, two baths, 2-car garage, city 
water, lot 95x300; owner transferred, must sell. 

—LISTINGS NEEDED— 

TOM HODGE REA1TY 



VERONA, KY. 



PHONE 485-7362 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 9 - 10:00 A. M. 

At the farm of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Stamper, 
corner of Old Lexington Pike and Lemon-Northcutt 
Road, approximately 2 Miles North of Dry Ridge, Ky., 
Grant County. 

Mr, and Mrs. Stamper have decided to quit farming 
and will sell on above date all their stock, equipment, 
and farm (divided into 4 tracts). Here is a beautiful 
parcel of land, which lays exceptionally well with good 
frontage on two blacktop roads. 

Tract 1 — New 4-room modern frame home 3 years 
old, bath, utility room, oil furnace, built-in kitchen, city 
water in house; also with large combination feed and 
cattle barn, 2 ponds, good fence, with approximately 
32 acres facing on Lemon-Northcutt Road. 

Tract 2 — 2 acres at corner of Old Lexington Pike 
and Lemon-Northcutt Road. 

Tract 3 — 3 acres facing 350' on Old Lexington Pike. 

Tract 4 — Approximately 12 acres facing on Old 
Lexington Pike 792', with pond. 
Each tract will receive part of the .87 tobacco base. 

Farm will be sold in separate tracts and the right is 
reserved to group any two or all. 

. 28 HEAD OF HEREFORD & ANGUS CATTLE 

Hereford — 7 cows, 3 to 5 years old, one with calf' 
by side; registered Polled Hereford bull, 3 ! 2 years old; 
2 mixed, 5 years old, to calve in spring; 6-year-old, 
coming with fourth calf. 

Angus — 6-year-old, coming with fourth calf; 3 with 
first calf by side; 3 1 /2-year-old, coming with second 
calf; 5-year-old with calf by side; 2 5-year-old heavy 
springers; 2 2^2-year-old heavy springers; 7-months- 
old Angus bull. » 

Equipment & Tools— 1965 Massey-Ferguson diesel 
tractor with rear mower, 8' lift disk, set 14" plows (to 
be sold separately); Super A Farmall tractor with cul- 
tivators, plow, 5' mowing machine (to be sold separ- 
ately); 2 rubber-tired wagons, trailer, 5' bush hog, 
Woods corn picker, McCulloch chain saw, 5-ton chain 
hoist, bench vise, loose lumber, 500-gallon water tank, 
small tools, 2 aluminum gates (14' fir 16'), set chain 
booms, 2-corner steel porch post, 2-row corn planter, 
10' log chain, 8x12 tarpaulin, spool barb wire, woven 
wire, wood vise, tobacco press, fluorescent lights, con- 
crete mixing box; 1953 1 Vi-ton International truck 
with flat bed, Hollander tobacco setter, Dauheuser 
posthole digger, manure spreader, John Deere tractor 
with cultivators. 

Approximately 300 bushels corn, in crib. 

Approximately 1,000 bales of hay (some alfalfa). 

Furniture — 2-piece living room suite, coffee table, 
2 end tables, maple telephone stand, dinette set with 
6 chairs, 2 metal wall cabinets, 2 utility cabinets, util- 
ity table, Westinghouse refrigerator 3 years old, an- 
tique trunk, 3-piece bedroom suite with complete bed, 
odd dresser, stand table, Norge wringer washer, Kel- 
vinator electric range, Warm Morning coal stove. 

— Lunch On Grounds — 

Sale Conducted By 

COL CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

Realtors-Auctioneers-Appraisors 

4 East Southern Avenue Covington, Kentucky 

Main Street, Williamstown, Kentucky 

PHONE 431-4222 ANYTIME 

Auctioneers: Col. Wayman and Rel Wayman 

If You Have Anything To Sell— Call Us 1 



lUJHI 



Thursday, January 7, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 




SECTION <%m? 



Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mum charge of 50c for 25 words or 
less— over 25 words, 2 cents pei 
word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



For Sale— 



SEWING MACHINES — New 1970 
models, built in zig zag, makes 
buttonholes, sews on buttons, mends 
and darns; price reduced to $29.95 
cash price, or E-Z terms available. 
Before Inventory Sale. For free de- 
livery, call 559-4720. 2t-lc 

FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
dicsel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. tf-49'ic 

VACUUM CLEANERS— Tank ' type, 
with all regular cleaning tools, re- 
conditioned and runs good; $16.50 
cash price, or terms available. We'll 
deliver. Call 359-4720. 2Mc 

B ' 

F( )R SALE — 6-year-old Apaloosa mare, 
registered. Best offer. Telephone 
356-2363. 3t-52* 

SEWING MACHINE — Brand new 
1970 model does all fancy work, 
even writes names, simply turn lever 
and sew. Price reduced to $28.00 
cash price because of small scratches 
in shipping, or terms available. Call 
689-79-36. £ - 2Mc 

FOR SALE— Lard cans, 50-lb., 75c; 
plastic containers, 5-lb., 15c. Call 
356-3591. Janodo Restaurant. 

3t-51* 

VACUUM CLEANER^Paint damag- 
ed vacuum cleaners still in factory 
cartons, complete with all 7 cleaning 
tools. Reduced to $16.50 cash price 
or terms available. Call 689-7936. 

2t-lc 

FIGHT fatigue with Zippies, the great 
iron pill. Only $1.98 at Boone 
County Drugs. 4t-50* 

FOR SALE— 1956 Hotpoint refriger- 
ator, will majee a good second re- 
frigerator. Call 485-4613 after 3:30 
p. m. 2t-l* 

FOlt. SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Keadnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Kv. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE— 80-acre farm, 6/10 to- 
bacco base, combination bam; near 
Big Bone Park; no house. M&W 
Realty, 341-0239. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE— 1970 Road Runner, 383, 
335 horse power, 4-speed, yellow 
with black interior. $2,000.00. Call 
356-2363. 3t-52* 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE— 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kfftucky with factory-trained service- 
men On all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cash registers, 
• and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also carry 
ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. For free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. tf-8c 



FOR SALE— Angus bull. Telephone 
356-7354. 2t-lc 



FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



FOR SALE — Florence gas stove, 
kitchen table and 4 chairs. 30 High 
St. Walton, Ky. It lc 

POLE BARNS— 30x60 feet, 4>ne side 
open, $1,795.00; also. 1x30 feet, 
one side open, $1,195.00, If ready 
to build, call collect, Rcdwine Bros, 
at 606-824-4178. 5t-49c 

FOR SALE— Charolais bull. IVi years 
old; Sam, 951 bleeding. 485-7362. 
Tom Hodges. 2t-lc 

FOIV SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5-speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 

FOR SALE— Dresser with full length 
door mirror and drawers, in good 
condition, $10.00. 356-7380. lt-lc 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. - tf-42c 

FOR SALE— Straw, 90 cents a bale. 
3565306. lt-1* 

REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

FOR SALE— Laying hens, 50 cents 
each. 356-2538. 2t-lc 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-lOc 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing, 
all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 

249-A' Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. 34-t20* 

WOULD TRADE or SELL my three- 
year-old registered Hereford bull. 
Call 356-2182. 2t-52* 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impala Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone, 
Ky. tf-47 

FOR SALE — One white and apricot 
Poodle, house trained, and is seven 
months old, loves children. Phone 
485-4424. 2t-52* 



GOOD TIME GUARANTEE! 
Ebby Hoard of Midwestern Hayride 

APPEARING AT 

DON & JIM'S CLUB MOONLIGHT 

WITH THE EBB TIDES 



Every Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday! 

2325 Anderson Road, Crescent Springs, Ky. 341-4161 




Homelite Chain Saw Dealer 

NOW OPEN IN INDEPENDENCE 

CABER'S SERVICE CENTER 

Repairs Most Makes of Chain Saws & Small Engines 

Hand Saw Sharpening by Machine, Includes Setting 
and Oiling — Reasonable Rates 

—SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY— 

Open Monday thru Friday, 8 a. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 

5253 Madison Pike, Independence, Ky. 



— 




SEMI DRIVERS— Equal Opportunity 
— Experience helpful but not neces- 
sary, we want to train men our own 
way. Minimum age 21, good phy- 
sical condition. You can expect to 
earn well over $200.00 weekly, local 
or over the road. For application, 
write, Consolidated Systems, P. O. 
Box 40456, Indianapolis, Indiana, or 
call 317-784-1348. 2t-lc 

WANTED — Farms and country 
homes. Any condition, cash buyers* 
waiting. Free appraisal. Will come 
to your property at any time. Rel 
S. (Buck) Wayman, 356-5068. We 
specialise in the sale of farms and 
country homes. 6t-51c 

HELP WANTED— Full or part time. 
Men or women; unlimited oppor- 
tunity. 485-7560, 371-5023. 4t-l* 



Services — 



FOR SALE or TRADE-House with 
approximately 1 acre of land. Call 
485-4652. 4t-52* 

FOR SALE— Good mixed hay. Call 
356-2448. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE— Pigs, 2 months old. Call 
356-9964 after 4 p. m. 4t-51* 

FOR SALE— 1966 Chevrolet Impala 
4-door hardtop, 283, automatic. Call 
356-2758. 3t-51* 

FOR SALE— 1965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 



For Rent— 



TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 



FOR SALE— Black Angus heifer feed- 
er calves, 400 pounds or more. In- 
quire at O'Rourke Farm, on Jones 
Road, off High St., Walton. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE— 1966 Super Sport Chev- 
elle, V-8, 4-speed, bench seats, four 
chrome wheels, tach. Call 359-4669 
for information. 2t-l* 



FOR RENT— Three 2-room furnished 
apartments; 2 sleeping rooms; adults 
only. Call ater 5:00 p. m., 485- 
4536 or 485-7319. 85 North rvkin 

, St., Walton. tf-52c 

FOR RENT— Mobile home; adults. 
Call 493-5230. «2t-52c 

FOR RENT — Three-room unfurnish- 
ed apartment, city water, electric, 
presses, large porch, on 2nd floor, 
in Independencse. Call 356-2687. 

2t-l* 

FOR RENT— Five-room house with 
gas furnace, garage, and garden plot, 
at Piner. Call 356-6096. 2t-l* 

FOR RENT — Rural location, two- 
bedroom mobile home, electricity 
and water furnished; adults prefer- 
red; $20.00 per week. Telephone 
485-4422. 2t-lc 



Wanted 



NOTICE- 



NOTICE— Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 



EXTRA INCOME OPPORTUNITY 
— Reliable man or woman. No sell- 
ing. Refill and collect from new 
type coin-operated dispensers in your 
area. We secure locations. Must 
have car, references, $650 to $2200 
cash investment for equipment and 
inventory. Ten hours weekly can 
net excellent income. For personal 
interview, write, including phone 
number, to Lewman Industries, Inc., 
125 East Short St., Lexington, Ken- 
tucky 40507. lt-1* 



WANTED— Tenant for large farm; 
3.6 acres tobacco base; must have 
own equipment. Phone 485-4553. 
Mrs. J. C. Acree. lt-1* 

WANTED TO BUY-Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 

DRIVERS NEEDED— Train now to 
drive semi truck, local and over the 
road. Diesel or ga; experience help- 
ful but not necessary. You can earn 
over $4.50 per hour after short 
training. For application and inter- 
view, call 513-241-5572, or write 
Safety Dept., United Systems, Inc., 
c/o Motor Freight Terminal Bldg., 
3101 Gano Road, Sharonville, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 45241. 2t-lc 

WANTED— Cash for any kind of 
real estate, regardless of price or 
condition. Rel S. (Buck) Wayman, 
356-5068. tf-51c 



JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. tf-lc 

COLES BEAUTY SHOP —'Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 

LIVESTOCK HAULING — Robert 
Richardson, 356-6749 or 291-8370. 

16t-44* 

WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists, radios and stereos. 9:00 a. m. to 
6:00 p. m. Phone 485-7616. tf-46c 

DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf-29c 

SEPTIC TANKS-Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired, CISTERNS— Precast; sales 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 

ELOISE BEAUTY SALON— 125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permancnts a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS— For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC- 
IATION, 30Needmore St., Walton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 

CARD OF THANK$- 

I would like to thank those who 
sent the beautiful cards and flowers to 
me while I was in the hospital. Many 
thanks to my wonderful family for 
their many visits, and to the ministers 
who visited me regularly; also, thanks 
to Jimmy Grubbs for bringing me 
home from the hospital. May God 
bless each of you. 
lt-lc Mrs. Annabelle Stephenson 

TS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID' 



PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. tf-34c 

STEWART'S CUSTOM FARM 
WORK— Plowing, disking, grass 
seed sowing, mowing and baling 
hay, posthole digging. Call foi 
free estimate. Phone 356-5700 or 
356-9905. tf-13c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE- 
Now written tcr^everyone, if driv- 
ing record is good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington, Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cox 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m., 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600.' tf-38c 

LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON— Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
493-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO.- 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac- 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home- 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Oc 

BUILD UP ROOFING — Shingles, 
gutter work, patch work of all kinds. 
New roof warranty. Free estimates. 
Phone 356-9853 or 356-7100. 

20t-39* 

FASmONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, persona] 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed come to the "Fashionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 



YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER — In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines as 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoover 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Guard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 years in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00. tf-29c 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 

-■■ 



reeded? 



where did it go 



have a definite 
record of expense 



with a 




CHECKING ACCOUNT 




Dixie State Bank 

Walton, Ky. 



INTEREST j 
mrow 



Save by Mail! Phone 485-4121 

Interest Checks Mailed Semi -Annually 



Member T. D. I. C. 
Accounts inured fe> $2qpQQjQ0 



t 



Wolton Advertiser, Wolton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January l r 1971 




NEW YEAR SPECIALS 




Men's Button & Slip-On Sweaters, 
reg. values to 12.98 now $4.00 

Boys' Flannel Shirts Special 99c 

Short Sleeve Sweat Shirts, 
colors and white 



ItMIIIMIIMMMMIIIM 



$1.44 



Girls' Little Fur Muffs... only $2.00 

Girls' Sweaters % Off Reg. Price 65 M " Main Xl " Wa,,on ' Ky * 

— - ■ . 



u. ' 7- ii j iii in ,l t *. f,-,-, Teens Tam & Miflen Se on y $4.98 

Men s Zip Lined All Weather Coats now $7.77 . ., .„„.,,.,. „ 

Special All Girls Winter (oats 

Boys' Zip Lined All Weather Coats now $3.00 Reduced One-Third 

Ladies' Coats Reduced One-Third 

1 Group Ladies' Shifts only $2.00 

Reg. 4.98 Safin Bed Pillows $2.98 

Phone 485-4495 TojJ pj „ ows Specla | 99c to $1<9 g ^ 



Benton -Bonar 



BEAVER LICK 

Lorr Wilson is still in the hospital, 
and is beginning to show improve- 
ment. 

The Beaver Baptist Church had 
their Christmas program on Wednes- 
day evening. A large crowd attended, 
and it was enjoyed by all. After the 
entertainment, a treat of fruit and 
candy was had for all. 

Henry Black entered Good Samari- 
tan Hospital, Cincinnati, Wednesday, 
and underwent surgery Thursday. We 
all wish him much success in his 
surgery. 

Miss Sandy Stephenson is enjoying 
the Christmas holidays at home in 
Beaver. 

Everyone was sorry to hear of the 
death of Mrs. Leon Hall, and all ex- 
tend sympathy to the family. 



Mr. and Mrs. Albert Rosenstiel had 
their family in for Christmas dinner 
the Sunday before Christmas; also 
Mrs. Rosenstiel's sister, Mrs. Louise 
H Cope, of Walton. 

We have just learned that Henry 
Black is back home but in severe pain. 

Albert Rosenstiel, Elizabeth and 
Sandy Stephenson attended the funer- 
al of Elizabeth's cousin, Mrs. Leonard 
Noble, of Jackson, Saturday, Dec. 26. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alva Crouch spent 
Christmas with their daughter and 
son-in-law, Sue and Lon Murphy, in 
Covington. 

The New Year's Eve watch night 
service was another enjoyable occasion 
of the Beaver Baptist Church. A 
good crowd attended. 

Randall Rhodes and children have 
all been sick with a virus, but are 
better and up and around. 



DEFENSE 
APPROPRIATIONS 



5-ROOM HOUSE with bath, pantry, full basement, 
outside garage, lot 100x180, built-in kitfchen, storm 
doors and windows, large garden, oil furnace, sew- 
age tap-in has been paid; located on the Waljron- 
Nicholson Road. Price $15^25.00 

REEVES & DAY REAL ESTATE 

R. H. WORTHINGTON, SALESMAN— 823-7311 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 

U. S. Congressman 

4th District, Kentucky 

Earlier last month} the House took 
final action on the Defense Depart- 
ment Appropriation Bill for the cur- 
rent fiscal year. It provides for an 
appropriation of $66.6 billion. This is 
$2.1 billion less than the budget re- 
commendation. It "is less than pro- 
vided in any of the defense appropira- 
tion bills for the last three years. 

When the Conference Deport on 
this bill was before the House several 
members expressed their concern over 
the adequacy of the national defense, 
particularly as we loolrto the future. 
We share this concern We share the 






Wishing You 
A Prosperous 



NEW YEAR! 



From The Manager, 
Directors & Employees. 

(t §) Owen County Rural Electric Cooperative 




viewpoint by Congressman George 
Mahon, (D) of Texas, Chairman of 
the Appropriations Committee when, 
in response to a question he said: 

"If we are to maintain our military 
superiority, if we are going to avoid 
being outgunned strategically and 
otherwise, we are going to have to do 
more in certain areas of defense than 
we are doing in the pending bill. I 
would predict that unless the talks 
with the Soviet Union are fruitful 
that the next budget will have to be 
above this budget." 

Since the Nixon Adminitration as- 
sumed office in January of 1969, De- 
fense Secretary Laird has closed or re- 
duced operations at 849 bases. The 
number of civilian employees has 
been reduced by 271,000' and our 
armed forces reduced from a Vietnam 
War peak of 3.5 million to about 2.9 
million. There will no doubt be ad- 
ditional closing of bases and addition- 
al reductions in personnel. 

Defense expenditures are unpro 
ductive and not popular. Nonetheless, 
we must at all times look to our 
country's security. We dare not let 
down our guard. 

VERONA 

Flonnie Fdringtor., Reporter 

Mrs, AHie Chandler and Mrs. Ethel 
Pennington were six o'clock dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wil- 
son and daughter and Mrs. May Wil- 
son, last Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hughes spent 
Christmas Day with her mother, Mrs. 
Flonnie Edrington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Reed spent 
Saturday, Dec. 26, with their daugh- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Gary Hicks and 
children of Louisville. It was the first 
time they had seen their new grand- 
daughter, little Amy Denise. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Kemper spent 
Christmas with her sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Rouse of Bradenton, Fla. 

Mrs. Vevie Webster of Latonia, was 
calling on her sister-in-law, Mrs. 
Flonnie Edrington, Sunday afternoon. 
They called on Miss Blanch and Cor- 
inne McCormac. 

Mrs. Josephine Robinson, Tim 'and 
Lisa, Mr. and Mrs. David Mocker and 
children visited their mother, Mrs. 
Tilda Hocker, and mother of Berea, 
Ky., Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winfred Swearingin 
and children spent Christmas Day 
with her mother, Mrs. Allie Chandler. 

Those from our area who are in 
hospitals are Mrs. Dorothy Porter, 
Charles Richards and Stanley Overbay. 
and little Doug Barker. We wish them 
all a speedy recovery. 

Mr. ^nd Mrs. Charles Chipman 
were visiting his mother, Mrs. Helen 
Chipman, and other relatives during 
Christmas. 

We are glad to hear of Levi Pen- 
nington getting to come home from 
the hospital, but sorry he may have 
to go back in a few days. He has 
kidney stones. They are trying to get 
rid of them without an operation. 

Mrs. Ellena Hamilton and mother, 
Mrs. Flossie Greenwell, were calling 
on Flonnie Edrington, Friday. 

Mrs. Lillie Cooke was calling on 
Flonnie Edrington, Friday. 

The ladder of life is full ^bf splint- 
ers, but they always ptvi the hardest 
when we're sliding down. 



UNION 



Mrs. Mary K. Aylor and Mr. and 
Mrs. Jerry Aylor, Todd and Nita, were 
Christmas Eve guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. O. L. Black and Mrs. Bruce 
Ryle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Riddell and 
Mr. and Mrs Ronald Crnclle of Els 
mere and Florence, and Sam and 
Wayne Toole were Christmas dinner 
guests of Mrs. Frances Gruelle. Mild- 
red Grucllc and Bob Gallagcr of Rich- 
wood, called in the afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Billy Ryle, Peggy, 
Virginia, Buddy and Gary, of Louis- 
ville, spent Christmas weekend with 
his mother, Mrs. Bruce Ryle, and at- 
tended church at Burlingrpa^TJiex. 
also called on her brother, Don Jones, 
and other relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rick Bolger were the 
Christmas dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence McCane. The Bolgers 
are from Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Floyd and 
sons, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Floyd, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Floyd visited their 
father and grandfather, James Floyd, 
of London, Ky. James Floyd is 101 
years old and in good health, never 
having been sick more than a cold. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Houston had 
as dinner guests New Year's Day their 
three nephews and niece, Steve, Tim, 
Kenny and Becky Brenankcmp, of 
Butler. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Turner spent 
Chritmas Day with her mother, Mrs. 
Edna Craig, of Rosedale. 

Bro. and Mrs. Robert Ginn, Bobby 
Wayne, and Mr. and Mrs. Larry 
Noble and Susan spent Christmas with 
his and her parents of Amelia, Ohio, 
enjoying the eats at both places. Allen 
Ray Miller returned home with them- 
for the weekend. 

Christmas dinner guests of Mrs. 
Bruce Ryle and the O. L. Blacks were 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenny Aylor and son, 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Floyd and child- 
ren, Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Hankinson 



avd daughter. Callers were Miss Betsy 
Hendrickson and Rev. and Mrs. Bob 

Ginn. 

Congratulations to Dclana Eads and 
Scott Johnson, who were married on 
Dec. 28 at the Florence Christian 
Church. 

Cecil Dickerson, Jr. went to Hazard, 
Sunday to see his grandfather. Homer 
Osborn, who went to visit his son, 
Homer L. Osborn, and took sick while 
there. * 

Christmas holiday guests of the 
Warren Hustons and the Cecil Dick- 
ersons were Mrs. Rosic Ammerman, 
Mr. and Mrs. Melville Dickerson and 
Mr. and Mrs. Randy Antrobus of 
Falmouth. 

Congratulations to Mr. . and- Mrs. 
Walter Slimn on the arrival of a new 
grandson, named Jcffry Phillip Knauer. 
The father is in Vietnam. 

Sunday dinner guests of Mrs. Bruce 
Ryle were her daughter's family, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gerald Floyd, Shaun and 
StcvTe. Callers in the afternoon were 
Carl Hill and Eunice Brunker of Fal- 
mouth. 

j 

Moe: (jive me some acetylsalicylic 
acid. Pharmacist: Do you mean as- 
pirin? Moe: That's right. I can never 
thing of that name. 



JUDY DRIVE-IN 
THEATRE 

Taft Highway • Dry Ridge, Ky 
SHOW STARTS AT 7:20 P. M. 

Judy Drive-In 
will be closed 
this weekend! 



"THE SHOE SALE EVERYONE WAITS 
FOR" - TODAY - ALL THIS WEEK! 

Jim's Salon Shoes 



Designer Footwear, Handbags 



SEMI- 
ANNUAL 



CLEARANCE 



OF LADIES' FINE QUALITY FALL AND 
WINTER SHOES & HANDBAGS 

THIS IS THE MOST FANTASTIC SALE WE HAVE EVER 
HAD! THOUSANDS OF PAIRS, HUNDREDS OF STYLES 
FAMOUS NAME SHOES . . . AAAA TO B-4 to 10 ... ALL 
PRICED UNDER WHOLESALE. 



REGULARLY TO $22.00 

»™ $8.90 

MEDIUM *0 

HEE^S $10.90 



regularly to $38.00 
h™ $12 .9o 

MEDIUM t"° 

HEELS $14.90 



BROKEN SIZE TABLE 

$4.90 & $6.90 



CASUALS 

$6.90 to $10.90 



HUSH 
PUPPIES 

$6.90 

to 

$9.90 



4B 
SAMPLES 

$6.90 




FAMOUS BRAND CHILDREN'S SHOES 
FLORENCE ONLY 

-TWO LOCATIONS 



842 MONMOUTH ST. 7101 DIXIE HIGHWAY 

NEWPORT, KY. 261-2262 FLORENCE, KY. 571-7773 

Open Daily, 9:30 to 5:30; Friday 'til 9:00 P. M. 



"The Place To Go For Brands You Know" 

BankAmericard, Shoppers & Master Charge 



Thursday, January 7, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



«•••••■ 



LUMBER FOR SALE 

DAVIS SAW MILL & LUMBER YARD 

Now in operation in Gallatin County, on the Sayers- 
ville Road. Barn patterns and rough lumber of all 
kinds, now ready for your use, or 1,000 feet at reason- 
able prices. 
Day 567-5261 Warsaw, Ky. Night 567-2153 



LOSE DRIVER LICENSES 

Listed below are the names of in- 
dividuals who have lost their drivers 
license for the week ending Dec. 18, 
as- released by the Department of 
Public Safety to the Traffic Safety 
Coordinating Committee, Frankfort: 

BOONE COUNTY: WUliam R. 
Hutchinson, 24, Route 1, Union, six 



Attention Kenton County Taxpayers 

SPECIAL COLLECTION OFFICE 

INDEPENDENCE COURTHOUSE— Thursday, 9:00 a. m. to 3:00 
p. m. and Saturday, 9 a. m. to 12 noon. Please bring your Tax Bill. 

COVINGTON OFFICE— Monday through Friday, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 
p. m., Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 12:00 noon. 



JOSEPH L. N!E 



SHERIFF OF KENTON COUNTY 



COVINGTON, KY. 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 



Covington 



Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
P. H. A. and Mortgages! 



HELP WANTED 



Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to — 



BORON STOP 338 



1-75 & 338 



RICHWOOD, KY. 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 

Samples Shown In the Home 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED & INSURED 
—ACOUSTIC CEILINGS INSTALLED— 

M. SIMPSON - 341-7555 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
January 13th and January 27th. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County— George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County — Donald Conrad_824-6551 

Campbell County— Bruce Trapp 635-5129 

Kenton County— George Boch 356-6278 



B. C. & D. 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695* 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 



. 



■s».i 



| LIFE BEGINS WITH A HOME OF YOUR S 
I OWN. SEE FIRST 
I FEDERAL FOR 



3 THE LOAN. 




| ( tRSTi EDEPAL 

Savinqs <$:Loan Association 



s 

iriJl 



OF COVINGTON 
5th & Main Streets — Covington, Ky. 

ELSRRE, KY. LATONIA, KY. 

2715 Dixie Highway 36th & Decoursey Ave. 

DIXIE HIGHWAY— SOUTH OF WALTON 



: 

■ 

s 
s 




"OLD-TIME 
RELIGION" 



Lesson for January 10, 1971 




Background Scripture: Matthew 9:14 17; 
13:31 33, 51, 52; Mark 4:26-29. 

Bishop Gerald Kennedy on the 
United Methodist Church tells an 
old story of a hungry Arab, who, 
one night vin his tent, lighted a 
candle, and peeled open a date, 
to his dismay, there was a worm, 
so he threw it aside. A second 
j and third date al- 
so had worms. Ex- 
asperated, the 
Arab blew out the 
! candle and ate the 
| fourth date. 

"Rather than 
[face unpleasant 
realities," com- 
iments Bishop 
Kennedy, "we of- 
Rev. Althouse ten find it easier 
to stay with things as they are 
and hope for the best. It hardly 
ever works." 

"It's good enough for me" 

Many of us may be like the 
Arab: we do not like to face un- 
pleasant realities. One of the 
most unpleasant realities for 
Christians today are the rapid 
changes — sociological, techno.- 
logical, theological, moral, poli- 
tical — taking place in our world. 
They are unpleasant because they 
are challenging us to change and 
we do not want to change. It is 
not so strange, then, that many 
of us look back to the "good old 
days" and sing: "Give me tfcat old 
time religion . . . it's good enough 
for me." 

No doubt about it, the old-time 
religion was good. But what we 
forget is that what made it 
"good" was that in its own day 
it spoke to the needs of people 
where they were. Its genius was 
that It was not geared to some 
day gone by, but present circum- 
stances. Though it preserved the 
best of the past, it was not afraid 
to push on into the future with 
whatever new resources God 

would give. 

"We never did it that way 
before" 

JWjen we go back Into the Bi- 
ble we find that all the great mo- 
ments of spiritual history were 
regarded as "new-fangled" by 
people when they first appeared. 
Moses was often rejected by his 
people because he would intro- 
duce some "new thing" from God. 
It doesn't take too much imagin- 
ation to hear the people of Israel 
greet Moses down from Mount 
Sinai with the Ten Command- 
ments, saying: "But we never did 
it that way before!" 

It was the same story when Is- 
raelite leaders tried to unite the 
tribes into one unified nation, 
when David sought to build a 
temple, when prophets chal- 
lenged the people with their 
"new ideas." It was also this 
kind of resistance which gave 
Jesus so much opposition and 
which, indeed, brought about his 
death. His preaching and teach- 
ing were radically "new" and 
"different" and quite contrary to 
much that the rabbis held dear. 

Jesus tried to help them to un- 
derstand that his message was 
not really "new," but rather a 
contemporary interpretation of 
the eternal truth. No one, he 
said, "puts a piece of unshrunk 
cloth on an old garment, for the 
patch tears away from the gar- 
ment and a worse tear is made." 
The same is true in isping to 
pour new wine into old wine- 
skins. The fermentation of the 
new wine will burst the old, 
weakened material. 

Old wineskins 

The wineskins are the various 
forms in whieh we express our 
religion. They are our religious 
institutions, our style of church 
life, our form of worship, our 
mode of witness. These forms 
wear-out in time and the fresh- 
ness of the Gospel is always in 
danger of bursting them. The im- 
portant thing is not the wineskin, 
the form, but the eternal reality, 
the new wine. It is the Gospel, 
not our forms of expressing it, 
that is eternal. At one time it 
was normative to worship set 
ly in catacombs; today there is 
no need to do so. The important 
thing is that we worship, not 
where or how or when. 

(Bated on outlines copyrighted by th» 
Division of Christian Education, National 
Council of the Churches of Christ in the 
U.S.A. Released by Community Press 
Service.) 



months; Ralph E. Duncan, 24, 7481 
LeMore, Florence, until June 7, 1971; 
Daniel A. McManama, 23, 16 Ama- 
rillo Place, Florence, until Feb. 19, 
1971. 

KENTON COUNTY: Woodrow 
H. Menefee, 54, Elliott Road, De- « 
mossville, until June 7, 1971; Richard 
H. Campbell, 21, 5808 Taylor Miill 
Road, Covington, one year; Glenn P. 
Hyden, 22, flO Banklick Station, In, 
dependence, two years; James D. Holt, 
26, Richardson Road, Independence, 
six months. 

License lost for the week ending 
December 25, were: 

KENTON COUNTY: John Jasper, 
21, 614 Garvey Ave., Erlanger, six 
months; William G. Wilson, 24, 3920 
Lori Drive, Erlanger, six months; 
Dana A. Lenhof, 20, 559 Erlanger 
Road, Erlanger, until May 17, 1971; 
Jess H. Daniels, 22, 39 Sanders Dr., 
Florence, until June 14, 1971; Sam 
M. Samuels, 36, 536 Hallam Ave., 
Erlanger, six months. 

BOONE COUNTY: John E. Sex- 
ton, 23, 4 Fairview Court, Walton, 
until April 13, 1971; George S. Engle, 
32, 8473 Dixie Highway, Florence, 
until May 12, 1971; Robert E. Cum- 
mins, 33, 150 Coral Drive, Hebron, 
until April 22, 1971; David A. Lister, 
18, Route 1, Verona, until October 
21, 1972; Gary W. Fugate, 18,' Route 
1, Burlington, six months; Harold E. 
Darghty, 60, Beaver Road, Walton, 
until October 22, 1971; Charles R. 
Grubbs, 23, 751 Burlington Pike, 
Florence, until July 13, 1971; Barry 



G. Rehg, 19, 87 Colony Road, Flor- 
ence, until April 9, 1971. 

- ■-- -i i ii ii . .- 

Notes of Servicemen 

Navy Petty Officer Third Class 
George V. Schadler, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. George E. Schadler, 745 Hogrefe 
Road, Independence, is serving with 
Fighter Squadron 32 aboard the air- 
craft carrier USS John F. Kennedy, 
deployed to the Mediterranean. 

Jerry Marksberry, of Verona, spent 
the holidays in Houston, Texas, visit- 
ing his brothers and sisters. 
jl; 

Pvt. Jerry Shields of Ft. Leonard 
Wood, Mo., spent the holidays with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Shields, and family of Old Lexington 
Pike, Walton. 

Sp/4 Richard Gibson arrived home 
from Vietnam, December 25, for a 
furlough with family friends. He will 
leave soon for Germany, where he 
expect to spend seven months. 

Marine Corporal Larkin E. Mullins, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Mullins of 
886 Independence Station Road, In- 
dependence, was presented' the second 
through forty-second awards of the 
Air Medal while serving with the 
First Marine Air Wing in Vietnam. 

U. S. Air Force Staff Sergeant 
Franklin L. Lowe, son of Mrs. Mamie 
L. Anness, Richardson Road, Inde- 
pendence, is on duty at Binh Hhuy 



AB, Vietnam. 

Sgt. Lowe is a supply service tech- 
nician with a unit of the Pacific Air 
Forces. He previously served at Lawry 
AFB in Colorado. 

The sergeant's wife is the former 
Asako Suzuki from Japan. 

Don't permit yourself to show tem- 
per. Always remember that if you are 
right you can afford to keep your 
temper, and if you are wrong you 
cannot afford to lose it. — Reynolds 

Teacher: Johnny, construct a sen- 
tence using the word "archaic." 
Johnny: We can't hace archaic and 
eat it too? 



Candid Weddings 

Color & Block & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, Walton 
485-4046 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne — 635-2895 




Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pond 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation & Repair 

Precast Cisterns and 

Backhoe Work. 

356-5804 




Sunday 

• Hebrews 
11:3-6 

Monday 

• John 
14:23,27 

Tuesday 

• Proverbs 
3: J 9-34 

Wednesday 

• Proverbs 
8:17-35 

Thursday 

• Galatians 
6:1-10 

Friday 

• I John 
1:1-3 

Saturday 

• I John 
5:1-7 






Do you believe In the tremendous capabilities of man? 
Christians do . . . 

Do you, on the other hand, believe that man is quite 
helpless to overcome many of the forces that threaten his 
progress? Christians do . . . 

How can the same religion support such contradictory 
views ? 

Well, we take for granted that a tank-load of gasoline 
will propel an automobile many miles. But there are cold 
mornings when we can't even get the engine started. What 
is missing? 

A spark ! A continuing series of sparks I 
Never over-simplify the functioning of the human soul. 
Like the internal-combustion engine it can be powerless 
when denied the fire that unlocks its energy. 

To be himself — to be all that God intended him to be 
— • a man needs God. 

Bring your hopes and frustrations to church next Sun- 
day. 

Scriptures selected by the American Bible Society 



<jwr/ 



Copyright 1971 
Kelster Advertising Service, Inc., Strasburg, Virginia 



i s» <$& f<m9<$»/9<^^ m9<&*^m 



The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 



ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 

Phone 485-4600 North Main St, Walton 

BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PEOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

Phone 485-4898 Walton, Kentucky 

BENTON-BONAR DEPT. STORE 

Phone 485-4495 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phone 356-2172 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or 371-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Kentucky 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 356-3081 Nicholson, Kentucky 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

Phone 485-4121 Watt—, Kentucky 



HALL ELEC. & APPL. SERVICE 

Phone 485-4087 Walton, Kentucky 

MOTCH-JEWELERS 

613 Madison Avenue Covington, Kentucky 

READNOUR COAL & FEED 

Phone 485-4504 Walton, Kentucky 

ROBERTS INSURANCE, INC. 

485-4693 or 485-7262 Walton, Kentucky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ab" Ryan 485-4161 Walton, Ky. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 485-9111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 485-4962 "Tour Local Newspaper" 

WALTON HDW. & DRY GOODS 

Phone 485-4000 CUff Eyan, Prep. 

WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 

Phone 485-4163 Walton. Kentucky 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 7, 1971 



IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID IN ADVANCE? 

LEGAL NOTICE OF ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

Sealed proposals, in duplicate, will be received by the City of Walton, Office 
of City Clerk, City Building, Walton, Kentucky, until 12:00 noon, EST, 
TUESDAY, January 19, 1971, for furnishing all labor and materials necessary 
for the construction of project titiled 

NEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL,. 

PORTER ROAD NEAR HIGHWAY 14 

for 

WALTON-VERONA INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

Separate lump sum bids will be received on the following branches of the work: 

1. General Construction: Applicable sections of Division 1, and Divisions 
2 through 10 and Section 11-B. 

2. Kitchen Equipment: Applicable sections of Division 1, and Section 11-A. 

3. Classroom and Office Furnishing: Applicable sections of Division 1 and 
Division 12. 

4. Plumbing Work: Applicable sections of Divisions 1 and 15. 

5. Electric Work: Applicable sections of Divisions 1 and 16. 

All bids shall be in accordance with drawings and specifications, as prepared 
by Betz, Carey & Wright, Architects, 2616 Central Parkway, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 45214. 

The drawings and specifications are on file at the office of City Clerk, Walton, 
Kentucky, at the office of Architects, at the F. W. Dodge Corporation, Inc., 
2528 Kemper Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, and at the Allied Construction, Inc., 
1010 Yale Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Drawings and specifications may be obtained from the Architects by furnishing 
a deposit check of $50.00 per- set, check made payable to Betz, Carey & Wright, 
Architects. Each bidder on the major branches of the work may obtain two 
(2) sets. Deposits will be refunded to each bidder on the major branches of 
the work who submits a bonafide Bid Proposal and returns the drawings and 
specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after the opening of the 
Bid Proposals. The cost of reproduction, handling and mailing will be deducted 
from the deposits of all other sets not so returned. 

LEGAL NOTICE 
A Bid Bond or certified check in the amount of ten per cent (10%) of the 
amount of the bid shall accompany the proposal. If certified check, make pay- 
able to City of Walton, Kentucky. A Contract Performance and Payment 
Bond shall be provided by each contractor tp whom a contract for the work is 
awarded, on all contracts in excess of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00). Each 
Bond shall be in the amount equal to one hundred per cent (100%) of the 
contract sum. Bonds subject to approval of owner. Cost of Bond to be paid 
by the bidder. The City Council of Walton, Kentucky reserves the right to 
reject any and all bids and to waive information in bidding. Contracts will be 
awarded on the basis of the lowest responsible bid. Determination of awarding 
contracts will be made on basis of the Base Bid, combination of Base Bids, 
plus or minus any Alternates that may be accepted by the owner. The owner 
reserves the right to reject any and all Alternate Bids. 
2t-lc By: DAISY HILL, City Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 




NOTICE - NEED GUNS OR AMMO! 

Smith fir Wesson 38-cal., model 10, 4" & 5" barrel 
Smith & Wesson 38-cal., model 10, snub, 2" barrel 
Smith & Wesson, 38-caK, model 36, snub, 2" barrel 
Smith & Wesson, 32-cal., models 30 & 31, 3" barrel 
Ruger Super Single Six, 22-cal. with 22 mag. cyl., 
SVi" barrel. Also Many Other Guns 

—MILITARY TARGET AMMO— 

303 British, bright and clean _ $7.50 per 100 

7mm and 8 mm and 7-65 Mauser $7.00 per 100 

7-62 Russian _ $7.00 per 100 

45 Auto. Rem. manf $4.50 per box of 50 

Also Other Types of Ammunition 

CLEVELAND GUN SHOP 

805 Cox Road, Off Taylor Mill Road, 
Near Cherokee Shopping Center. Open Daily! 



Home 
Agent's 
Parly 
Line 

By 

Nancy Norman 

Faster living. Convenience foods. 
Shopping habits change. Why—and 
what's ahead? What are the "so- 
called" new trends? Look at the groc- 
ery carts these days. Processed pro- 
ducts crowd out most of the fresh 
lettuce, cucumbers and peppers — but 
what about the other vegetables? 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 
economists report that we use less 
tomatoes, onions and celery thdh we 
did 20 years ago. But, actually, the 
trend away from fresh vegetables is 
not really new. It started to decline 
in the late thirties and early forties. 
We stopped eating quite so many 
fresh peas and lima beans— then we 
stopped eating as many snap beans. 
In the fifties we didn't demand fresh 
cabbage in quantities as we used to 
—then we started picking up fewer 
bunches of carrots from the produce 
bins. 

We started the switch to frozen 
broccoli intead of fresh, then it was 
frozen brussels sprouts and cauliflower. 
New the trend is towards frozen ears 
of com— away from the fresh ones. 
Next the shift to frozen spinach and 
other green leafy vegetables. And so 
it goes. By 1969, canned or frozen 
items accounted for approximately 54 
percent of the total vegetable con- 
sumption. 

"Why the trend? What really en- 
courages housewives to switch to the 
frozen or canned lines and away from 
the familiar fresh-from-the-farm var 
ieties. Convenience is the numbei one 
factor. The demand for more services 
grows along with rising incomes. If 
Dad gets a pay raise, Mom doesn't 
put plain fresh spinach in the -grocery 
cart — no, she buys frozen spinach 
souffle. Mom may be out adding to 
the fanv'ly income too — she has less 
time, but usually more money— so 
she needs the convenience foods. 



ELECTRIC SEWER 
CLEANING 

Ditches dug with new trenching 
machine, 4 to 10 inches wide and 
up to 30 inches deep, only 35c 
per foot. Pre-Cast concrete cisterns 
installed, and cisterns and septic 
tanks cleaned. 

F. J. LUCAS SANITATION CO. 




356-2315 



THERE'S A 



BIG 6% 



IN YOUR 

FINANCIAL 

FUTURE! 



Good news! We've raised interest dividend 
rates as high as the law allows. Now, 
thanks to new Savings Certificate rates, 
your money can earn as much as 6%. 



%% 



$5,000 Deposit 
2 Year Term 
$1,000 Multiples 



'° $'!o 

lo/ " 

5% $ 6 ,j 



000 Deposit 

Year Term 

000 Multiples 



$1,000 Deposit 
" Months Term 
,000 Multiples 




the tint la Kentucky 



INSURED 



GENERAL 
SAVINGS 

the general savings and loan association, inc. 

6th St Madison, Covington, Ky. - 291-7219 4501 Dixie Highway, Elsmere, Ky., - Hl-4848 



>■# 



According to USDA's Economic Re- 
search Service the trend won't change 
but the pace of the shiftover will 
probably slow down because now most 
families have already shifted to con- 
ccnience lines. 



BIRTHS 




Born to Herman and Lora Hamil- 
ton, Route 2, Walton, a son, at 8:35 
a. m., December 21, at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Covington. 

Born to Maurice and Marilyn Vandt 
of Route 2, Walton, a son, at 6:06 
p. m., December 26, at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. 

Born, to Douglas and Linda Spiece 
of U. S. Highway 25, Walton, a 
daughter, at 8:34 a. m., December 27, 
at St. Elizabeth Hospital. 



COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
Vi ACRE 

—by — 
JOE CLAXON 



Only a few crops grow well on acid 
soils because they require calcium and 
magnesium which are replaced by ap- 
plications of agricultural limestone. 
This material not only corrects the 
soil acidity, but also supplies the plants 
with the needed calcium and frequent- 
ly magnesium. 

Soil pH, which is a measure of the 
acidity or alkalinity of- the soil, affects 
the availability of all elements which 
influence crop production An applica- 
tion of liming material to an acid 
oil increases the availability of plant 
nutrients which arc important to crop 
production. Among these are nitrogen, 
phosphate and others. Liming reduces 
luxury uptake of potash by the plants 
and reduces the availability of alumin- 
um and iron manganese which are 
harmful to plant if they are present 
in sufficient quantities in the soil. 
Liming also helps increase the num- 
ber and activity of beneficial soil bac- 
teria. It helps improve the physical 
condition of the soil by supplying the 
calcium needed by leguminous crops 
to increase their growth. It increases 
root development and permeability of 
the soil. 

Lime is the most economical factor 
involved in crop production on most 
soils in the humid areas, as they are 
acid in varying degrees. The applica- 
tion of needed fertilizers is also one 
of the most economical factors in crop 
production. The wise use of water — 
both rainfall and irrigation — is still an- 
other factor involving crop produc- 
tion. However, the one which is 
most frequently by-passed is the ap- 
plication of agricultural limestone and 
this is the first step in a sound fer- 
tility program on most soils in the 
humid area. Failure to apply this 
material limits crop production and 
wastes fertilizer dollars as well as the 
producer's capital investment and his 
labor in crop production. To get a 
better picture of soil needs, a soil 
test is recommended. Bring your soil 
samples to the Extension Office for a 
test. 

Jack: How long have you been 
working for the company? Mack: 
Ever since the boss threatened to fire 
me. 



mtmmtt-*% 




DISCOVER THE 

BIG DIFFERENCE 



1H I.OW-COST AUTO 
INSURANCE 

You do save money with our 
Special Budget Automobile 
Policy. What's more, you get 
quality protect/on and 
hometown agency service 
. . . service you can count 
on at all times. 

These phis benefits add up 
to a big difference for you. 

Call or write us today for 
full facts. 

J. B. JOHNSON 

93 North Main Street 

WALTON, rr. 

485-7102 



oSton 



ftEPRCSSvTINOi 

rOAClTOMOBILE MUTUAL 

/INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE* COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Two youngsters were walking home 
from Sunday school after having been 
taught a lesson about the devil. One 
of the boys said to the other: What 
do you think about all that devil 
stuff? The other thoughtfully re- 
plied: Well, you know how Santa 
Claus turned out. It's probably just 
your dad. - 




Lunsford Trucking-Blacktopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO LARGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 

MORNING VIEW, KY. 356-7527 - 359-4667 



Orbit Outlet Store 

CRITTENDEN, KENTUCKY HIGHWAY 1548 

1/2 Mile West of the 1-75 Exit 

NEW SHIPMENT OF CAPER-MATE SUITS 



20% Off On All Coats! 



NOTICE — Store Hours, Monday thru Saturday, 
9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Wanted: = 

Track ischanics 
to work 4 days a week. 

[and get paid for almost 5# J 

If you're a top-notch truck mechanic who 
really knows his stuff about all kinds of trucks, 
you'll work a 10-hour day, 4-day week at the 
roost modern shop in the area. 

What's more, you'll get paid for working 
more than an 8-hour day, 5-day week. 

Best of all, you'll have three full days off a 
week to do whatever you please. 

To even take a second job, if you like. 

What about the pay? It's tops in the industry. 

We've also got a lot of great fringe benefits 
to boot 

One more thing. Your standards must be 
high, because ours are. 

Call 331-J656 between 8 AM and 10 AM, 
before January 5. Call 342-8500 any time after 
January 5. 



TRUX, INC. 



Where the trucks are! 
Kentucky's newest, most up-to-date sales and service truck facility. 




Save On Admiral's Console Models 

20" Color TV Sale Price $410.00 

(Regular Price $460.00) 

24" Color TV ^ _ „ Sale Price $425.00 

(Regular Price $485.00) 

24" Color TV Sale Price $415.00 

(Regular Price $485.00) 

HURRY! 

Supply Limited! On January 15th 
This Sale Is Absolutely Oyer! 

COL. KENNER'S 

Appliance Co. 

5980 Taylor Mill toad - 356-S440 

Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m. 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 



Thursday, January 7, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 






L 



^e» 



1th Hi 






*««-, 



FROM BLUE SHIELD 




Cold Sores 



TV Hazard 

To eliminate the hazard of x- 
Tadiation, color television view- 
ers should sit at least six feet 
from the set according to the 
Federal government's Bureau of 
Radiological Health. While 
black and white sets present no 
danger, turning down the color 
intensity of a color set to pro- 
duce black and white still 
doesn't reduce the possibility of 
x-radiation from some sets. 
Since most servicemen aren't 
equipped to test for a color set's 
x-radiation, viewers should fol- 
low the distance guideline. This 
is particularly important for 
small children. 



Cold sores are little fever 
blisters which often occur in 
small groups around the face 
with the onset of a cold. Due to 
a virus or infection, they rapid- 
ly become crusted and sore. In 
the initial stages, spirits of 
camphor or tincture or benzoin 
may make the tender areas less 
sensitive and hasten drying. 
The healing process may also 
be accelerated by the use of dry- 
ing lotions or powders. Cold 
■ores usually dry up in a week 
to 10 days. However, if the prob- 
lem persists, see your doctor. 




THE TWO OF YOU 



FUN FOR TWOSOMES 




TUe seer rows Nte 

MAPE FOR TUETVK) OP 
YOU TO SHARE. FINEST 
RESTAURANTS SERVE 
CHATEAUBRIAND 
CHERRIES JUBILEE* 
CREPES SUZETTES 
JUST FOR THE TWO 
OP YOU. 



There are hunpreps op 

RECIPES FOR THE TWO OF 
YOU. COOK BOOKS FOR 
THE TWO OP VOU COS/BR 
EVERYTHING FROM 
HORS P'OBUVRES TO 
PESSERTS ANP 
VIENNESE COFFEE. 





When you are in 
love. picnics for 
the two of vou 

WW*"" 



^ > 




ELECTRICAL IN WATOR1, 
* TRAVEL i HRouuH NKflMt 
FIBERS FAftTf ft 
THAN THE TOP SfUDftOP 
HlQttTAMTO 
OPTCM REACHING 
AS HltfH AS 
200 MILtf AN HOUR/ 



Observe Golden Wedding 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Alsip, Fiskburg, 
celebrated their 50th wedding anni- 
versary on December 5. 

A surprise reunion in their honor 
was previously held in October at 
Tarron Camp Site, Kattawa. 

They have nine children: Willard, 
Dfllard, Mrs. Edith Chowning, Ches- 
ter, Charles, Mrs. Ruby Lister, Mrs. 
Irene Powell, Mrs. Louise Mercer, 
and Mrs. Norma Ryan. 



BIT 'N' SPUR CLUB 

The 4-H Bit 'n Spur Saddle Club 
is having its first meeting of the new 
year on Friday, January 8, at 7:30 
p. m. 

If you are interested in the 4-H 
hoTse project and between the ages of 
9 and 19, please attend this meeting. 
It will be held at the home of Luther 
Stephens, 109 South Main St., Wal- 
ton, or call 485-4850. 



-DEATHS- 

BRUCE ALLEN 

Bruce Allen, 90, j-retired Boone 
County farmer, died at 6:00 p. m., 
Tuesday, Dec. 22, at his home. 

A native of Union, he lived most 
of his life on Nicholsoii Road, Wal- 
ton. His wife, Mrs. Virgie Johnson 
Allen, died in 1966. 

The only survivor is a nephew, 
Allen Smith, of Covington. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Saturday, Dec. 26, at the Hamilton 
Funeral Home, Verona. . 

m r ■ l 

GILBERT H. BORCHERS 

Gilbert H. Borchers, 63, Frogtown 
Road, Walton, died of an apparent 
heart attack at 9:00 p. m., Thursday, 
Dec. 24, at his home. 

A retired machinist for Cincinnati 
Union Terminal, he was a memt>er of 
Local 376, International Association of 
Machinists. 

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. 
Emma Mcintosh Borchers; two sons, 
Gilbert^L. and Donald W. Borchers, 
both of Walton; a sister, Mrs. Dor- 
othy Haubner of Independence, and 
three brothers, Bernard C. and Leon- 
ard Borchers of Covington, and Nor- 
bert Borchers of Ft. Wright. 

Services were held at 10:30 a. m., 
Tuesd<ry, Dec. 29, at Stith, Florence. 

DAWSON McDANNOLD 

Dawson McDannold, 76, of Cody 
Road, Independence, died at 2:15 p. 
m., Sunday, Dec. 20, at the home of 
a niece in Erlanger, after a short ill- 
ness. 

A retired farmer, he was a member 
of Bradford Lodge, No. 123, F&AM, 
Independence, and of Indra Consistory 
of Scottish Rite. 

Survivors include two sisters, Mrs. 
Nellie Cox and Mrs. Nettie Fier- 
f elder, both of Covington. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Wednesday, Dec. 23, at Swindler, 
Latonia. 

Bradford Lodge held services at 
7:00 p. m., Tuesday. 

LUTHER MAXWELL 

Luther Maxwell, 64, of 508 Riggs 
Road, Independence, died at 4:40 p. 
m., Monday, Dec. 21, at his home 
after a long illness. 

He was a retired carpenter, and a 
native of Wayne County. 

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. 
Edna Harp Maxwell, and 11 child- 
ren: Daughters, Mrs. Lois Byrd of 
Phoenix, Ariz., Mrs. Joyce Warren 
and Mrs. Lola Botfman of Covington, 
Mrs. Bertha Kenney of Pricne George, 
Canada, Mrs. Ruby Randies of Inde- 
pendence, and Misses Laura and Deb- 
ra Maxwell, at home; sons, Luther J. 
Maxwell of Ft. Mitchell, Tommy 
Maxwell of Covington, and Ned and 
Kin Maxwell at home; also three 
brothers, Jerry Maxwell of Indepen- 
dence, Ira and Sherman Maxwell of 
Somerset, Ky., and 12 grandchildren. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Thursday, Dec. 2,4 at the Chambers 
and Grubbs Funeral Home, Indepen- 
dence. 



J. B. RICHARDSON 

Joseph B. Richardson, 82, Visalia- 
Staffordsburg Road, Morning View, 
died Tuesday, Dec. 29 at his home. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Georgia Ballinger Richardson; two 
daughters, Mrs. Evelyn Marshall of 
Nicholasville, and Mrs. Reva Finnell 
of Morning View; three sons, Clyde 
Richardson, in Laos, working for the 
government, Lybran Richardson of 
Independence, and Wayne Richa rdson 
of Williamstown; two sistewrCmBS*^ 
Helen Richardson of Morning View, 
and Mrs. Mayme Giles of Covington, 
and a brother, Ray Richardson of 
Florence. " 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Thursday, Dec. 31, at the Chambers 
and Grubbs Funeral Home, Inde- 
pendence. Burial was in Independence 
Cemetery. Masonic services were held 
at 7:30 p. m., Wednesday. 

MRS. LILLIE CHAPMAN 

Mrs. Lillie Chapman, 70, of High 
St., Walton, died last Thursday eve- 
ning at the Woodspoint Convalescent 
Home, Florence, after a long illness. 



She is survived by her husband, 
Elmer Chapman; two sons, Vemon L. 
and Harold Chapman, both of Wal- 
ton; four daughters, Mrs, Charles 
Mann of Crittenden, Mrs. Ronnie 
Cleek of Covington, and Mrs. Sam 
Gamble and Mrs. Clifton (Bud) Rob- 
inson, both of Walton; two brothers, 
Leonard Brewster of Walton, and 
Kimber Brewster of Wellington, 111. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Sunday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. Burial was in 
New Bethel Cemetery, Verona. 



CARLISLE'S y«?£KIDS 




Plan now for a full winter sea- 
son of warmth. Use our effic- 
ient fuel oil service. Phone 
485-4391 for speedy delivwy. 



C LOCAL TKADUUMU, tac • 




THOMAS LEE STEPHENCON 

Thomas Lee Stephenson, 61, of 
Crittenden, a Kenton County farmer, 
died last Friday at St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital. 

He was a member of the Kenton 
County Stablization and Conservation 
Service's supervisory board. 

Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. 
Margare Hudson Stephenson; a daugh- 
ter, .Mrs. Stanley Collett, and a son, 
Thomas Stephesnon, Jr., both of Ken- 
ton County. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Monday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. Burial was 
in Highland Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell. 



MRS. THERESA M. HALL 

Mrs. Theresa M. Hall, 60, of 14~V 
South Main St., Walton, died at 9:00y 
p. m., Thursday, Dec. 24, at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital from injuries suffered 
in a fall at her home on Thursday, 
November 5th. 

Services were held at 10:30 a. m., 
Monday, Dec. 28, at the Eckler Fu- 
neral Home, Dry Ridge. Burial was 
in Hillcrest Cemetery, Dry Ridge. 

Rev. A. J. Russell conducted the 
service. Songs were by Mrs. Katheripe 
Kent, and music by James Spencer. 

Survivors include her husband, Leon 



B. Hall; a daughter, Mrs. Raetta Sue 
Knueven, at home, whoe husband is 
stationed at Ft. Bragg, N C, with 
the U. S. Army; one son, Randall Lee 
Hall, of Walton; one grandson, Jeffery 
Steven Hall, Walton, and a brother, 
James L. Messmer, of Verona. 

Mrs. Hall was an active member of 
the Walton Christian Church; mem- 
ber of the CWF, treasurer of the 
Ladies Aid Society, and member of 
the Loyal Women's Sunday School 
Class. 

She was a native of Grant County, 
and; was the daughter of the late 
Henry and Maggie Messmer, Verona.. 



BOB & DENNY'S AUTO BODY 

5824 MADISON PIKE NICHOLSON, KY. 

Phone 356-2346 

i —INSURANCE WORK— 
Free Estimates and Free Pickup and Delivery 



i> 



fyjfrfa' 



Hene- awe fl» hm& JocA p"uee* 

PORK CHOP SALE 

Center Rib Chops lb. 69c— Rib End Chops lb. 49c 



Plumber, arriving six hours after 
the call: How are things Mr. Smith? 
Mr. Smith: Not so bad. While we 
were waiting I taught Mrs. Smith 
how to swim. 

CARD OF THANKS- 

I would like to express my sincere 
appreciation to everyone for the pray- 
ers, cards, visits and every kindness 
shown to me and my family during 
my illness. Your concern has meant 
so much, and we will always be 
grateful, 
lt-lc CAROL BURDEN 



$50.00 REWARD 

For arrest and conviction 
of person or persons for 
shooting windows at Sleet 
residence, Box 74-A, Per- 
cival Road # Walton, Ky. 



SAUSAGE 



FRESH COUNTRY 
Made In Store 



ib 49c 



Spare Ribs 



COUNTRY STYLE 
Good and Meaty LB. 



49c 



GRAPEFRUIT SECTIONS, While Villa large 50-oz. size 79c 

SLICED PEACHES, Sweel Hickory large 29-oz. size 29c 



Tomato Juice 



SWEET HICKORY 
Large 46-Oz. Size 



25c 



CUT GREEN BEANS, Sweel Hickory 15-oz. size 15c 

CREAM STYLE CORN, Sweel Hickory 16-oz. size 15c 

TOMATOES, Sweel Hickory ..«&?« tie. 19c 

Saltine Crackers ™£Z 23c 

HOT DOG CHILI SAUCE, While Villa W/i-oz. size 23c 

CHOCOLATE PIES, Jumbo 18-oz. size 39c 

DOGY DOG FOOD 16-oz. size .9c 

Produce Department 



Head Lettuce 



URGE 
24 SIZE 



2-39c 



FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OF $3.00 OR MORE 



Model 




Store 



FREE Delivery Every Morning— Monday, Tuesday b Wednesday 
Two Deliveries On Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 6:00 p. m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 8:00 p. m., Friday and Saturday 



Phone 485-4991 



Walton, Kentucky 



? 



Thursday, January 7, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



L 



^ea 



1th Hi 



^/B» 



**t S -, 



FROM BLUE SHIELD 




TV Hazard 

To eliminate the hazard of x- 
radiation, color television view- 
ers should sit at least six feet 
from the set according to the 
Federal government's Bureau of 
Radiological Health. While 
black and white sets present no 
danger, turning down the color 
intensity of a color set to pro- 
duce black and white still 
doesn't reduce the possibility of 
x-radiation from some sets. 
Since most servicemen aren't 
equipped to test for a color set's 
x-radiation, viewers should fol- 
low the distance guideline. This 
is particularly important for 
small children. 



Cold Sores 

Cold sores are little fever 
blisters which often occur in 
small groups around the face 
with the onset of a cold. Due to 
a virus or infection, they rapid- 
ly become crusted and sore. In 
the initial stages, spirits of 
camphor or tincture of benzoin 
may make the tender areas less 
sensitive and hasten drying. 
The healing process may also 
be accelerated by the use of dry- 
ing lotions or powders. Cold 
sores usually dry up in a week 
to 10 days. However, if the prob- 
lem persists, see your doctor. 




THE TWO OF YOU 




[foop fun for twosomes 

Tte rcsr F00R5 are 

MAPE FOR -TVtETWO OP 
' * f$B V0 U TO SHARE. FINEST 

RESTAURANTS SERVE 
CHATEAU BRIAN!?, 
CHERRIES JUBILEE, 
CREPES SUteTTBS 
JUSTBOR THE TWO 

op you. 



There are hunprec* op 

FECI PES FOR THE TWO OF 
YOU. COOK BOOKS FOR 
THE TWO OF VOU COVER 
EVERYTHING FROM 
HORS P'OEUVRES 10 
PESSERTTS ANP 
VIENNESE COFFEE. 





When you are in 
iovev picnics for 
the two of you 

AgJVERy.gpBClAU 



kJL 




ELECTRICAL IN MATURE, 
-IKAVfcL THROUGH NfcKWft 

FIBERS FA*Tf ft 
THAN THE TOP 

NfotfrAuw 

OFTEN REACHIMO. 
A5 HltfH AS 

200 MILfl AN MOOR/ 



Observe Golden Wedding 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Alsip, Fiskburg, 
celebrated their 50th wedding anni- 
versary on December 5. 

A surprise reunion in their honor 
was previously held in October at 
Tarron Camp Site, Kattawa. 

They have nine children: Willard, 
Dfllard, Mrs. Edith Chowning, Ches- 
ter, Charles, Mrs. Ruby Lister, Mrs. 
Irene Powell, Mrs. Louise Mercer, 
and Mrs. Norma Ryan. 



BIT 'N' SPUR CLUB 

The 4-H Bit 'n Spur Saddle Club 
is having its first meeting of the new 
year on Friday, January 8, at 7:30 
p. m. 

If you are interested in the 4-H 
horse project and between the ages of 
9 and 19, please attend this meeting. 
It will be held at the home of Luther 
Stephens, 109 South Main St., Wal- 
ton, or call 485-4850. 



-DEATHS- 

BRUCE ALLEN 

Bruce Allen, 90, j-retired Boone 
County farmer, died at 6:00 p. m., 
Tuesday, Dec. 22, at his home. 

A native of Union, he lived most 
of his life on- Nicholson Road, Wal- 
ton. His wife, Mrs. Virgie Johnson 
Allen, died in 1966. 

The only survivor is a nephew, 
Allen Smith, of Covington. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Saturday, Dec. 26, at the Hamilton 
Funeral Home, Verona.. v 

GILBERT H. BORCHERS 

Gilbert H. Borchers, 63, Frogtown 
Road, Walton, died of an apparent 
heart attack at 9:00 p. m., Thursday, 
Dec. 24, at his home. 

A retired machinist for Cincinnati 
Union Terminal, he was a meml>er of 
Local 376, International Association of 
Machinists. 

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. 
Emma Mcintosh Borchers; two sons, 
Gilbert^L. and Donald W. Borchers, 
both of Walton; a sister, Mrs. Dor- 
othy Haubner of Independence, and 
three brothers, Bernard C. and Leon- 
ard Borchers of Covington, and Nor- 
bert Borchers of Ft. Wright. 

Services were held at 10:30 a. m., 
Tues>fy, Dec. 29, at Stith, Florence. 

DAWSON McDANNOLD 

Dawson McDannold, 76, of Cody 
Road, Independence, died at 2:15 p. 
m., Sunday, Dec. 20, at the home of 
a niece in Erlanger, after a short ill- 
ness. 

A retired farmer, he was a member 
of Bradford Lodge, No. 123, F&AM, 
Independence, and of India Consistory 
of Scottish Rite. 

Survivors include two sisters, Mrs. 
Nellie Cox and Mrs. Nettie Fier- 
f elder, both of Covington. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Wednesday, Dec. 23, at Swindler, 
Latonia. 

Bradford Lodge held services at 
7:00 p. m., Tuesday. 

LUTHER MAXWELL 

Luther Maxwell, 64, of 508 Riggs 
Road, Independence, died at 4:40 p. 
m., Monday, Dec. 21, at his home 
after a long illness. 

He was a retired carpenter, and a 
native of Wayne County. 

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. 
Edna Harp Maxwell, and 11 child- 
ren: Daughters, Mrs. Lois Byrd of 
Phoenix, Ariz., Mrs. Joyce Warren 
and Mrs. Lola Bowjnan of Covington, 
Mrs. Bertha Kenney of Pricne George, 
Canada, Mrs. Ruby Randies of Inde- 
pendence, and Misses Laura and Deb- 
ra Maxwell, at home; sons, Luther J. 
Maxwell of Ft. Mitchell, Tommy 
Maxwell of Covington, and Ned and 
Kin Maxwell at home; also three 
brothers, Jerry Maxwell of Indepen- 
dence, Ira and Sherman Maxwell of 
Somerset, Ky., and 12 grandchildren. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Thursday, Dec. 2,4 at the Chambers 
and Grubbs Funeral Home, Indepen- 
dence. 



J. B. RICHARDSON 

Joseph B. Richardson, 82, Visalia- 
Staffordsburg Road, Morning View, 
died Tuesday, Dec. 29 at his home. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Georgia Ballinger Richardson; two 
daughters, Mrs. Evelyn Marshall of 
Nicholasville, and Mrs. Reva Finnell 
of Morning View; three sons, Clyde 
Richardson, in Laos, working for the 
government, Lybran Richardson of 
Independence, and Wayne Richa rdson 
of Williamstown; two sisteMFSWrar*^. 
Helen Richardson of Morning View, 
and Mrs. Mayme Giles of Covington, 
and a brother, Ray Richardson of 
Florence. ' 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Thursday, Dec. 31, at the Chambers 
and Grubbs Funeral Home, Inde- 
pendence. Burial was in Independence 
Cemetery. Masonic services were held 
at 7:30 p. m., Wednesday. 



CARLISLE'S '/W£KIDS 




Plan now for a full winter sea- 
son of warmth. Use our effic- 
ient fuel oil service. Phone 
485-4391 for speedy delivery. 



C LOCAL IMMIUm fc» * 




±1 r 



OIL CO 

A»W 485-4391 - WaMte* 



She is survived by her husband, 
Elmer Chapman; two sons, Vernon L. 
and Harold Chapman, both of Wal- 
ton; four daughters, Mrs, Charles 
Mann of Crittenden, Mrs. Ronnie 
Cleek of Covington, and Mrs. Sam 
Gamble and Mrs. Clifton (Bud) Rob- 
inson, both of Walton; two brothers, 
Leonard Brewster of Walton, and 
Kimber Brewster of Wellington, 111. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Sunday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. Burial was in 
New Bethel Cemetery, Verona. 

THOMAS LEE STEPHENCON 

Thomas Lee Stephenson, 61, of 
Crittenden, a Kenton County farmer, 
died last Friday at St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital. 

He was a member of the Kenton 
County Stablization and Conservation 
Service's supervisory board. 

Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. 
Margare Hudson Stephenson; a daugh- 
ter, .Mrs. Stanley CoTlett, and a son, 
Thomas Stephesnon, Jr., both of Ken- 
ton County. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Monday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. Burial was 
in Highland Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell. 



MRS. THERESA M. HALL 

Mrs. Theresa M. Hall, 60, of 14~V 
South Main St., Walton, died at 9:00y 
p. m., Thursday, Dec. 24, at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital from injuries suffered 
in a fall at her home on Thursday, 
November 5th. 

Services were held at 10:30 a. m., 

Monday, Dec. 28, at the Eckler Fu 

neral Home, Dry Ridge. Burial was 
in Hillcrest Cemetery, Dry Ridge. 

Rev. A. J. Russell conducted the 
service. Songs were by Mrs. Katheripe 
Kent, and music by James Spencer. 

Survivors include her husband, Leon 



B. Hall; a daughter, Mrs. Raetta Sue 
Knueven, at home, whoe husband is 
stationed at Ft. Bragg, N C, with 
the U. S. Army; one son, Randall Lee 
Hall, of Walton; one grandson, Jeffery 
Steven Hall, Walton, and a brother, 
James L. Messmer, of Verona. 

Mrs. Hall was an active member of 
the Walton Christian Church; mem- 
ber of the CWF, treasurer of the 
Ladies Aid Society, and member of 
the Loyal Women's Sunday School 
Class. 

She was a native of Grant County,, 
and; was the daughter of the late 
Henry and Maggie Messmer, Verona.. 



BOB & DENNY'S AUTO BODY 

5824 MADISON PIKE NICHOLSON, KY. 

Phone 356-2346 

—INSURANCE WORK— 
Free Estimates and Free Pickup and Delivery 



i> 




Hene. an© tka iww«t \ooi puce* 

PORK CHOP SALE 

Center Rib Chops lb. 69c— Rib End Chops lb. 49c 



SAUSAGE 



PRESH COUNTRY 
Made In Store 



ib 49c 



# 



Spare Ribs 



COUNTRY STYLE 
Good and Meaty LB. 



49c 



GRAPEFRUIT SECTIONS, White Villa large 50-oz. size 79c 

SLICED PEACHES, Sweet Hickory large 29-oz. size 29c 



Tomato Juice 



SWEET HICKORY 
Large 46-Oz. Size 



25c 



MRS. LILLIE CHAPMAN 

Mrs. Lillie Chapman, 70, of High 
St., Walton, died last Thursday eve- 
ning at the Woodspoint Convalescent 
Home, Florence, after a long illness. 



Plumber, arriving six hours after 
the call: How are things Mr. Smith? 
Mr. Smith: Not so bad. While we 
were waiting I taught Mrs. Smith 
how to swim. 

CARD OF THANKS- 

I would like to express my sincere 
appreciation to everyone for the pray- 
ers, cards, visits and every kindness 
shown to me and my family during 
my illness. Your concern has meant 
so much, and we will always be 
grateful, 
lt-lc CAROL BURDEN 



$50.00 REWARD 

For arrest and conviction 
of person or persons for 
shooting windows at Sleet 
residence, Box 74*A, Per- 
cival Road, Walton, Ky. 



CUT GREEN BEANS, Sweet Hickory 15-oz. size 15c 

CREAM STYLE CORN, Sweet Hickory 16-oz. size 15c 

TOMATOES, Sweet Hickory ..<4fc<» fize. 19c 

Saltine Crackers ™£Z 23c 

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WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 2 



First Woman Seated 
On Walton-Verona 
Board of Education 

Mrs. Colleen V. Shields has begun 
a four-year term as a member of the 
Walton-Vetona Board of Education. 
She has the distinction of being the 
first woman to serve in this capacity. 
Mrs. Shields had attended two prev- 
ious meetings to familiarize herself 
with procedures. J 

The Walton-Verona school system 
is no strange thing for Mrs. Shields 
as she attended both elementary and 
high here and taught in the methe- 
matics department for 10V4 years. 

In stating some of her desires and 
objectives for the school system, she 
said: 

"I am interested in keeping Walton- 
Verona an independent school system. 
I know there are many arguments pro 
and con, but in this age when we are 
all reduced to a number, it is nice to 
have the teacher-student relationship 
that the smaller independent school 
system can provide. 

"I think we should strive to pro- 
vide the best possible education for 
each child. I feel the needs uf *be 
student should always be considered 
first in the distribution of funds. 

"I am interested in providing safe 
transportation for tjhe students, hiring 
qualified substitutes when available, 
providing the best maintenance of ex- 
isting buildings, and increasing com- 
munication between the school and 
the community. 

"In general, the school should pro- 
vide a challenge for the child with 
the high IQ, as well as the slow learn- 
er, and all those in between the two." 

Mrs. Shields and her husband, 
Clinton, reside at 17 Alta Vista, and 
they have a son, Val Britton, age SYi. 

Also beginning new four-year terms 
are Walt Ryan of Verona, and J. B 
McCubbin of Walton. This is the 
second term for each of these men. 
Daniel Hance and William Waller are 
the other members of the five-member 
board. 

Business Session Light 

The amount of business conducted 
Saturday by the school board was held 
to a minimum. One important item 
approved was the changing of the 
meeting time to the second Thursday 
of each month at 7:30. 

The treasurer's December report: 
Balance, Dec. 1 $124,086.59 

Received $ 39,663.03 

Disbursed $ 33,946.74 

Balance, Dec.31 $129,800.88 

In case of severe weather conditions 
the school closing report will be given 
on WLW radio. 



Fess Parker Meets 
With Louie B. Nunn 

Fess Parker reportedly met in Frank- 
fort last Wednesday with Gov. Louie 
Nunn to discuss roads on his pro- 
posed $20 million amusement park 
near Walton. 

Word of the meeting came from 
Al J. Schneider, a friend of Parker's 
and prominent builder and developer 
in Louisville. 

"He went to see the governor," 
Schneider confirmed. "There are some 
roads connected with it (Frontier 
Worlds) .... that was primarily 
their meeting." 

Schneider said Parker arrived in 
Kentucky Tuesday, stayed in Louisville 
then left by plane for Tennessee be- 
fore returning to California. 

Schneider reported that Parker was 
"very encouraged" after his meeting 
with Gov. Nunn. "The governor has 
been very cooperative." 

Frontier World, a dazzling develop- 
ment for northern Kentucky, has been 
in the making for more than three 
years, but has been stymied by lack of 
financing. 

Fespar Enterprises", Frontier World's 
developing firm, holds several hundred 
acres in the Walton area, purchased 
for more than half a million dollars. 

Mother-Daughter Cancer 
Program at W-V High 

A mother and daughter cancer in- 
formation program has been scheduled 
for 9:00 a. m., Wednesday, January 
27th, at the Walton-Verona High 
School by the Boone County Cancer 
Society and school officials. 

The two-part program features a 
film on cancer detection and a ques- 
tion and answer session with Dr. Wm. 
M. Waller, Walton, presiding. \ 



BOONE FISCAL COURT 
SEEKS BUILDING IDEAS 

Boone County Fiscal Court mem- 
bers toured the new Covington-Kenton 
County Municipal Building, Tuesday 
evening. Purpose was to gain ideas 
in planning Boone County's proposed 
new jail-police building. 

Carl Bankemper & Associates of 
Covington, designed the Covington 
building, and is also architect for the 
proposed Boone structure. 

Need for a new Boone County jail 
has long been pointed out and was 
recently accentuated by the escape of 
nine prisoners in two jailhreaks. But 
size, scope, cost, financing and loca- 
tion of a new building have not yet 
'been determined. 

Fiscal Court members met at the 
Bankemper office at 7:30. p. m. and 
then toured the Covington-Kenton 
building with the architect. 

January Meeting of 
Local Literary Club 



The Walton Woman's Literary 
Club held its regular monthly meet- 
ing on Wednesday, January 6, at 
2:00 p. m. f in the Walton Christian 
Church. 

Mrs. A. H. Gaines, president, open- 
ed the meeting by leading members 
in the salute to the flag and the read- 
ing of the club collect. 

Mrs. Charles Allphin discussed the 
plight of our prisoners of war. She 
suggested letters, which club mem- 
bers should write to help in the pro- 
test to the North Vietnamese for the 
release of the prisoners. 

Mrs. Zayda Clore made a short re- 
port on the recent White House Con- 
ference on Children, held for six 
days in Washington, D. C. The Con- 
ference is held once each decade to 
find ways to increase opportunities for 
better health and education of Amer- 
ica's 55 million children under 14 
years of age. 

Miss Louise Conrad urged members 
and their friends to continue the col- 
lection of coupons from General Mills 
products for kidney machines for lo- 
cal hospitals. 

Mrs. William Brown gave the 
Spiritual Guidance, Her topic was a 
"January Resoution — To Show More 
Kindness, More Smiles and More 
Love In Action to Our Fellow Men." 
She recited the poem, "Ahsu Ben Ad- 
hem," by J. H. L. Hunt, with em- 
phasis on the line, "write me as one 
that loves his fellow men." She 
closed the devotional with prayer. 

Mrs. Lloyd Watson, past president, 
introduced the guest speaker, Mrs. 
John Acra, State Home Life Depart- 
ment Chairman of KFWC. Her topic 
was written as a personal prayer by 
Mary Stewart, a native of Ohio. Mrs. 
Acra illustrated her talk with candles, 
lighting a white taper for each petition 
in the prayer: Freedom from pettiness, 
from fault finding, from pretense, 
from hasty judgment, and help for 
serenity, for better impulses, to dis- 
regard little differences, and to be 
kind. 

Mrs Gaines announced that, the 
Fifth District would host the KFWC 
State Convention, January 25-26-27, 
at the President Motor Inn, Dixie 
Highway, Ft. Mitchell. 

Mrs. Dan Bedinger reminded club 
members that January, 1971 is the 
48th birthday of the Walton Wo- 
man's Literary Club. She expressed 
the appreciation of the club to Mts. 
Gaines for serving as the club's presi- 
dent in 1970-71. Mrs. Gaines is a 
charter member and past president of 
the club. She has served the club in 
many ways during the years. 

Hostesses were Mrs. Cameron 
Brakefield, Mrs. Carl Conner, Mrs. A. 
J. Russell, and Mrs. Walter Whitson. 
A delicious dessert course was serv- 
ed. The tables were attractive with a 
snow man center piece and miniature 
snow man place favors. 

Members present were: Miss Rachel 
Acree, Mrs. Charles Allphin, Mrs. Dan 
Bedinger, Miss Virginia Beverly, Mrs. 
W. R. Belcher, Mrs. William Brown, 
Mrs. Jesse Callen, Mrs. Zayda Clore, 
Mrs. Carl Conner, Miss Louise Con- 
rad, Mrs. A. H. Gaines, Mrs. George 
Knox, Mrs. D. L. Lusby, Mrs. H. F. 
Mann, Mrs. W. H. Presser, Mrs. W. 
W. Rouse, Mrs. A. J. Russell, Miss 
Katherine Scott, Mrs. Sam B. Sleet, 
Miss Elma Taylor, Mrs. Claude 
Thompson, Mrs. Lloyd Watson, Miss 
Mary West, and Mis. Eleanor Rod- 
ney.— Club Reporter 

Wife: I have some good news for 
you. Husband: What? Wife: You 
haven't been paying those auto insur- 
ance premiums for nothing. 



Fire Chief Gives 
Annual Report 

The annual report by Fire Chief 
Charles Worthington of the Walton 
Volunteer Fire Department, shows an 
increase of runs made in 1970 over 
1969. Squad runs led the list with 
46 responses, buildings 23, vehicles 18, 
and grass fires 24. Eight miscellan- 
eous runs gave a total of 119, as 
compared to 97 one year ago. There 
were also some standbys at Indepen- 
dence. Florence and Independence 
were also called to standby in Wal- 
ton. There were five false alarms 
recorded. # ' 

Officers chosen for 71 are: Charles 
Worthington, Chief; Guy Carlisle, 
Deputy Chief; Bill Frederick, First 
Assistant and Ed Berkemeier, Second 
Assistant; Treasurer, Luther Stephens, 
assisted by Jim Bonar; Jess Thornton, 
Secretary. 

The engine captain is Terry Mc- 
Cubbin; engine lieutenant John Tay- 
lor; ladder captain, Dave Aininer; lieu- 
tenant, Mike Jarman; host captain, j^ the titst Church Lea gue basket- 
Mitch Napier; lieutenant, Dean Ward; .j^ game( Saturday night, St. Cecilia 



'The Restless Ones" at 
The First Baptist Church 

"The Restless Ones," considered the 
most successful motion picture yet 
produced by Evangelist Billy Graham, 
will be shown in Walton on January 
27, in the First Baptist Church. 

With the accent on youth, this 
feature-length film deals imaginatively 
and dramatically with the teenage 
crisis. With a background setting pro- 
vided by the 1963 Billy Graham Los 
Angeles Crusade, and artfully woven 
into the story pattern, "The Restless 
Ones" is a hard-hitting, bold approach 
to our social problems. 

Here is a film which dares to be 
different, a story which will stir the 
heart and mind. Having see^i "The 
Restless Ones," you will never be the 
same. The film has skillfully brought 
into focus the contemporary, plight of 
both parents and teenagers. 

Church League 
Basketball Results 



fire police, Ken ^Berkemeier, and radio, 
Jesse Thornton. 

The volunteers meet each Monday 
evening at the fire house. Any able- 
bodied young man is invited to attend, 
take the training and become an 
active part of this community-minded 
organization. 

Officers for the Ladies' Auxiliary 
are: Jean Thornton, president; Cynthia 
Still, vice-president; Dorothy Still, 
secretary; Addie King, treasurer; Eva 
Waters* advisor. The auxiliary would 
also welcome new members. 

Burley Marts Reopen 
And Prices Are High 



stopped Walton Christians' winning 
streak by winning 74-54. Heusman 
led St. Cecilia with 18 points, while 
Heuser added 51 and Powers 14. 
Charlie Holder topped the losers with 
19 tallies. 

In., the second contest, Hickory 
Grove defeated Richwood, 75-67, as 
Masrin led the winners with 23, and 
Bolen added 19. Spillman was tops 
for Richwood with 18, and Roaden 
chipped in with 17. 

The last game saw Walton Baptist 
defeat All Saints,- 74-68. Ron Brown 
led the winners with 27 markers. Bill 
Wethington had 35 for the losers. 

This coming Saturday at 6:00, Piner 
goes against Hickory Grove. In the 

second game at 7:30, New Bethel is 

Northern Kentucky 5 oUcco auction A to ^ Richwood , ^ at o :0 o, Wal- 

puffed happily after the post ton Christian gQe$ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



folk 

Christmas season's first day. 

"Good sale, right smart high prices," 
said Bobby Franks, general manager at 
Route 25 New Burley Tobacco Ware- 
house, near the 1-75 Richwood exit. 

At his site, 271,316 pounds sold 
for $194,153.80, averaging $71.56 per 
hundredweight. 

Erlanger Tobacco Market had its 
sales at Covington Independent; >158 
Dixie Highway. "Prices were a little 
higher than in the pre-Christmas 
auctions," smiled President Nathan 
Elliott. He saw 153,058 pounds go 
for $108,104.87, a $70.63 average. 



Church of Christ. You're invited. 

New Haven PTA to Meet 

The New Haven PTA will meet 
Monday, January 18 at 7:30 p. m., in 
the school cafeteria. 

The program will be, "Challenge 
Us Tomorrow," by the Cincinnati Bell 
Telephone Company. 

A baby sitter will be provided for 
pre-school children. All parents are 
urged to attend. 

"I don't think I look 30, do you?' 
"Not any more, dear." 



Historical Marker Presenlaion At Richwood 
Presyblerian Church On Sunday Afternoon 

On Sunday, January 17th, Rich- ularly at the Richwood Church. Mis* 
wood Persbyterian Church will dedi- 
cate an historical markwer, awarded to 
the church by the Highway Marker 
Committee of the Kentucky Hitorical 
Society. 

The ceremony will take place at 
3:00 p. m., at the church on Rich- 
wood Road, Walton, followed by a 
reception in the parish house. 

Special music will be provided by 
Mrs. Robert Schaffer and Mrs. Char- 
les Higdon. Ellis Crawford, well 
known historian of Northern Ken- 
tucky, will make some introductory 
remarks, followed by an historical 
sketch of the church by Ashlin Logan, 
an elder in the church. 

The dedicatory address will be given 
by Rev. Julian Charles, a former pas- 
tor of the church, now minister of 
the First Presbyterian Church, Cov- 
ington. 

The Richwood Church is the oldest 
Presbyteriari Church in the Northern 
Kentucky Tri-County area, having been 
founded in. 1834 by Joseph Cabell 
Harrison of the distinguished Harrison 
families of Virginia and Kentucky. He 
was a, first cousin of William Henry 
Harrison, President of the United 
Statjj. Few churches, either city or 
ruTal, have the distinction of having 
as their founder a member of one 
of the most prominent families in the 
history of the nation and whose 
blood connections included the Breck- 
inridge, who worked with him closely 
and intimately in the interest of other 
country churohes during the first half 
of the nineteenth century. 

Of the 13 original members, one 
was Sophia Rice Harrison, wife of the 
founder and granddaughter of David 
Rice, a graduate of Princeton, and the by Master James Brady Walton, of 



Jean Chambers, of Walton, now in 
her nineties, is the oldest living mem- 
ber of the church. 

Joseph Cabell Harrison first studied 
law at Transylvania University and 
then studied for the ministry. He was 
employed by the Board of Domestic 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church 
and traveled extensively in Illinois, 
Indiana and Kentucky. In 1824, he 
and his cousin," ^ohn Breckinridge, es- 
tablished in_ Lexington, the "Western 
Luminary," the first religious paper 
published in Kentucky. In 1833 North- 
em Kentucky was detitute of Presby- 
terian ism and Joseph Cabell Harrison 
came to Boone County and organized 
Richwood Church in 1834, and later 
a church at Burlington and Florence. 
The last two were discontinued many 
years ago, but Richwood has had con- 
tinuous worship services since it was 
established. Joseph Cabell Harrison 
sold his interests in Fayette County 
and purchased about 350 acres on 
Hicks Pike,> Boone County. He built 
a brick home and called in "Home-at- 
Last," since he was not a young man 
anymore and was tired of traveling. 

The means or the purchase of 
land for the church and adjoining 
cemetery was provided by Dr. and 
Mrs. B. F. Bedinger of the same 
vicinity in Boone County. A church 
building was erected but bumed a- 
bout 1870, and at that time the 
present structure was built. In 1960, 
a $30,000 addition was built and the 
debt for this was recently liquidated. 

The present pastor of the Richwood 
Church is Roy Sharpe and he will 
preside at the dedication of the his- 
torical marker, which will be unveiled 



father of the Presbyterian Church in 
Kentucky. A lineal descendant of the 
founder and of David Rice, Mrs. Ash- 
lin Logan, is trie oik, ^uidant of 
the original 13 who now worships reg- 



Boone County, a lineal descendant of 
Elisha Hudson, one of the 13 original 
members and who once owned the 



Buy Police Radio 
System For Boone 

Boone County has purchased al- 
most $7,000 worth of new equipment 
to set up its own police radio system. 

The Fiscal Couril accepted the bid 
last week of Bluegrass Communications 
of 2431 Alexandria Pike, Highland 
Heights, to proviae General Electric 
equipment at a cost of $6,728.50. 

Delivery of equipment is expected 
within 45 days, it is said. However, 
it was reported some time ago that 
the system would be in operation 
this month. 

The new equipment includes a 
130-foot tower, base station, and inter- 
city radio. 

Boone County's police cruiser^ are 
already equipped with two-way radios, 
presently operating throug Erlanger 
Police Department's base station. 

County police, sheriff and deputies 
and Walton police will then be dis- 
patched on a round-the-clock basis 
through the Boone radio system. 

County .Judge Brace Ferguson said 
the base station would be set up in 
the old Martin house, next door to 
the Burlington Courthouse. 

Plans are to move both the police 
headquarters and radio system into a 
new police headquarters and jail still 
in the planning stage. 

Bearcats Win Two; 
Pioneers Break Even 

Bearcats Smother Rebels, 64-37 

The Walton-Verona Bearcats won 
their tenth game of the season by 
spanking the Rebels of Boone Coun- 
ty, 64-37, Tuesday night of last week 
at Florence. 

The 'Cats doubled the score on the 
home team in the opening period and 
never had any trouble in the final 
three periods. It was the fifth loss 
in seven games for Boone County. 

Bobby Messmer led the winners 
with 16 points, and Ronnie Huffman 
added 13, and Rick Goldsberry 12. 
Mike Karr topped the Rebels with 
13 tallies. 

Walton-Verona also won the re- 
serve game. 

Pioneers Take Dbrie, 90-67 

Simon Kenton rallied in the second 
period and went on to take a 90-67 
victory over Dixie Heights, Tuesday 
night of last week at Independence. 

The Pioneers trailed 6-0 in the first 
two minutes of play and did not 
catch up until late in the first half. 
A 24-point third period put them in 
front to stay. 

Greg Halderman with 22, and 
Randy Davis with 20 led the winners, 
while Leistner and Martin had 16 
points each for the victors. Doug 
Frye had 15 for Dixie. 

Dixie Heights won the reserve en- 
counter, 57-38. 

Walton-Verona 100, Gallatin Co. 59 

The Walton-Verona Bearcats won 
their eleventh game of the season and 
hit the century mark in downing Gal- 
latin County, 100-59, last Friday eve- 
ning at Walton. 

The Bearcats left no doubt of their 
superiority by doubling the score on 
the losers in the first period. 

Gary Ingram led the ten scorers of 
the winners with 21 points. Bob 
Brown had 20 for Gallatin County. 

Boone County 61, Simon Kenton 58 

Don Haynes turned in a 3-point 
play in the final seconds of play to 
give the Boone County Rebels a 61-58 
win over Simon Kenton, last Friday 
evening at Independence. 

The Rebels, who led at the end 
of the first half, fell behind in the 
third period. 

Mike Kan scored nine to spark the 
wiinners to a^ 58-58 tie to set the 
stage for Haynes. Karr led the win- 
ners in scoring with 20 points, while 
Henry had 12 and Moore 11. Greg 
Halderman had 23 tallies for Simon 
Kenton,, and Leistner came up with 
13, and Rust 10. 

Reserves: Boone County, 48-46. 

Insurance Meet, January 18 

The annual meeting of the policy 
holders of the Kenton County Assess- 
ment Fire Insurance Company is to 
be held in their office in Indepen- 
dence, on Monday, January 18, at 
12:00 noon. 

The purpose of the meeting will 
be the election of six directors, accord- 
ing to provisions of the charter, as 



Children Perform at 
White's Tower PTA 

The December ^meeting of the 
White's Tower PT*, presided by Mrs. 
Joseph Gadd, was an enjoyable even- 
ing for all those who attended. The 
devotion was given by Mr. Harold 
Pettit, most timely and wise words 
were spoken. 

The program was given by the sixth 
grade chorus under thp direction of 
Mrs. Roy Klein. The children pre- 
sented a play, "The Cfioir Boy Who 
Couldn't Sing", with narrator being 
Sondra Shell. Other characters in the 
play were Timothy Mitchell, Greg 
Riddell, Randy Snow, Michael Glenn, 
David Schoonover, Gary Gemmer,— 
Carol Allender, Kathy Durden. The 
chorus presented six numbers during 
the play. There isn't anything more 
touching than children. It was a 
pleasure to all. 

The room count, was won by 
fourth grade, Mrs. Moore's room, first 
prize; sixth grade, Mrs. Smith's room, 
second prize; and sixth grade, Miss 
Childers room, third prize. 

The meeting was adjourned after a 
short business meeing. Refreshments 
were served in the cafeteria. 

Two New Members 
01 Kenton County 
Board of Education 

Two new members were sworn into 
office, and Robert R. Scott was elect- 
ed chairman when the Kenton County 
Board of Education held its organ- 
izational meeting. 

Scott, a product of the Kenton 
County system and a graduate of the 
University of Kentucky, began his 
12th term as chairman. He was nam- 
ed to the board in 1952 when there 
were but 4,000 students Today the 
system "has 10,000 and problems in 
housing and transportation. 

Walter Behler, elected in Novem- 
ber, and Frank Breeden, named to fill 
the vacancy caflsed by the resigna- 
tion of W. W. Worthington, were 
given the oath of office by Robert 
Ruberg, board attorney. 

Edgare V. Wilson, Jr., was elected 
vice-chairman of the board. 
Supt. Hinsdale Improving 

The members also heard a report 
that R. C. Hinsdale, superintendent, 
injured in a holiday accident in South 
Carolina, was recovering and would 
return to Northern Kentucky within 
a week or two for further treatment 
and recuperation. 

Program at Piner School 

The Piner School Christmas pro- 
gram was presented to parents, faculty 
members and friends on Wednesday 
afternoon, Dec. 15. 

Before the program was presented, 
Mrs. Shirlie Gilvin, PTA president, 
announced that instead of taking a 
room count for the month, each room 
would be presented $2.00. 

Miss Berna, music teacher, and Mr. 
Daniels, band teacher, were presented 
a gift in appreciation of their work 
with the children. 

The program, "Christmas Eve," was 
represented by members of each class. 
Everyone enjoyed the program. 

The next PTA meeting will be held 
February 18th in the school auditor- 



ium. 



land first sold recently to Fronti^ y&> ' '« the policy. The election 
Worlds for development. wfllbe held from 12:00 to 1:00. 



Father Installs Son 
Master, Union Lodge 

Garry C. Kelly was installed as 
Master of Boone Union Lodge, No. 
304, F&AM, by his father, Virgil W. 
Kelly. The Installing Marshal was his 
brother, Virgil Lee Kelly. Brother 
Gary is the third member of the Kelly 
family to serve as Master, of Boone 
Union as both his father and brother 
are Past Masters. 

Garry has been a member of the 
Lodge since 1965. Both he and his 
wife are members of Union Star 
Chapter, No. 461, and are officers in 
the chapter. 

Other officers installed were: Ron- 
nie Tanner, Junior Warden; Gary 
Barlow, Senior Warden; Jack Gilliam, 
Senior Deacon; Bobby Fish, Junior 
Deacon; Warren Miller, Treasurer, 
Nelson Swango, Secretary; Fred Gay, 
Senior Steward; Bob Thaman, Junior 
Steward, and Bill Mason, Tiler. Jack 
Renaker, Chaplain, was unable to be 
installed. 

Bro. Virgil Kelly presented Garry 
with a gavel, which was engraved with 
his name, a gift from his family. Other 
gifts were also presented at this time. 
Everyone then enjoyed refreshments 
after the installation. 

Fish Fry, Dance at Union 

The Union Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment and the Ladies' Auxiliary will 
have a fish fry and dance on Satur- 
day, January 23, at the Union Fire 
House. The fish fry will start at 5:30 
and continue until 8:30 p. m. The 
dance will be from 9:00 p. m. until 
1:DU a. m. Admission for the dance 
will be $1.50 per person. Music will 
be provided by "Country Classic." 









"■ 



Thursday, January 14, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Wafton, Kentucky 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 

Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 • Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 

Assistant Editor 

Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch. Foreign Rate, 6c Per Line. 






Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smith and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Wal- 
lace were Sunday dinner guests of her 
sister, Mrs. Myrtle Piper, and her 
mother, Mfc. Estelle Perry. Mrs. Per- 
ry is making her home with her 
daughter, Mrs. Piper, in Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Burgess were 
Saturday evening guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Woodrow Perry of Owenton. 

Mrs. Claude Wallace was the Sat- 
urday dinner guest of her son, Robert 
Lancaster, his wife and daughters. 

Mrs. Lil Young spent Thursday 
night and Friday with Mrs. Lee Naive 
of Banklick Road! 

Mr. and Mrs. Dumont Gouge and 
daughter, Andrea, were Sunday din- 
ner guests of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Andy Penn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hahn were 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Melvin 
Utley. 

Mrs. Emma Cheesman was the last 
Thursday guest of her daughter, Mrs. 
John Rich, and family. 

The Eastern Star will have a call 
meeting Saturday evening, January 16 
at 7:30, for initiation work. All mem- 
bers are urged to be present. 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Carlisle and 
daughters, Christy and Connie, had as 
guests New Year's Day, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Carlisle, and Rick Goldsberry. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Kacaba and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Callen were the 
Wednesday night guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Mike Kacaba and son, Mike. 
>, The occasion was .Mike's fifth birth- 
day. 

Mr. andTvlTSi John L. Feagan spent 
a recent weekend in Memphis, Tenn., 
with their daughters, Miss Janelle 
Feagan, and Mr. and Mrs. Don Step- 
henson and family. 

Miss Janice Feagan is attending 
Western Kentucky University at Bowl- 
ing Green, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Clifford of 
Cynthiana, were Sunday guests of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Webb 
of Park Avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Shelton of 
Owentori, will celebrate their 50th 
wedding anniversary on Sunday, Jan. 
24th with open house at the First 
United Methodist Chuch, Owenton, 
from 2:00 to 5:00 p. m. They have 
three daughters: Mrs. Earl-D. Sipple 
of Owenton, Mrs. James Marston of 
Pleasant Home, and Mrs. James Law- 
rence of Walton; eight grandchildren, 
and two great-grandchildren. 



Out-of-town guests who attended 
the wedding of Linda Mastin to Terry 
Webster, were.- Mr. and Mrs. Dale 
Harness of LaPorte, Ind., Mr. and 
Mrs. Jerry Schuster and daughter of 
Benton Harbor, Mich., Mr. and Mrs. 
Wallace Whitton of Cincinnati, Mrs. 
Jessie Hammond of Covington, Mr. 
and Mrs. Grastie Whitton and 
daughters of Erlanger, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bobby Lusby and son of Crescent 
Springs, Mrs. Anna Caldwell, Mrs. 
Marcella Fields, Wayne Fields and 
friend of Independence, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jim Gable of Hebron, Mrs. 
Louise Massie, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Stewart of Georgetown, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph Jett of Mt. Olivet, Mr. and 
Mrs. Gil Stehlin of Cincinnati, Mr. 
and Mrs. Kenneth Childers, Mrs. Dul- 
ly Caldwell, Mr. and Mrs. David 
Schrest and daughter of Williamstown, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Beck of 
Owingsville. 

Mr. and Mrs. "Buddy" Whitson 
and family of Ceveland, Ohio, were 
the holiday guests of Mrs. Walter 
Whitson. 

Miss Mary K. Black remains quite 
ill at St. Elizabeth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry Webster of 
Grant County, were Sunday guests of 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Mastin 
and son, David. 

Mrs. Walter Whitson was a recent 
guest of her daughter, Mrs. Jack 
Rosenfeldt and family in Michigan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Eisenschmidt 
and family spent the holidays with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 
McNeely, of Memphis, Tenn. 

Mr. asd Mrs. W. W. Rouse enter- 
tained on Christmas Eve for Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott Jack, Mrs. Martha Jane 
Carpenter, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rouse 
and daughters, Rick Perkins, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Asa M. Rouse and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Asa M. Rouse and 
family entertained on Sunday, Dec. 
27, for a family dinner for the fol- 
lowing: Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Bertram, 
Jr. and daughters of Greenville, Ohio; 
Mrs. W. H. Bertram and daughter, 
I. nan, of Winchester, Ind.; Mr. and 
Mrs. Darrell Harris of Dayton, Ohio; 
Mrs. C. C. Mills of Lexington; Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Rouse and daughters, 
Rick Perkins, Mr. and Mrs. Scott 
Jack, Mr. and Mrs. Kay Barrier and 
daughter, Kelly, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Schadler and sons, Mrs. Shirley Lou 
Cook and children. Mrs. Martha Jane 
Carpenter, and Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
Rouse. 



LOOK FOR OUR AUCTION AD in today's paper. 
This is the Ken Dixon farm on Lemon-Noithcutt 
Road, in Grant County. 

Col. Cecil Wayman, Auctioneer 




Gayle 

McElroy 

Realty 

33 Alto Vista Drive 

Walton, Kentucky 
Phone: 485-4297 



Steven Frederick, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bill Frederick of South Main 
Street in Walton, left last week for 
induction into the U. S. Navy. He is 
now at Orlando, Florida. 

Mrs. Herb Blizzard spent last Sun- 
day in Louisville visiting her son, Dale 
Chapman, and also toured the J. B. 
Speed Art meusem. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jess Callen and Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert Groger spent Sunday 
afternoon visiting several of the local 
folk who are residents of Woodspoint. 
Those they visited were Mrs. Maude 
Wilson, Lib Ingram, Mrs. Ed Elmore, 
Gertrude Daniels and Reamy Simp- 
son. They also visited with Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmer Groger of Florence, Gil- 
bert's cousin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Blizzard held 
open house recently. Those present 
were Dr. and Mrs. John Maddox and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Danny Chapman 
and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. 
Risner and sofy Mr. and Mrs. Meruyn 
Zirk, Mr. and Mrs. Art Kent, Mrs. 
Larry Allphin, Donnie Allen, Miss 
Glenna Beach and Tom Cady. 

Mr. and Mrs. Asa Rouse had as 
their guests over New Year's Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph Bosworth of Flint, Mich. 
Friends of Mrs. W. H. Bertram of 
Winchester, Indiana will be sorry to 
hear she had the misfortune to fall 
and crack a bone in her elbow and 
severly injure her knee. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Fields of Kan- 
sas City, Missouri have been visiting 
Mrs. Dora Fields and Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Allen of High street. 
. Mrs. Maude Wilson and Lib Ingram 
who have been patients at St. Eliza- 
beth hospital have returned to Woods- 
point. 

Malcolm Oliver and Ted Williams 
of Piner are patients at St. Elizabeth 
hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Greene 
visited Mrs. Greene's brother, Andrew 
Henry, at Bethesda hospital Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herb Blizzard of 
Walton, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Risner 
of Verona, and Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Wade and son of Washington, D. C, 
were recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Lillard, Park Hills. 

Fidelis Class Christmas Party 

The Fidelis Class of the First Bap- 
tist Church of Walton held their 
Christmas party at the lovely country 
home of Mrs. Opal Hudson. 

The house was beautifully decorated 
with all the lovely Christmas deco- 
rations. A delicious meal was served 
to Mesdames Opal Pelfry, Effie 
Beach, Wflma Winburn, Lucille All- 
phin, Georgia Greene, Mary Chapman, 
Dorothy Gibson, Virginia Kacaba, 
Mabel Johnson, Vera Wright, the 
teacher. Guests included Mrs. Chris- 
tine Thompson and Juanita Strode of 
Florence, The hostess was assisted by 
her daughter, Fern. 

Engagement Is Announced 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ammer of 
Fairview Court, Walton, announce 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Dianne, to Michael Mahoney, of Bur- 
lington. 

The wedding will take place at the 
Walton United Methodist Church at 
4:00 p. m., January 23rd. 

ALERT today, ALIVE tomorrow! 



Little Blake Eisenschmidt has been 
ill with chicken pox. 

BEAVER LICK 

Delmar Reed is back home from 
the hospital and slowly improving. 

Mrs. Alva Crouch has been taking 
care of her grandson, Kevin, in Cov- 
ington, who has been sick with 
bronchitis. 

The tobacco market opened after 
the Christmas holidays with a boom- 
ing good price. 

Lon Wilson is still in the hospital. 
He hopes to be coming home next 
week. We all wish him , a speedy 
recovery. 

Betty Ellen Miller spent part of 
the holidays with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward ftennedy, and also 
her grandparents* Mr. and Mrs. Omer 
Kite. 

Little Nancy Ferguson paid another 
visit to her doctor recently. 

Mrs. Ruth Carroll spent the day 
at her church in Big Bone, Thursday, 
at an all-day meeting and luncheon. 
All enjoyed the day. 

Mrs. Bea Cleveland is back home 
in Beaver. She seems to be doing bet- 
ter here of late. 

Janice Reed was the Thursday guest 
of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Delmar 



Reed, on Cleek Lane. Janice is a Phyllis Rhodes and son, Rodney,, 
nurse at St. Elizabeth Hospital, and were on TV Thursday with the New 
likes to visit home on her off day. - Haven PTA. 



TRULY HOMELIKE 

A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth' and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 



Independence, Ky. 
356-26573 



—SERVING ALL FAITHS— 



■ 




COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERVICE! 




Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for You — 

Nie's Pharmacy 

LLL Highway between Independence and Nicholson 




DISCOVER THE 

BIG DIFFERENCE 



DAIRY HERD AT ABSOLUTE 



IN LOW-COST AUTO 
INSURANCE 

You do save money with our 
Special Budget Automobile 
Policy. What's more, you get 
quality protection and 
hometown agency service 
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on at all times. 

These plue benefits add up 
to a big difference for you. 

Call or write us today for 
full facts. 

J. B. JOHNSON 

93 North Main Street 

WALTON, KY. 

485-7102 




mon 



I 



y 

REPRESENTING 

OdTOMOBILE MUTUAL 
/INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE^ COLUMBUS, OHIO 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 23 - 1:00 P. M. 

At the farm of Oram Brown, Baton Rouge Road, 
Williamstown, Kentucky. 

Mr. Brown's son, Larry, is quirting farming, and Mr. 
Brown cannot care for this large herd. This herd has 
averaged over 25,000 lbs. milk monthly— 

1 2-year-old Hotstein bull, extra nice; 22 Holsteins 
milking, all young cows, 12 in full flow; Guernsey cow, 
milking; 4 Holstein springers; 7 Hotstein heifers, heavy 
springers. All cattle tested— health papers with each 



cow. 



Oram & Larry Brown, Owners 

Sale Conducted By 

Lillard-Sfeger Realtors 

823-1011 Crittenden, Kentucky 356-5116 

DARWIN BAILEY, AUCTIONEER 
WILLIAM C. LILLARD, AUCTIONEER 




/ find you guilty of speeding, not yielding the right-of-way, 
and making the operator look up your lawyer's phone number. 



EVERYBODY SAVES TIME AND MONEY WHEN YOU USE THE PHONE BOOK INSTEAD OF THE OPERATOR. 



@ Cincinnati BeB 






»-> 



^**- 



Woltop Advertiser, Wolton, Kentucky 



■ORDINANCE NO. 1970-27- 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing Northwest Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interest of its citizens and the best interest of persons owning 
and/ or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated tenitoryi said 
territory lying adjacent to the present northwest corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section I. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 
city. 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, the point of inter- 
section of the North right-of-way line of Beaver Road with the East right-of- 
way line of 1-75; thence with the existing city limits *or three calls; thence 
Easterly 1050 feet with the North right-of-way line of Beaver Road; thence 
Northwesterly 200 feet; thence Northwesterly 1640 feet, more or less, to the 
East right-of-way line of 1-75; thence South 1080 feet, more or less, with the 
East right-of-way line of 1-75 to the existing city limits; thence South 230 feet 
with the existing city limits to the beginning. 

Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
J51.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall be- 
come a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
Temainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council" of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 5 members of the Council on the 15th day 
of December, 1970. 

_ K. DALE STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 

ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 



20 Years Ago . . . 



TRI-C0UNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 



DIXIE HIGHWAY 



CRITTENDEN, KY. 



"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING & REPAIR 

Trenching & Installation of Gas & Water Service 

824 6665 or 356-7477 



Lunsford Trucking-Blacklopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO LARGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 



MORNING VIEW, KY. 



356-7527 - 359-4667 




AUTOMATICALLY 

There's no reason for anyone to trip 

or take a nasty spill because someone 

forgot to turn on the Post Light. 

Now, there's a photo-electric switch 

to turn your electric Post Light ON 

at dusk, OFF at dawn, automatically. 

And while your automatic Post Light's 

cheery glow is a friendly neighborhood 

beacon ... it also helps discourage 

prowlers all night long. 

The ingenious little photo-electric 

device is simply affixed to the bulb's 

base before it goes into the socket. 

Ask your appliance dealer about 

the carefree operation of your Post 

Light with a photo-electric switch. 



The Union Light, Hefit and Power Company 






L_ 



JANUARY 11, 1951 

WALTON.-™_ 

Johnny Brakefield, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cameron Brakefield; local drug- 
gist, has returned to Purdue Univer- 
sity where he will continue his studies 
in Electrical Engineering, under the 
sponsorship of the U. S. Navy Train- 
ing program. 

The Walton Rotary Club received 
many compliments on the Christmas 
lighting project in town and they, in 
turn, wish to thank the many business- 
men for helping support this venture"! 

Mrs. H. F. Mann has returned to 
Walton after a visit with her sister, 
Mrs. Holton V Craig and Dr. Craig, 
in Ludlow. 

"Butch" Kent, son of Mrs. Eileen 
Kent, is confined to his home with 
the Chicken Pox. 

.» Last week more than 34 were in 
class at the Walton Baptist Church 
for study of the week, "The Bible and 
Prayer.". 

Pvt. John L. Hanks, a member of 
the AJ. S. Air Force, has arrived in 
Puerto Rico and reports having a 
wonderful time. He is the ' son of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Hanks. . 

Mrs. Katie Welsh and Mr. and Mrs. 
Nick Welsh were recent guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. James M. Bolington and 
daughter, Betty June, at Florence. 

Mrs. Mabel Johnson and daughter 
and Mr. and Mrs. D. K. Johnson were 
recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. 



Johnson of Latonia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stephenson 
are receiving congratulations over the 
arrival of a fine son, born January 2. 

Betty and Loretta Johnson have re- 
turned from a delightful visit with 
their grandparents in Austin, Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Roberts enter- 
tained at dinner several members of 
Mr. Robert's family. 

Mrs. John Feagan has returned to 
her home here after a visit with rel- 
atives in Brooksville. 
I Dclbert Northcutt, son of Mrs. 
LVvonia Elliott, has enlisted in the 
UVyS. Navy. 

INDKEENDENCE 

Mr. and Mrs. Alf B'Hymer and Mr. 
and Mrs. John Cain and family have 
returned home from Florida, where 
they spent a few weeks. 

Hubert Baird, of the Naval Reserve, 
has been in training in the south. He 
and his family returned home for the 
Christmas season, but left for the 
Pacific in January. 

A farewell party made up mostly 
of the young folks, members of the 
Independence Baptist Church Choir, 
was held last Saturday night in the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Elam 
for Virgil Maners, who was leaving 
for the Air Force. 

Work on the new Sunday school 
rooms and pulpit at the Christian 
Church is progressing rapidly in spite 
of the bad weather 



CARD OF THANKS— 

My heartfelt thanks, for the flowers, 
gifts, cards, phone callers and concern 
of my friends and pupils during my 
recent stay in Booth Hospital, and 
after returning home. A special thanks 
to Bro. Ennis, Rev. Russell, and Rev. 
Keith Creasy for their visits. 

Sincerely, 
lt-2c BURDETTA POWERS 



Thursday, January 14, 197T 
CARD OF THANKS— 

My appreciation to the churches 
and Sunday school classes, my fri- 
ends, for /Tlie. lovely cards, their gifts, 
flowers and phone calls while a pati- 
ent in the hospital; Rev. Russell for 
his visits. May God bless each of you. 
lt-2* —NELL C. CAMPBELL 

Walton's Beauty — Everyone's Duty 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1970-29- 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1970-28- 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing North Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interest of its citizens and for the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present north corporate limits of the City 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section 1. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 
city. 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 
BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, said point being in the 
West right-of-way line of U. S. 25 and being approximately 100 feet North of 
its intersection with Kentucky Highway 16; thence Northerly with the West 
right-of-way line of U. S. 25, 750 feet, more or less, to the line of Parker; 
thence Northwesterly with the line of Parker 3750 feet, more or less; thence 
Southwesterly with the line of West 350 feet, more or less, to the right-of-way 
of 1-75 northbound to 1-75 ramp; thence Southerly with the right of-way of 
said ramp 3040 feet to the East right-of-way line of 1-75; thence Southerly with 
the right-of-way line of 1-75, 850 feet, more or less, to the existing City Limits; 
thence with the existing City Limits for four calls Easterly 1200 feet, more or 
less; thence Southeasterly 1250 feet, more or less; thence Northeasterly 1350 
feet, more or less; thence Southeasterly 760 feet, more or less, to the beginning. 
Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon the passage thereof, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or-Agarfs^-thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 5 members of the Council on the 1 5th day 
of December, 1970. 

K. DALE STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 
ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing Westerly Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interests of its citizens and for the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present westerly corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section* 1. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 
city. 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing West City Limits, said point being 
650 feet, more or less, Northerly from the intersection of the West City Limits 
with Kentucky Highway 16; thence Northwesterly with the projection of the 
common line of Parker and West and with said line 3850 feet, more or less, 
of sufficient to reach the rear lot line of Parker; thence Northeasterly with the 
rear line of Parker 1250 feet, more or less; thence Southeasterly with the north 
tract line of Parker 3170 feet, more or less, or sufficient to reach the existing 
City Limits; thence Southwesterly with the existing City Limits 1360 feet, 
more or less, or sufficient to reach the beginning. 

Section '3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by-law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.100 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon the passage {hereof, the territory set out in detail jn Section 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will be henceforth con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 5 members of the Council on the 15th day 
of December, 1970. 

attwt t, a ,c V 5vt? A ^ STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 
ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 



VERONA AREA 




S5Vi ACRES — Ryle Road; modern farm house, all of 
the ground is clean and in excellent grass, .96 to- 
bacco base, dairy equipment goes with farm, also 
silage feed _ $28,000.00. 

NEW BRICK, just 3 years old, 3-bedroom brick, family 
room with fireplace, two baths, 2-car garage, city 
water, lot 95x300; owner transferred, must sell. 

—LISTINGS NEEDED— 

TOM HODGE REALTY 



VERONA, KY. 



PHONE 485-7362 



GOOD TIME GUARANTEE! 
Ebby Hoard of Midwestern Hayride 

APPEARING AT 

DON & JIM'S CLUB 

MOONLIGHT with the ebb tides 

Every Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday! 



2325 Anderson Road, Crescent Springs, Ky. 341-4161 



Homelite Chain Saw Dealer 

NOW OPEN IN INDEPENDENCE 

CABER'S SERVICE CENTER 

Repairs Most Makes of Chain Saws & Small Engines 

Hand Saw Sharpening by Machine, Includes Setting 
and Oiling — Reasonable Rates 

—SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY— 

Open Monday thru Friday, 8 a. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 

5253 Madison Pike, Independence, Ky. 



Accounts Insured 
To $20,000.00! 

WE PAY 

QUARTERLY 
INTEREST 

and the Highest 

Rates Allowable on 

the Following Accounts: 




2-Year Certificate* 

Par Annum 
$5000 Minimum 



6% 



12-Month Certificates f-l Q/ rtf 
Per Annum 074/0 
$1000 Minimum ^^ 



6-Month Certificates 

Per Annum 

$1000 Minimum 



3Va% 



Passbook Savings 
Per Annum 



5% 



R0SEDALE SAVINGS 



jCOL.KENNER'Sf 

| Appliance Co. { 

2 5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440 [ 

: s 

j SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS. Z 
■ REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS, ETC. 1 

(Oner 20 Years In the Service Business) 



BonkAmericord and Master Charge Honored 



Caroline & Southern Avenues 

Phone 431-7723 



Covington, Ky. 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG fir COLEMAN GAS & OIL STOVES! 



O 



Open Monday^ thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday *ond Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 






Thursday, January 14, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 




Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mum charge of 50c for 25 words or 
less— over 25 words, 2 cents per 
word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



FOR SALE— Angus bull. Telephone 
356-7354. 2t-lc 



For Sal 



FOR SALE— 2 dresses, size 11 and 12, 
one dark pink, one light pink; 2 
skirts, size 12, one straight, one 
pleated. Call 356-6487. lt-2* 

SEWING MACHINES — New 1970 
models, built in zig zag, makes 
buttonholes, sews on buttons, mends 
and darns; price reduced to $29.95 
cash price, or E-Z tenns available. 
Before Inventory Sale. For free de- 
livery, call 359-4720. 2t-lc 

FOR SALE — Locust fence posts, 45c 
and 75c, or will trade for hay. Call 
356-7629. lt-2* 

FOR SALE,— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. tf-49c 



FOR SALE— Mixed hay. Telephone 
356-2634. 3t2* 

NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE- 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cash registers, 
and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also carry 
ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. For free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. tf-8c 



FOR SALE— Small Ford V-8, com- 
pletely overhauled; '57 Jeep engine, 
$35.00; '17 jeep pickup, 4-whccl 
drive, needs engine; Mini mike, $40, 
or best offer. See at Route 1, Box 
436, just 2 miles South of Walton, 
on 25. lt-2* 

VACUUM CLEANERS— Tank type, 
with all regular cleaning tools, re- 
conditioned and runs good; $16.50 
cash price, or terms available. We'll 
deliver. Call 359-4720. 2t-lc 

FOR SALE — 6-ycar-old Apaloosa mare, 
registered. Best offer. Telephone 
356-2363. 3t-52* 

SEWING MACHINE — Brand new 
1970 model does all fancy work, 
even writes names, simply turn lever 
and sew. Price reduced to »$28.00 
cash price because of small scratches 
in shipping, or terms available. Call 
689-7936. 2t-lc 

VACUUM CLEANER— Paint damag- 
ed vacuum cleaners still in factory 
cartons, complete with all 7 cleaning 
tools. Reduced to $16.50 cash price 
or terms' available. Call 689-7936. 

' 2t-lc 

FOR SALE— 1956 Hotpoint refriger- 
ator, will make a good second re- 
frigerator. Call 485-4613 after 3:30 
p. m. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE— 80-acre farm, 6/10 to- 
bacco base, combination barn; near 
Big Bone Park; no house. M&W 
Realty, 341-0239. 2t-I* 

FOR SALE— 1970 Road Runner, 383, 
335 horse power, 4-speed, yellow 
with black interior. $2,000.00. Call 
356-2363. 3t-52* 



FOR SALE— Hay for bedding, 30c 
per bale; approximately 250 bales. 
356-7471. 2t-2* 



... FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



FOR SALE — , Four heavy springer 
Holstein heifers. O. J. Worthington, 
Highway 14, Pincr, Ky. Telephone 

356-9029. 2t-2* 

FOR. SALE— Charolais bull, 2 Vi years 
old; Sam 951 breeding. 485-7362. 

Tom Hodges. 2t-lc 

» 

FOR SALE — Used rcfrgerator, freezer, 
Maytag wringer washer; guarantee 
and deliver. 356-5440. lt-2c 

FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-§ engine, 
5-spced transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 

FOR SALE— 1970 Jacobsen 12 h. p. 
Chief tractor and 48-inch mower. 
356-9720 after 7 n, m. 3t 2c 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— Charolais bull, 10 months 
old. 356-2845. lt-2c 

REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

FOR SALE— Laying hens, 50 cents 
each. 356-2538. 2t-lc 

FOR SALE— Hay and straw. Tom 
Dickerson, Sunman, Ind. Phone 
■812-576-3322. 2t-2* 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-lOc 

FOR SALE — Argus 300 automatic 
slide projector, 6 slide trays includ- 
ed, excellent condition, $25.00. Call 
after 4 p. m., 356-2453. lt-2* 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing, 
all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 
249-A Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. 34-t20* 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impakv Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone, 
Ky. tf-47 

FOR SALE — Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vacciifeled. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

tf-2c 



Public Sale 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 16 - 10:30 A. M. 

at the 

Old Owenlon Elementary School 

The Owen County Board of Education will sell at 
Public Auction the following property: 

Old students' desks, several teachers' desks, book 
cases and shelves, file cabinets, chair-arm student 
desks, steam table, oil stove, tables, 2 food slicers, gas 
stove, small chairs, lots of kitchen utensils, old fashion 
water cooler, 1956 International pickup, good quantity 
of conduit, light fixtures, couch, folding metal chairs, 
waste cans, Hotpoint electric range, 2 mixers, 2 old 
dish cabinets, 2 electric heaters, 2 upright pianos, 
washing machine, old Singer sewing machine, and 
numerous other items. 

— Not Responsible For Accidents — 

TERMS— CASH 

tn case of inclement weather, will be held inside. 

Owen County Board of Education 



PAUL NOEL, AUCTIONEER 



section «jm 



That One Big Chance ... 

He spent his days at meager tasks 

Explaining all the while 
That soon he'd get that "one big chance" 

And then he'd live in style. 
But while he sought that "one big chance" 

He somehow failed to see 
The hundred "little chances" that 

Each day greet you and me. 
Me still waits that "one big chance" 

He'll never learn I guess 
That "little chances" are the rungs 

On ladders of success. — Dwayne Laws 



NOTICE- 



WILL TRADE — General registered 
Polled Hereford bull, 1 year and 8 
months old, for registered Hereford 
cow. 356-9846. 2t-2c 

NOTICE— Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 



PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. tf-34c 



Services— 



JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. tf-lc 

COLES BEAUTY SHOP — Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 



FOR SALE— Hay, 50c a bale; straw, 
90c a bale. 356-5306. lt-2c 

FOR SALE or TRADE— House with 
approximately 1 acre of land. Call 
485-4652. 4t-52* 

FOR SALE— Good mixed hay. Call 
356-2448. 2t-l* 

FOR SALE— Pigs, 2 months old. Call 
356-9964 after 4 p. m. 4t-51* 

FOR SALE-I965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 



TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coa! & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE— 1966 Super Sport Chev- 
elle, V-8, 4-speed, bench seats, four 
chrome wheels, tach. Call 359-4669 
for information. 2t-l* 



For Rent— 



FOR RENT— Three 2-room furnished 
apartments; 2 sleeping rooms; adults 
only. Call ater 5:00 p. m., 485- 
4536 or 485-7319. 85 North Main 
St, Walton. tf-52c 

FOR RENT— Three-room unfurnish- 
ed apartment, city water, electric, 
presses, large porch, on 2nd floor, 
in Independencse. Call 356-2687. 

2t-l* 



Wanted- 



WILL DO ironing in your home. 
Katherine Hopperton, 85 High St, 
Walton, Ky. 2t-2* 

WANTED— Baby sitting, responsible 
teenager. Debbie Soden. Phone 
356-2758. 2t-2c 

WANTED — Farms and country 
homes. Any condition, cash buyers 
waiting. Free appraisal. Will come 
to your property at any time. Rel 

--S,.(Buck) Waw", v »6<f06£. Wc 
specialize in the sale of "farms and 
country homes. ^ 6t-51c 



WANTED TO BUY-Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 

HELP WANTED— Someone to man- 
age a service station, locally. Call 
471-6831, or after 6:00 p. m, call 
662-1940. 2t-2c 

DRIVERS NEEDED-Train now to 
drive semi truck, local and over the 
road. Diesel or ga; experience help- 
ful but not necessary. You can earn 
over $4.50 per hour after short 

, training. For application and inter- 
view, call 513-241-5572, or write 
Safety Dept, United Systems, Inc., 
c/o Motor Freight Terminal Bldg, 
3101 Gano Road, Sharonville, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 45241. 2t-)c 

WANT TO RENT— Tobacco base, 
around Crittenden, Bracht or Wal- 
ton. Call 356-5652. 2t-2* 

WANTED— Cash for any kind of 
real estate, regardless of price or 
condition. Rel S. (Buck) Wayman, 
356-5068. tf-51c 

WANTED — Tenant for large farm; 
3.6 acre tobacco base; must have 
own equipment. Phone 485-4553. 
Mb. J. C*. Acree. lt-2c 

SEMI DRIVERS— Equal Opportunity 
—Experience helpful but not neces- 
sary, we want to train men our own 
way. Minimum age 21, good phy- 
sical condition. You can expect to 
earn well over $200.00 weekly, local 
or over the» road. For application, 
write, Consolidated Systems, P. O. 
Box 40456, Indianapolis, Indiana, or 
call 317-784-1348. 2Mc 

WANTED— Child to care for in my 
home; must be over 3 years old. 
Verona area. Good care. Phone 
493-5354. lt-2e 

HELP WANTED— Male, electric ex- 
perience necessary; hill or part 
time; good salary. 485-7244. 2t 2* 

HELP WANTED— Full or part time. 
Men or women; unlimited oppor- 
tunity. 485-7560, 371-5023. 4t-l» 

The -(."'d :«• -aertly a bridge; we 
are to pass over it, and not to build 
your dwelling on it. 



LIVESTOCK HAULING — Robert 
Richardson, 356-6749 or 291-8370. 

16t-44* 

WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists, radios and stereos. 9:00 a. m. to 
6:00 p. m. Phone 485-7616. tf-46c 

«p : 

DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. V igs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Der.a and Shirley. . tf-41c 

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf 29c 

SEPTIC TANKS— Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS— Precast; sales 
and installation. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. , tf-33c 

ELOISE BEAUTY SALON— 125 S. 
Main St, Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS— For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC 
IATION, 30 Needmore St, Waiton,/ 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 

Officer: When I saw you come 
around that corner I said to myself, 
"45 at least!" Woman driver: You're 
wrong. This dress just makes me look 
older. 



STEWART'S CUSTOM FARM 
WORK— Plowing, disking, grass 
seed sowing, mowing and baling 
hay, posthole digging. Call for 
free estimate. Phone 356-5700 or 
356-9905. ' tf-13c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE- 
Now written to everyone, if driv- 
ing record is good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington, Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cox 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m„ 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. tf-38c 

LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON— Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
49 3- 5 1 66. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO.- 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac- 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home- 
Owners Fire Policy & Business. 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Oc 

BUILD UP ROOFING — Shingles, 
gutter work, patch work of all kinds. 
New -oof warranty. Free estimates. 
Phone 356-9853 or 356-7100. 

20t-39* 

FASHIONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, personal 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fasbionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 



thanks 



for helping 
us help 



+ 



YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER— In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines as 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights, Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoovei 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and. vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Guard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 yean in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 



9:00 to 8:00. 



.tf-29c 



INTERIOR PAINTING 

EXPERTLY t>ONE 
—FREE ESTIMATES- 
RALPH FOLTZ, 356-5987 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 




But • • .You can talk to us about 

a personal loan to clean 

them up In a hurry! 

Fast, confidential 

service — bank rate, 

budgeted repayments. 




Dixie State Bank 



Save by Mail! 



Walton, Ky. 

Phone 485-4121 




Interest Checks Mailed Semi-Annually 



Member F. D. I. C. 
Accounts Insured to $20,000.00 



i 






Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 14, 1971 




NEW YEAR SPECIALS 




Men's Button & Slip-On Sweaters, 
reg. values to 12.98 now $4.00 

Boys' Flannel Shirts Special 99c 

Short Sleeve Sweat Shirts, 
colors and white $1.44 

Girls' Little Fur Muffs only $2.00 

Girls' Sweaters % Off Reg. Price 



Men's Zip Lined All Weather Coats now $7.77 



Teens Tarn & Mitten Set only $4.98 

Special All Girls Winter Coats 



Boys' Zip Lined All Weather Coats now $3.00 Reduced One-Third 



*•> 



Benton -Bonar 



65 N. Main St., Walton, Ky. 



Ladies' Coats Reduced One-Third 

1 Group Ladies' Shifts only $2.00 

Reg. 4.98 Satin Bed Pillows $2.98 

Phone 485-4495 Toss pi |, ows Specia | 99c to $ 1-98 ea< 



x: 



Drivers, Meet The 
Ky. Point System 

~ If you're like the majority of Ken- 
tucky drivers, you've probably never 
examined the rhale-up of Kentucky's 

point system unless you've received a 
ticket for a traffic violation. Then, 
the questions begin: 

How many points can be accumulat- 
ed before one loses his license? How 
long does it take to clear points from 
one's driving record? What can be 
done if one's license is lost? 

"The point system, contrary to pub- 
lic opinion, seeks to identify and im- 
prove problem drivers rather than 
punish them," according to Lt. Roger 
Wilhoite, director, of Driver Licens- 
ing. The system, initiated in 1957 
has been twice revised. 

Major violations and their point 
•values are: * 



. RACING— 

1st offense, 90-day suspension. 

2nd offense, 1-year suspension. 

3rd offense, 3-year suspension. 
SPEEDING— 

Under 16 MPH over speed limit, 
— 3 points. ; ; 

16-25 MPH over speed limit. 6 points. 

62 MPH over speed limit, 90-day sus- 
pension. 
Passing in area designated as "No 

Passing" zone, 5 points. 

Reckless driving, 4 points. 

Running stop sign or electric sig- 
nal, 3 points. 

Driving too fast for road conditions, 
but under the posted speed limit* 3 
points. 

When one amasses six points on the 
driving record, he receives a warning 
letter from the Division of Driver 
Licensing. With the accumlation of 
8 through 11 points, another letter is 
sent, advising the driver that he is 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne— 635-2895 




Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pond 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 



AUCTION 

BUTLER AUCTION HOUSE 

BUTLER, KENTUCKY PHONE 472.2880 

Paint - Brushes - Rollers - New & Used Furniture - Stoves • Rugs 

CARL LANCASTER 

AUCTIONEER-BROKER 
We Conduct Private Soles We Buy, Sell and Trade 



Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax report service 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where 1971 changes were taught. 
He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE! 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 1 Mile South of Walton 

Phone 356-2172 



GRAND OPENING 

Saturday, January 16, 1971 
HUNGRY JACK'S SMORGASBORD 



= $1.00 



FLORENCE, KENTUCKY 

A Host of Superb Salads and Hot Foods, Plenty \| QA I 
of Desserts and Beverages— Eaf All You Wish! 'Jjjy | 

NIGHT You Cant Eat At Home For Tnis Low ' IjOW NIGHT 
j SUNDAY Pnce— Brin * *« Famfl J rI SUNDAY j 

■ 

j Greater Cincinnati's Most Outstanding Smorgasbord j 

j May We Suggest You Give Us A Try and Come Back j 



■ 



8048 Dixie Highway, Florence, Kentucky 

(Industrial Park) Phone 571-8156 

FORMERLY OLD FARM SMORGASTERIA 



placed on "probation" and must have 
a personal interview with a Driver 
Improvement officer. If the driver fails 
to comply, his driving privileges are 
suspended for 30 days 



-DEATHS 



HOMER OSBORN 

Services for Homer Osborn, 90, of 
22 High School Court, Walton, were 
held at 2:00 p. m., Wednesday at the 
Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home, 
Walton. Burial v.'is in the Walton 
Cemetery. 

Masonic services were held at 8:00 
p. m., Tuesday. 

Mr. Osborn died last Sunday in a 
Hazard hospital. He had been visit- 
ing his son, Dr. Homer Lee Osborn, 
a Hazard dentist, when he became ill. 

Survivors include two daughters, 
Mrs. Myrtle Little of Rocky Pine, 
Ohio, and Mrs. Edna Dickerson of 
Beaver Lick, and a son, Homer Lee 
Osbom. 

For years Mr. Osborn served as 
custodian of the Walton school and 
later and the Walton-Verona school, 
and was a friend to all the students. 
He was a fine old gentleman. 

MRS. MARGARET FORNASH 

Mrs! Margaret Fomash, 59, Beaver 
Road, Walton, died Wednesday of 
last week at St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
Covington. 

She is survived by her husband, 
Porter Fomash; a daughter, Mrs. 
Kathryn Conrad, of Williamstown; 
two sons, Donald Fomash of Sparta, 
and Marvin Fomash of Walton. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
last Saturday at the Eckler Funeral 
Home, Dry Ridge. Burial was in the 
Williamstown Cemetery. 




RE- CL A /AfeO "3RA6C " 

TAN WOBLP WAIZir,(2Eri|ZEI7 

MILirARY OFFICERS WHO WEpS 
C \LL£P 0ACK. IUTO SERVICE WEEE 
KUOWM AS'RETREAPS" BECAUSE 
THEY MAP BEEW OlVEM "NEW UFE". 




F ''TV V£AK£OL£> 

r,L'TREAr/EP TIRES HAVE BEEN 
COMMONPLACE FOR MORE THAW SO 
> AE.5- THE FIRiT'KE-TPEADS'uutRE JUST 
1 ■' T-1>!fc TKEAD WAS TAKEM FROM ouf. 
TiSI! TMAr MAV HAVE HAD A PAMAGEP 
CASIU& AMP FI)fEP TO A GOOP CASIW6 
WITH WORM TREAPS. ,^ ^ _-^y 




. V V..'.. 

•V 7AV, RETREAPS ABE SO APVANCE? 

- £Y M?E COMMOUtV USEP ON 
COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT. TRUCKS - 
/MJ(? EVEN SUPER FAST RACIMGCAR* 




rXCCORPINGTOTHE RETREADIM& 
*/VPUSTRY ACTIOM COMMITTEE, 
TOPAY'S MOTORIST CAM SAW Money" 
VvirH COMFIPEMCE WITH THE NEW 
BfZtEO OF RETREAD TIRE5 P6SI6«P 
TO MSET THE SAME STANPARPS, 
SAFE!* - AMP EFFICIENCY AS NEW TIRE*. 




Sfaffordsburg 

Mrs. J. A. Keency, Reporter 

Mrs. Denver Binder enjoyed a few 
days visit with Mr. and Mrs. Clinton 
Henry in Miami, Fla., during the 
holiday season. 

We regretted to hear of the ser- 
ious accident which happened to R. 
G. Hinsdale at Spartansburg, S. C. 
The last word that we heard was that 
he is improving and hopes to soon be 
able to return to Kentucky. 

Carsee Brinkley returned to his 
home Dec. 26th after spending six 
weeks in the hospital following surg- 
ery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Huff, who have 
lived several years in Lexington, have 
come to make their home in Kenton 
County on South Taylor Mill. 

Mrs. Charles Losey.who has been 
quite ill, is much better. 

We were glad to have Bruce Wal- 
lace of Walton, show a couple of in- 
teresting films at the church here on 
Sunday evening, January 3. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Binder and 
Elwood spent Christmas wth Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Willoughby in Florida. 
Thelma and Elwood returned this 
week to pack and move their furni- 
ture. 

We were saddened by the sudden 
death of Joseph B. Richardson, Dec. 
29th. He had been under the care 
of a doctor for several months, but 
seemed to feel as good as usual. 

Miss Tina Marshall is somewhat im- 
proved but still in Booth Hospital. 

Mrs. Don Keeney and Stephen, 
Mrs. G. A. Damon and Mrs. Francys 
Keeney visited the conervatory in 
Eden Park, January 3rd. 

He — Say, I'm a self-made man. 
She— Well, it certainly is nice of you 
to take all the blame. 



108 ACRES — 2 bedroom modern home with aluminum 
siding, attached garage, 1.25 tobacco base, 1,000 
feet frontage, blacktop road _ „ $25,750.00 

50 ACRES— 500' frontage, blacktop, lays excellent, all 
in grass $800.00 per acre 

VERONA— 32 acres with 2 large lakes, to be sold in 
tracts of 5 acres and larger.™ $1,000.00 per acre 

WALTON — 4 rooms and bath, attached garage, large 
lot with drilled weH, in country $9,500.00 

WE HAVE many small tracts of land, in various sizes. 
Call us for more information. ^ 

R. P. COLEMAN REALTY 

7801 U. S. 42 - Florence Kentucky 
Phone 371-6600 

Charles K. Branum - Phone 371-4082 



DO YOU KNOW ... 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As Low As $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market 



CLEARANCE SALE 



MEN'S JACKETS— Several Styles, Some Corduroys with Fuzzy Linings, 
Sizes from 32 through Size 54 $3.49 to $6.99 

MEN'S CHUCK-A-BOOTS— Broken Sizes. _ Reduced to $5.99 

LADIES' SWEATERS— Many Styles and Colon..-*. $3.99 to $5.99 

LADIES' SHOES— Not All Sizes in All Styles; good values $1.99 to $2.99 

BOYS' PANTS— Some Colored Denims, sizes 8 thru 18 $2.99 & $3.49 

GIRLS' DRESSES— Ideal for School $1.99 to $3.99 



FOOD MARKET 



Lb. 49c 



BALOGNA— Very Tasty. 

JOWL BACON-Whole Pieces 4 Lbs. $1.00 

CELERY— Per Stalk ..... _ ...._ ifjc 

HEAD LETTUCE „_2 Heads 25c 

TRASH BAGS— For 20-gallon Cans (Save 30c) • 39c 

INSTANT POTATOES— Mr. Spud 2 Pkgs. 25c 

BARQS DRINKS— Mix or Match— Root Beer, Creme Soda, Grape, 
Orange, Lemon-Lime 2 cartons of 6 16-oz. $1.00 plus deposit 

MEYER'S DEPT. STORE & FOOD MART 

CORNER MOFFETT & OLD DECOURSEY ROADS 

KENTON, KENTUCKY 



Thursday, January 14, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



n 



An obstreperous diner was making 
a nuisance of himself banging on the 
table with his cutlery. "The service 
here is terrible," he shouted. "Look 
at my glass — it's empty." He glared at 
one of the j waiters. "What do I have 

to do to get some water?" One quiet 
waiter leaned over and whispered in 
his ear, "Why don't you set fire to 
yourself?" 



SAFETY IS OUR 
BUSINESS 



SEPTIC TANKS 

I 

Installation & Repair 

Precast Cisterns and 

Backhoe Work. 

356-5804 

__ 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 

U. S. Congressman 

4th District, Kentucky 



The National Transportation Safety 
Board has just issued a report illus- 
trating to me that it is almost futile 
for government to try to regulate 
safety if the human beings involved 
persist in careless habits. 




COMPLETE GRINDING & MIXING SERVICE 

We have^fust installed a new truck hoist system for 
our grinding operation. This eliminates the shoveling 
_of corn. Give us a try. 



BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 



WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 356-2172 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
January 13th and January 27th. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 

Your Collection Point Representative: 
Boone County— George Boh 3 71 .5004 

Grant County— Donald Conrad- 824-6551 

Campbell County— Bruce Trapp 635-5129 

Kenton County— George Bach 356-6278 



-NOTICE- 

Need Guns, Ammo or Gun Repair! 

Smith & Wesson 38-cal. # 2" 4" and 5" barrel 
Smith fir Wesson 32-cal., 3" barrel 
Haws & Iver Johnson 22-cal. Revolvers 
High Standard Derringer, 22-cal. 
Titan 25-cal, Automatics 
Also Other Guns — New and Used 
BUY - SELL - TRADE 

Red Dot Powder _ „ $2.00 per lb. 

STOP BY & CHECK MY PRICES 
Rifle Scopes - _ 20% Off 



Military Rifles Sportized Plain or Fancy 



The report concerns a charter air- 
craft that crashed with the loss of six 
lives because men operating a fuel 
truck at an airport filled the tanks 
with the wrong kind of fuel. 

The plane was a piston-engine type 
which required gasoline and oil. The 
filler caps on the gasoline tanks were 
plainly inscribed that 100 octane fuel 
should be used. The men who filled 
the tanks with jet fuel failed to look 
or read the inscription. 

Compounding their error, they add- 
led 57 quarts of piston engine oil to 
the engines. It should have occurred 
to them that a plane using jet fuel oil 
would not need piston engine oil. 

Even this might have been corrected 
if the men in charge of the aircraft 
had been observant. However, the 
first officer of the plane supervised the 
fueling. The fuel truck and the tank 
on the truck were both plainly labeled, 
in large letters, that it contained turbo 
jet fuel. The ^ first officer did not 
observe this. 

The captain of the aircraft then 
signed a receipt which was plainly 
marked in large letters that it was for 
JET fuel. 

The aircfaft took off and exper- 
ienced almost immediate loss of power, 
crash landed on a highway, and was 
destroyed. 

The Board now suggests that air- 
craft gas tanks and .fuel hoses be 
color-coded in the hope that those 
responsible will match the color of 
the hose nozzle with the color of the 
filler cap. 

I question whether this or any of 
the hundred other safety regulations 
the Federal Government issues will 
be of great value if people refuse to 
take simple ordinary precautions. 



CLEVELAND GUN SHOP 

805 Cox Road, Off Taylor Mill Road, 
Near Cherokee Shopping Center. Open Daily! 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 16, 1971 
Time: 1:00 P. M. 

On Rice Pike at the J. R. Noell Farm. Take Route 
42 to Rice Pike, and watch for auction sign. 

Due to health, we have sold our farm and listed to 
sell at auction ali of our — 

Farm equipment, cattle, com and hay, Ford tractor, plows, culti- 
vators, 6-ft. mower, tandem disk, corn planter, New Holland tobacco 
setter, lime spreader, rubber tired wagon, manure spreader, horse culti- 
\ator, horse mowing machine, lumber, old harness, water pump, cream 
and milk cans, drums, log chains, fence stretchers, coal burning stoves, 
lanterns, all kinds of small tools, axes, shovels, hoes, forks, picks. Many 
other small articles too numerous to mention. Some house furniture. 
Ten cows, 2 heifers, bred, 1 open, 1 Holstein boll, 2 years old, 5 bull 
calves, 1 on bucket. These cows have been tested. Approximately 300 
I msh c b of corn, some mixed hay. 

TERMS— CASH 

MR. & MRS. J. R. NOELL 

OWNERS 
(Not Responsible For Accidents) 

BROWN & BURCHAM, AUCTIONEERS 
Percy Ryle, Clerk 



The 1971 ASC5 Farm 
Program Announced 

New information on the 1971 farm 
programs has recently been announced 
according to Jack Welch, Chairman of 
the Kentucky State ASC Committee. 
"First of all, the signup period for 
^the feed grain and wheat will be March 
first through April 9. Between now 
and March 1 we expect to announce 
all details of the program which will 
be operated under the new farm law, 
The Agricultural Act of 1970," Mr! 
Welch said. 

Final determinations on set aside 
acreages have not been made, but a 
tentative 20 percent set-Tiside for feed 
grain and a set-aside of between 60 
and 75 percent domestic wheat allot- 
ment have been announced. The set- 
asides for these two crops will not 
exceed 20% on feed grains and 75% 
on wheat. Decesion on the actual per- 
centages will be made before March 1 . 
"Set-aside is an important new con- 
cept," the ASC Committee Chairman 
said. Under the set-aside programs for 
feed grain and wheat, a participating 
farmer will set aside a certain per- 
centage of his base or allotment and 
put this acreage in a conserving use. 
He will also maintain his farm's con- 
serving base in conserving use. 

On his remaining cropland he will 
be free to plant whatever he chooses, 
except that he cannot grow crops 
which are under marketing quotas- 
Tobacco. A farmer in the feed grain 
or wheat program will receive set- 
aside payments whether or not he pro- 
duces the program crops. He re-em- 
phasized that participants in any of 
the programs— feed grain and wheat- 
have no acreage limitations on pro- 
duction other than the required set- 
aside acreage and maintenance of their 
farm's conserving base. 

For example, suppose a farmer has 
300 cropland acres, including a 100 
acre feed grain base and a 50 acre 
conserving base. Now suppose we do 
have a 20% set-aside for feed grains 
—remember, that 20% is still a ten- 
tative figure. The farmer sets aside 
20%— -20 acres of his feed grain base, 
maintains his 50 acres conserving base, 
and is free to plant the remaining 230 
acres to whatever crops he chooses, 
except he can't plant quota crop 
mentioned earlier. He can plant soy- 
beans g.rain sorghum, vegetables or 
speciality crops— which he figures will 
bring him the best returns for his 
investments. 

The example would be just as true 
for wheat participants. The important 
thing for farmers to remeber in plann- 
ing for 1971 is tha| the feed grain 
and wheat programs provide them flex- 
ibility in their farm management, al- 
lowing more efficient operations than 
the more restrictive programs of past 
years. 



Letter From Vietnam 



November 8, 1970 

They don't give us enough time to 

write to everyone back home, so I 

will write to the church so everyone 

will know what is going on. 

I miss you all very much and I 
wish I were with you now, but Uncle 
Sam doesn't think so. But soon I 
will be home to stay. 

Rev. Davis, I don't write letters so 
good, but I just wanted everyone to 



know that I am thinking of them and 
praying for them. 

You know I thought that I was liv- 
ing pretty hard, but Rev. Davis these 
people over here have nothing. There 
is water in their huts all the time. 
•Their water is not drinkable, and they 
have to beg the GI to give them 
food. I wish there was something I 
could do for these people. Everyone 
back in the States should be grateful 
for what they have because these 
people over here have nothing. 

Well, I better be going. We are 
getting ready to go back to the field. 



I'll see everyone soon, so take care. 
Love, 

Little Butch 
MERRY CHRISTMASI 

This letter was written by Arthur 
N. Ingram, a 1970 graduate Walton- 
Verona High School. His address is: 
Arthur N. Ingram, 405-72-6864, Co. 
A3D (506 AMBL), 101st Dirborne 
Division, APO San Francisco, Calif. 
96383. 

Courage is fear that has said its 
prayers. — Karle W. Baker 






Candid Weddings 

Color & Black & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main # Walton 
485-4046 



CHARLES HENRY & THE SPOILERS 

+ WITH THE FABULOUS MR. SPOONS 

AT FIRST & LAST CHANCE - ROUTE 17 

FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY 
January 15-16-17 & January 22-23-24 

Friday, 7:00 'til ? - Saturday, 8:00 'til ? 
Sunday, 5:00 'til ? 



THE SIGN OF FARMER JUSTICE, 
EQUALITY, AND STRENGTH" 





FARMERS REALIZE: 



1. Farm prices are at a drastically low level, (while producers' expenses are at 
an all time high). 

2. Conglomerate Corporations are buying out farm producers. 

3. Major feed companies are mushrooming vertical integration. 

4. These and many other factors are squeezing the commercial family farmer in- 
to non-existence. 



Must Ad NOW: 

1. Become a part of the dynamic NFO movement initiated at the 1970 convention. 

2. Take advantage of the unity md determination of neighboring farmers NOW— 
join NFO and become a participating membt. 

3. Stand behind NFO to raise your farm .prices. 

AND THIS, coupled with NFO's determination to take whatever steps necessary for 
commercial family farm, survival, is the turning point for rural America— we .must 
stand UNITED— once this Is accomplished, the major farm battle is won. Only 
farmers can change the chaos at the market place by using collective bargaininq 
through NFO. 

FARMERS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES* ARE SENDING AN URGENT 
PLEA FOR FARMERS TO UNITE. THE FACT IS NOW RECOGNIZED THAT 



ii 



NFO Is The Farmers 
Only Hope" 



ACTION 

NFO has initiated a three-fold attack for the 1971 farm battle — 

1. A. massive commodity lift to raise general price levels, (including red meat, 
grain, and specialities crops). 

2. Legislative action to stop vertical integration and packer feeding. 

3. Use every legal weapon available to achieve our goals. 

FARMERS WON THE BATTLE IN 1776 FOR THEIR FREEDOM; FARMERS MUST 
WIN THE BATTLE IN 1971 FOR THEIR SURVIVAL. 

Contact NFO Corning, Iowa 50841 
515-322-3131 

PROGRESSIVE FARMERS JOIN NFO 



Walton Advertiser, Wolton, Kentucky 

Two business men were talking. "Is second. "Last week we advertised for 

70ur advertising getting results?" asked a night watchman and the n*nt rngnt 

the first. "It sure it," moaned the we were robbed." 



Thursday, January 14, 1971 



LUMBER FOR SALE 

DAVIS SAW MILL fir LUMBER YARD 

Now in operation in Gallatin County, on the Sayers- 
ville Road. Barn patterns and rough lumber of all 
k(nds, now ready for your use, or 1,000 feet at reason- 
able prices. 
Day 567-5261 Warsaw, Ky. Night 567-2153 




Save On Admiral's Console Models 

20" Color TV : Sale Price $410.00 

(Regular Price $460.00) 

24" Color TV Sale Price $425.00 

(Regular Price $485.00) 

Sale Price $415.00 




The abusive attorney finally asked 
the witness how far he had been from 
the scene of the accident. ''Sixteen 
feet, 11 inches," was the reply. "How 



can you possibly be so exact?" roared 
the lawyer. "Well," drawled the wit- 
ness, "1 figured some fool would ask 
me, so I measured." 



2. 
3. 



24" Color TV 



(Regular Price $485.00) 

HURRY! 

Supply Limited! On January 15th 
This Sale Is Absolutely Over! 

COL RENNER'S 

Appliance Co. 

5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440 

Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m. 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 



THE BELL SYSTEM FAMILY THEATRE will present "Circus Time", 
at 7:30 p. m., January 29th on Channel 5— a colorful and intriguing look 
into the three-ring world of the big top. Jack Cassidy will host the pro- 
gram featuring the performers of the Ringling Brothres and Barnum and 
Bailey Circus. 



ASCS Urges Signup 
On Wool Program 

The 1970 wool marketing year end- 
ed December' 31th. Growers have a 
month or until February 1, 1971 to 
apply for payments on wool, unshorn 
lambs and mohair. Each grower is 
encouraged «to apply as soon as he 
completes his last sales of the year. 

Data from all timely filed applica- 
tions will be included in determing 



ELECTRIC SEWER 
CLEANING 

Ditches dug with new trenching 
machine, 4 to 10 inches wide and 
up to 30 inches deep, only 35c 
per foot. Pre-Cast concrete cisterns 
installed, and cisterns and septic 
tanks cleaned. 
F. J. LUCAS SANITATION CO. 



356-2315 



A 




THERE'S A 



BIG 6% 



IN YOUR 

FINANCIAL 

FUTURE! 



Good news! We've raised interest dividend 
rates as high as the law allows. Now, 
thanks to new Savings Certificate rates, 
your money can earn as much as 6%. 



6% 
5 



$5,000 Deposit 
2 Year Term 
O $1,000 Multiples 



1% 5 



$1,000 Deposit 
Year Term 
000 Multiples 



lf 4/U $1; 



$1,000 Deposit 
Months Term 
000 Multiples 



the first In Kentucky 

GENERAL 
SAVINGS 

the general savings and loan association, inc. 

6th & Madnon, Covington, Ky. • 291-7219 4501 Dixie Highway, Elsmere, Ky. • 34M848 




the national average price of wool and 
the payment rate. Most payments will 
be made in April but payments on 
applications received after the Feb- 
ruary 1 deadline may be dcyalud. 

If you have not fifed, please bring 
your bills to the county ASCS office 
at your first opportunity. 

If you have filed one or more ap- 
plications but later made additional 
sales, you will need to file a supple- 
mental application to receive payment 
for the additional sale. 

In addition, the ASCS reminds all 
farmers that they will be receiving a 
statement — CCC182 — on payments 
earned for 1970 from the USDA for 
income tax purposes. Anyone not re- 
ceiving a form 182 who has received 
payments from the USDA on any pro 
gram should get in touch with their 
ASCS office. These forms should be in 
the hands of the producers by the 
end of January. 

The woman lecturer was going 
strong. "For centuries women have 
been misjudged and mistreated," she 
yelled. "They have suffered in a 
thousand ways. Is there any way that 
women have not suffered?" As she 
paused to let that question sink in, 
it was answered by a voice down front. 
"Yes, there's one way," the masculine 
voice said. "They have never suffered 
in silence." 



LEGAL NOTICE OF ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

Sealed proposals, in duplicate, will be received by the City of Walton, Office 
of City Clerk, City Building, Walton, Kentucky, until 12:00 noon, EST, 
TUESDAY, January 19, 1971, for furnishing all labor and materials necessary 
for the construction of project titiled 

NEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
PORTER ROAD NEAR HIGHWAY 14 

WALTON-VERONA INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT 
WALTON, KENTUCKY 
Separate lump sum bids will be received on the following branches of the work: 
1. General Construction: Applicable sections of Division 1, and Divisions 
2 through 10 and Section 11-B. « 
Kitchen Equipment Applicable sections of Division 1, and Section. 11-A. 
Classroom and Office Furnishing: Applicable sections of Division 1 and 
Division 1 2. '. " f 

4. Plumbing Work: Applicable sections of Divisions 1 and 15. 

5. Electric Work: Applicable sections of Divisions 1 and 16. 

All bids shall be in accordance with drawings and specifications, as prepared 
bv Betz, Carey & Wright, Architects, 2616 Central Parkway, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 45214. 

The drawings and specifications are on file at the office of City Clerk, Walton, 
Kentucky, at the office of Architects, at the F. W. Dodge Corporation, Inc., 
2528 Kemper Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, and at the Allied Construction, Inc., 
1010 Yale Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Drawings and specifications may be obtained from the Architects by furnishing 
a deposit check of $50.00 per set, check made payable to Betz, Carey & Wright, 
Architects. Each bidder on the major branches of the work may obtain two 
(2) sets. Deposits will be refunded to each bidder on the major branches of 
the work who submits a bonafide Bid Proposal and returns the drawings and 
specifications in good condition within ten (10) days after the opening of the 
Bid Proposals. The cost of reproduction, handling and mailing will be deducted 
from the deposits of all other sets not so returned. 

LEGAL NOTICE 
A Bid Bond or certified check in the amount of ten per cent (10%) of the 
amount of the bid shall accompany the proposal. If certified check, make pay- 
able to City of Walton, Kentucky. A Contract Performance and Payment 
Bond shall be provided by each contractor to whom a contract for the work is 
awarded, on all contracts in excess of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00). Each 
Bond shall be in the amount equal to one hundred per cent (100%) of the 
contract sum. Bonds subject to approval of owner. Cost of Bond to be paid 
by the bidder. The City Council of Walton, Kentucky reserves the right to 
reject any and all bids and to waive information in bidding. Contracts will be 
awarded on the basis of the lowest responsible bid. Determination of awarding 
contracts will be made on -basis of the Base Bid, combination of Base Bids, 
plus or minus any Alternates that may be accepted by the owner. The owner 
reserves the right to reject anv and all Alternate Bids. 
2t-lc By: DAISY HILL, City Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 



BOB & DENNY'S AUTO BODY 

5824 MADISON PIKE . NICHOLSON, KY. 

Phone 356-2346 

—INSURANCE WORK— 

Free Estimates and Free Pickup and Delivery 

COMPLETE BODY & PAINT WORK 



B. C. e D. 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 




SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1970 



10:00 A. M. 



At the farm of Ken Dixon, on Lemon-Northcutt Road, 6 Miles North of Dry Ridge, 
Kentucky, in Grant County. 

Mr. Dixon has decided to quite the dairy business and will sell his entire dairy 
herd, on the above date. Also, 206-acre farm. 

46 head of dairy cattle and heifers, which include 31 head of Holstein, Brown Swiss, 
Ayrshire and Guernsey, mainly all Holstein, and 15 head of fine Holstein heifers. 

ONE OF THE BEST DAIRY HERDS IN GRANT COUNTY! The cows range in age 
from 3 to 8 years; 8 open cows, 20 have freshened in the last 3 months, and are 
bred back; rest to freshen soon. One cow gives 60 lbs. per day, 1 gives 56 lbs., 3 
give 52 lbs., 4 give 48 lbs., 4 give 40 lbs., 3 give 36 lbs., 2 give 32 lbs., 2 give 30 lbs., 
1 gives 28 lbs. All TB and Bangs tested. 

Also to hi offered at auction— 206-acre farm, .9 mile road frontage on the Lemon- 
Northcutt Road, fenced and cross-fenced into 7 different fields; large tobacco barn, 
also feed and dairy barn with 150-ton silage holder with feeder; a 5-room frame 
home. This farm has 4.8 acres corn base, 1.98 tobacco base, well watered. Here is 
a grazing farm. Also included with the farm is the milking equipment: Bulk tank 
and milkers; also 60 tons good silage. Buy this farm and start shipping milk. 

TERMS: On farm, 10% down day of sale, balance on or before 30 days or with the 
deed; on personal property, cash or check. 

^* ' SALE CONDUCTED BY 

COL. CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 



Realtors & Auctioneers 
AUCTIONEERS - 



431-4222 Covington-Williamstown 

COL CECIL WAYMAN & REL C. WAYMAN 



Gayle McElroy, Realtor, Walton, Ky. - 485-4297 



7i 



Thursday, January 14, 1971 



. 

Mother to son: I don't care if the 
basement vail is cracking. Quit telling 
everyone you come from a broken 
home. 




CHEATING 
OURSELVES 

Lesson for January 17, 1971 




Background Scripture: Matthew 13:44 50; 
Luke 14:15-24 

A father was bitterly lament- 
ing his son's refusal to go to col- 
lege. "I've tried to make him see 
what he*s passing up, but he 
wouldn't listen," the man ex- 
claimed. "Several years from now 
when he realizes that he can't 
get a decent job 
without a diplo- 
ma, he'll regret 
this choice — but 
then "it'll be too 
late!" 

We can appre- 
ciate the father's 
feelings. Yet, we 
also know that this 

tendency to pass- 
Rev. Althouse up golden oppor . 

tumties is typical of human na- 
ture. Many of us can look back 
upon many bad choices which 
Uday we can hardly understand 
having made. 

Deliberate wrong choices 

The fact of human nature is 
that we often make deliberate 
wrong choices. We know some- 
thing is good for us, but fail to 
make use of it, choosing some- 
thing else which, at the moment, 
may be more attractive. The child 
passes up spinach for candy, re- 
. ardless of his understanding that 
i pinach is good for him and can- 
< y.may not be. 

If only this perverse tendency 
ended with the termination of 
childhood, but it doesn't Adults 
continue to make these wrong 
choices, if on a more sophisti- 
cated leveL Some people are in- 
c ined to continually complain 
t at they "were behind the door 
v,hen the goodies were passed 
cut." There are times when we 
a -. q tempted to ask whether they 
were behind the door by accident 
or chose to be there! 

They made excuses 

..'esus is speaking of this human 
tendency in his parable of the 
great banquet. He is picturing the 
imaginary scene of the great 
t. nquet of the Kingdom of God 
v -ion the Messiah has come. This 
h what the people of Israel were 
waiting for with great eagerness. 
"V t, Jesus is picturing many of 
to people as choosing not to .go 
to the banquet when at last it 
c ■ ies. 

ldere are three typical ex- 
c os. One man has just bought 
a eld and he is anxious to see it. 
/ '.other has just purchased some 
en and is anxious to try them 
out. A third man has just married 
and wants to stay home. (Deute- 
i nomy 24:5 provides the follow- 
law. "When a man hath taken 
iew wife, he shall not go out to 
\ r, neither shall he be charged 
v (h any business, but he shall be 
f o at home for one year, and 
shall cheer up his wife which he 
iv th taken.") 

Jach knew what he was passing 
i \ yet chose a lesser good. Each 
> s determined to just what he 
v nted. Even though their ex- 
c.ement with a new field, a new 
s< t of oxen, or even a new wife 
i uld wear-off in time, still they 
p cferred these to the Kingdom, 
rhis seems incredible that any- 
<>i.<* should make such a choice, 
y t we make those kind of 
choices frequently in our own 
lies. Several months ago our 
church invited a speaker of na- 
tional reknown to address a spe- 
cial occasion. The speaker was 
known for the excellence of her 
i ssage and the compelling na- 
il* rj of her delivery. Her witness 
h- s changed many lives. 

Missing out 

The night of the special service 

came and the church was full. 

Yec, despite the "full house," I 

' e;lt a sense of regret in noting 

the • many people who had not 

cornt but who could have profited 

■jo luch by hearing her. The al- 

>U. natives many had chosen in- 

<r?yded a bridge club, bowling, 

Vb opplng, and a night in front of 

television set. 

/his is typical of the kinds of 

1 t'en opportunities which we al- 

i( v to slip by every day. It is 

< i not - a choice between 

* d" and "evil," but between 

s ■ lower and higher good. 

V l, for some perverse reasons 

we ( loose the lower good, it is 

oi Ves whom we are cheating. 

d on outlines copyrighted by the 

Or s . ot Christian Education, NollcrMil 

Cr I of the' Churches of Chriit In the 

Released by Community fr*H 

*ervce.) 



NEW BANKLICK 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

The good Lord has once again per- 
mitted us to resume our life on this 
earth another year. Yes, here it is the 
start of a new year — 1971, and as we 
read our newspapers and magazines we 
still see the same old problems from 
1970 are still with us. The war in 
Viet Narft is the most tragic of all, 
with so many of our young men in 
prisoner of war camps, and seemingly 
being ill-treated. Let us all add our 
repulsion against such inhumane treat- 
ment of our young men in the camps 
in North Viet Nnam. Let us be much 
in prayer for a quick solution to this 
war that should point to the right di- 
rection to stop other such wars in 
the near future. 

The New Banklick Baptist Church 
has much to be thankful for last year, 
1970, as the Lord has most assuredly 
given us more than we" deserved. He 
added to our church those who should 
be saved; and those who chose to 
join in the good fight of faith. He 
has blessed us financially this year 
more than any previous years. He has 
permitted us to have some of the 
finest men and women to lead in our 
church program; and we do expect 
more to take part in 1971. We are 
so proud of our youth in all their 



efforts in 1970. We are thankful for 
the mission opportunities that have 
been entrusted to our keeping. We 
encourage our readers to join us in a 
special prayer for 1971, that God will 
try us in greater ways that will be a 
blessing to others. 

We would like to reminisce just a 
bit of the most important blessings 
the Lord gave us in 1970 that are so 
vividly imprinted in our hearts. May 
we share them with you? 

First, was the ordination of Brother 
Carl Evans into the full Gospel Min- 
istry (pastor Rosedale Baptist Church 
in Latonia) in March. This was follow- 
ed by our Mission Conference in 
April with speakers like Mrs. Thelma 
Bagby from Brazil, Rev. Bertis Fair, 
migrant worker in the United States, 
Rev. Buford Dunavent, mountain 
missions in West Virginia, Rev. John- 
nie Lee, Area Missionary in Tennessee 
and Chaplain Robert L. Campbell of 
Viet Nam. What a wonderful World 
Mission Conference that was! 

Then we were blessed with the pur- 
chase of a new 67 passenger bus in 
May. This was followed in June with 
one of the finest Vacation Bible 
Schools we have recorded in the his- 
tory of our church. The enrolment 
was 267. This was not only a real 
blessing, but a great challenge with 
the shortage of workers and space. 

Then in August we had Brother 
Bob Utz and his 30 boys and girls 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 

Covington - Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
F. H. A. and Mortgages! 



HELP WANTED 



Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to — 

BORON STOP 338 

1-75 b 338 RICHWOOD, KY. 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 

Samples Shown In the Home 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED & INSURED 
—ACOUSTIC CEILINGS INSTALLED— 

M. SIMPSON - 341-7555 



WALLPAPER 

FOY JOHNSON FINE *AINT 

Picture Frames - All Sizes 

WALL-TEX ART SUPPLIES 



LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 

264 MAIN STREET FLORENCE, KY. 

—Parking In Rear — Phone 371-7921— 



LIFE BEGINS WITH A HOME OF YOUR S 
OWN. SEE FIRST 
FEDERAL FOR 
THE LOAN. 

^.RST^EDERAL 




Savinqs^Loan Association 

OF COVINGTON 
5th & Main Streets — Covington, Ky. 

ELSERE, KY.- LATONIA, KY. 

3715 Dixie Highway 36th & Decoursey Ave. 

DIXIE HIGHWAY— SOUTH OP WALTON 






■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■» 



from Wildwood, Florida who blessed 
our lives with their special musical 
presentation of "Good News." This 
was a first with our church. And an- 
other first came along in August with 
the organizing of our first Youth 
Choir. They have really come a long 
way under the able' direction of Mrss. 
Nancy Rentiers, Jackie Grayson, Fran- 
cis Beach, and Katherine Hopperton. 
They have sung in several churches 
and missions. They are one of the 
greatest blessing in our church that 
came along in 1970. 

Another of our great blessings was 
the Homecoming on Sunday, Sep- 
tember 20, with the Southern Aires 
and Brother Bob Hopkins (former 
pastor, 1958). The largest crowd in 
many years was present. Our Revival 
of ten days from September 21 thru 
30, with Evangelist Wallace E. Keown 
of Selma, Alabama, had one of the 
most uplifting effects seen in years. 
There were over 200 decisions made 
during this great revival. TniVy this 
was ONE OF THE GREAT 
MOMENTS in our church history. 

And finally we closed out our year 
with two great presentations: On Sun- 
day, December 20, our choirs, Junior 



Walton 

-a - 



Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



and Adult, presented a wonderful 
Christmas program at the Kyles Lane 
Sanitarium, and the Youth of our 
church blessed our hearts with a 
wonderful presentation of "The Christ- 
mas Story" ;and then on Wednesday 
night, the 23rd, a special musical pro- 
gram by both choirs was presented 
with the singing of many of our 
Christmas Carols and closed the pro- 
gram with several beautiful old Gospel 
numbers. Thus we come to the close 
of another year, and we pray that 
God's blessngs will be upon us all 
in 1971 



The pastor of New Banklick, James 
D. Johnson, staff, and members take 
this opportunity to thank you, our 
readers, for sharing these moments in 
our articles with us. May God richly 
bless you in all things .... 

Notes of Servicemen 

Pvt. Joseph W. Menefee is now 
taking AIT at Ft. Polk, La., after 
completing Basic Training and a Lead- 
ership Preparation Course at Ft. Ord, 
Calif. He recently spent a 14-day 
leave with friends and relatives. 



5-ROOM HOUSE with bath, pantry, full basement, 
outside garage, lot T 00x1 80, built-in kitchen, storm 
doors and windows, large garden, oil furnace, sew- 
age tap-in has been paid; located on the Walton- 
Nicholson Road. Price _ $15,225.00 

REEVES & DAY REAL ESTATE 

R. H. WORTHINGTON, SALESMAN— 823-7311 



$50.00 REWARD 

For arrest and conviction 
of person or persons for 
shooting windows at Sleet 
residence, Box 74-A, Per- 
cival Road, Walton, Ky. 



Attention Kenton County Taxpayers 

SPECIAL COLLECTION OFFICE 

INDEPENDENCE COURTHOUSE— Thursday, 9:00 a. m. to 3:00 
p. m. and Saturday, 9 a. m. to 12 noon. Please bring your Tax Bill. 

COVINGTON OFFICE— Monday through Friday, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 
p. m., Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 12:00 noon. 



JOSEPH L NIE 



SHERIFF OF KENTON COUNTY 



COVINGTON, KY. 




Sunday 

• Revelation 
79.11-73 

Monday 

• John 

6:66-69 

Tuesday 

• John 
15.7-7 

Wednesday 

• John 
17:1-8 

Thursday 

• Acts 
13.24-33 



Someone has said the eyes are the windows of the soul. 
And when it's our own child — how easy to believe that In those 
sparkling eyes we have seen and understood an infant soul. 

Well, we have seen a mind eager to grow . . . character ready 
to be molded. 

If in our child's eyes we would see his soul, then one thought should 
possess us: This is a soul known to God but not yet knowing God. 

Soul-searching is always the threshold to spiritual growth. The 
need we recognize in a baby's eager eyes is a need adult souls never 
outgrow. 

Remember as you plan your family's religious future: God knows 
•ach and every human soul. The We He has given us is our opportunity 
to know Hun, 



■ 



Friday 
Acts 

20:28-35 



Saturday 
• II Corinthians 
5:18-21 



t^turaMiectodbytheAfMrkMBfcte&xMy 
OofiyrtjjMWt Keistcr AdvwtUIng Serrfce, Inc, Strobing, Vtrglnta 



The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 

ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 



Phone 485-4600 North Main St, Walton 

BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PEOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

Phone 485-4898 Walton, Kentucky 

BENTON-BONAR DEPT. STORE 

Phone 4854495 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phone 356-2172 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or 371-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Kentucky 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 356-3981 Nicholson, Kentucky 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

Phone 4854121 Walton, Kentucky 



HALL ELEC. b APPL. SERVICE 

Phone 485-4087 Walton, Kentucky 

MOTCH— JEWELERS 

613 Madison Avenue Covington, Kentucky 

READNOUR COAL & FEED 

Phone 489-4504 Walton, Kentucky 

ROBERTS INSURANCE, INC. 

485-4693 or 485-7262 Walton, Kentucky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ab" Ryan 4854161 Walton, Ky. 

ST, CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 485-9111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 4854962 "Your Local Newspaper" 

WALTON HDW. & DRY GOODS 

Phone 4854009 Cliff Ryan, Prop. 

WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 

Phone 4894193 Walton, Kentucky 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 14, 1971 



WALTON-VERONA HIGH SCHOOL 

Name— Ht. Wt. 

Mike Ferguson 



BEARCATS 

Age CI. 



Ronnie Huffman 

Ricky Goldsbeny 

Bobby Messmer .. 

Pat Glenn 

r* 

Mike Sargent 

Gary Ingram 

Mills Rouse 



Mike Ramsey 

Ricky Raybourne 
Sherman Thorpe 

Gene Dixon 

Marvin Ingram _ 
Gary Akins 



Tommy Farwell _ 

Dwight Johnson 

Richard Burnett _ 
Timmy McCubbin 
John Wilmhoff __ 

Jimbo Bowling 

Harold Robinson _ 

Terry Cady 

Greg Coyle 



6-2 

6-3 

6-1 

6-3 

6-0 

5-8 

6-2 

5-11 

6-2 

5-11 

5-8 

5-10 

5-7 

5-11 

5-10 

. 5-10 
6-1 
5-7 
6-0 
5-7 

. 5-7 
5-11 
6-1 



180 


17 


12 


157 


17 


12 


160 


18 


12 


211 


16 


11 


170 


17 


1Z 


137 


17 


12 


137 


17 


12 


152 


16 


11 


218 


16 


11 


152 


16 


11 


139 


16 


11 


142 


16 


11 


102 


14 


10 


150 


16 


11 


139 


15 


10 


157 


15 


10 


145 


15 


10 


125 


15 


11 


148 


16 


10 


128 


16 


11 


138 


-15 


10 


137 


15 


10 


140 


15 


10 



SIMON KENTON BASKETBALL 



Player — 

Greg Rust 

Steve Leistner 
Tom Due 



Marty McMillan 

Bill Payne 

Dennis Haynes — 

Randy Davis 

Greg Halderman 

Joey Martin 

Don Ellis 



Po. 

F 
F 
F 
F 
C 
G 
G 
G 
G 



ROSTER- 

Ht. Wt. 



-1970-71 

Yr. No. 



John Heeger 
Rodney Ballard 
Steve Barnett _ 



Richard Fehler 

Mark Ficke 

Mark Jolly 

Ken Klingler __ 

Lanny Mallord 
Gary Peddicord 

Steve Pettit __ 

Mike Pope 

Kevin Tallant _ 



6-3 


195 

170 


11 

12 


43 
33 


6-0 


167 


11 


22 


5-11 


145 


11 


14 


6,3 


165 


10 


23 


6-7 


245 


12 


44 


5-11 


158 


12 


10 


6-3, 


182 


10 


31 


5-10 


150 


10 


20 


5-11 


165 


12 


32 


6-5 


190 


11 


42 


541 


160 


10 


30 


5-10 


145 


10 


13 


5-11 


160 


10 


24 


6-1 


140 


10 


32 


?5-ll 


160 


10 


34 


6-2 


160 


10 


40 


5-8 


140 


10 


12 


5-10 


140 


10 


10 


5-9 


140 


10 


11 


6-1 


160 


10 


21 


5-9 


155 


10 


31 



January Meeting of 
Capf. Lillard DAR 

The January meeting of Gapt. John 
Lillard DAR was at Harp House where 
a Dutch Lunch was served at the 
noon hour. 

The regent, Mrs. Charles Allphin 
reviewed the President Generals' New 
Years message. "Our most important 
accomplishment has been the contin- 
ued net increase in membership. The 
National Headquarters is aware of the 
problems faced by local chapters in 
dealing with the press. A series of 
official statements indentified as 
"Press Guidelines" has been issued. 

In the National Defense program, 
Mrs. T. A. Perry warned us about the 
rise of military power in Russia. Vice 
Admiral Rickover said, "The Soviet 
Union is working toward supremacy 
in sea power. Their submarine fleet is 
three times larger than our own. Their 
navy is operating in all oceans of the 
world, and their submarines are off 
both coasts of America." 

The flag chairman, Mrs. Abram 
Hedges, said the flag should never 
be draped over any moving vehicle, 
such as car ,train or boat. 

The various committees worked to- 
gether in making of the annual re- 
port which is to be sent to the State 
and National Society the first of 



Announcing the opening of Kentucky's newest 
most modern, locally owned & operated truck dealer: 




INC. 



Where the trucks are! 




























Come in and meet Bob Ringo, 
president of Trux, Inc., from Ft. 
Mitchell, Kentucky. Bob not only 
knows trucks inside and out, but 
also knows Kentuckians. It's why 
you'll find dealing with Trux a 
better deal all the way around. 



In Full Operation January 25th ! 

A Complete Sales & Service Facility Specializing in GMC Astro Tractors and Dorsey Trailers! 

If you're in the market for a new tractor, trailer, or truck (or a whole fleet of them), then Trux is 
the best thing that could have happened to you. 

That's because Trux goes to great lengths to give you the best equipment for your money. 

Choose from GMC trucks, GMC Astro tractors, and Dorsey trailers. 

They're all built to take it, no matter what. 

And Trux is well equipped to service what it sells. With hours to suit you. Not us. 

Trux can also take any old equipment you might have off your Fands in trade. And for a fair price. 

What's more, Trux will also arrange the financing without a lot of unnecessary red tape. 

In short, you'll like our way of doing business. 



Win a Brand-New Color TV! 



When you come see our com- 
plete line of 1971 GMC trucks, 
GMC tractors, and Dorsey trail- 
ers—don't forget to enter our 
TV SWEEPSTAKES. There's ab- 
solutely nothing to buy. And who 
knows? You could be the winner 
of a brand-new 16" Zenith por- 
table color television. Hurry 
though! 



TRUX 




How to get toTRUX, Inc. 




trux 




Trux Is conveniently located from almost 
anywhere in the area. Just take 1-75 and 
head for the Greater Cincinnati Airport. Get off at the Donald- 
son Road/Airport exit and go west to Hartman Road. You'll 
find us only a few feet from the exchange. 



IMC« The fctfiwind-frtendljf truck people. 

" Donaldson Road and h75. P.O. Box 69, Ertanger, Kentucky 41018 • Telephone: 342-8500. 





"To be, or not fo bo," 
As the immortal bard implied 
Could find a quick solution 
In the classified! 



February. The chapter has made the 
National Honor Roll every year since 
it was organized in June 1942. 

The Fifth and Sixth Districts will 
be hosts at the seventy-fifth annual 
Kentucky State Conference of the 
DAR at the Phenix Hotel in Lexing- 
ton, March 23, 24 and 25th. State 
regents from North Carolina and Miss- 
issippi will be present. 

Members present were Mesdames 
Charles Z. Allphin, Ivan Clements, 
Abram Hedges, John Juett, Winston 
Mason, Sally F. Odor, T. A. Perry, 
Fdgar McNabb, G. L. Points and 
Misses Martha Blaine, Laura Dicker- 
son, Zayda Clore, Elizabeth Flege, 
Louise Flege and Mary Kenny Shipp. 

Walton Homemakers 

The Walton Homemakers Club 
held their January meeting in the 
home of Mrs. Donald McMillian of 
29 Chambers Avenue. 

The business meeting was conduct- 
by Mrs. Paul Bcighle, president. The 
Homemakers Creed was read by the 
members. The devotional was given 
by Mrs. John Hetterman, "Love 
Changes Things." 

The lesson, "Wool Yarn Pillows," 
was a most interesting lesson taught 
by Mrs. Claude Burnes. 

The February meeting will be held 
in the home of Mrs. Donald Rice, 
22 Alta Vista. The lesson, "Annual 
Flowers," and the leaders are Mrs. 
Lillian Acree and Mrs. Claude Burns. 

Those enjoying the hospitality of 
Mrs. McMillian were: Mrs. James 
Burden, Diana Burden, Mrs. Paul 
Beighle, Mrs. William Gibson, Mrs. 
Lillian Acree, Miss Rachel Acree, 
Mrs. Frank Penick, Mrs. Claude 
Burns, Mrs. Donald Rice, Mrs. John 
Hetterman, and Mrs. Homer Winbum. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We wish to thank the ones who 
assisted us on the evening that the 
accident occured in getting my wife 
and our mother to the hospital, and 
we wish to thank everyone for their 
kindness and sympathy during the 
illness and death of my beloved wife 
and our mother,- Mrs. Theresa M. 
Hall; the Eckler Funeral Home, Rev. 
Arthur J. Russell, Kathryn Kent for 
songs, and James Spencer fo music; 
all of those who sent flowers, cards, 
and food; the ministers and members 
of the several churches who offered 
special prayers, and all of those who 
helped in any way. May God's 
blessings rest upon all of you all the 
days of your life. 

LEON B. HALL 
lt-2c AND FAMILY 

CARD OF THANKS . . . 

The family of Mfcs. Lillie Chapman 
wish to thank each and everyone who 
has been so in prayer and thoughts 
with our loved one during her long 
illness. Our thanks and appreciation 
for the many cards, flowers, food and 
acts of kindness which will always be 
remembered. A special thanks to Bro. 
Alford, Dr. Huey, and the Wallace 
Grubbs family. God bless each of you. 
ELMER CHAPMAN 
lt-2c AND FAMILY 



HOMELITE XLs 

are the fastest 

selling chain saws 

in the world! 




HOMELITE 
XL-12 

• Weighs only 12 lbs. 12 oz. less bar 
and chain 

• Cuts 12" trees in 10 seconds ! 

• Easy to start — easy to handle 

• Fells trees up to 3 feet in diameter 
Get a free demonstration today! 




Famous Homelite XL 
Is so light you cm 
MUnceitinonehand! 



RYAN HARDWARE AND 
irnrKlT COMPANY 
Walton, Ky. 






"Thursday, January 14, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



MANY DRUNKS HAVE 
LICENSES TO DRIVE 




OR MIST 



Fewer than 4% of all drivers 
on the road are heavy drinkers. 

Yet heavy drinkers are in- 
voked In nearly 50% of all 
traffic deaths. 

The frightening truth is that 
drunks are the deadliest drivers 
ever let loose on the highways. 

Knowing that, you might 
think our licensing officials 
would take extraordinary 
measures to hunt down this 
small gang of killers and get 
them off the road, saving 
25,000 lives a year. 

It's not happening. The way 
things are now, there's no ef- 
fective way to take a drunk's 
license away before he kills 
some food v 

With 25,000 lives at stake, 
safety experts at the Continen- 
tal Insurance Companies point 
out, there must be a better 
answer than that. 

Maybe it's a thorough physi- 
cal examination. A doctor 
must certify that every new 
driving-license applicant is not 
an alcoholic. 

Maybe there's a better way, 
but certainly what Pennsyl- 
vania does is better than 
nothing. 

And nothing is what all but 
a handful of states actually do. 

This is one reason why 
safety groups ask that we write 
to our local legislators and urge 
that they get drunken potential 
killers off the road. 




To Speak In N. Kentucky 

Douglas D. Moseley, of Columbia, 
Ky., who has for some months been 
actively considered a candidate for 
Superintendent of Public Instructon 
on the Republican ticket, will be in 
Northern Kentucky, January 14, to 
address the Optimist Club and the 
Boone County Republican Club. 

He will speak to the Optimists at 
12:00 noon at the Covington YMCA, 
and that evening will be a guest at 
the regular meeting of the Boone Re- 
publican Club at their headquarters, 
276 Main St., Florence. 

Kenton Elementary PTA 

The Kenton Elementary PTA will 
hold its regular meetin January 21 at 
8:00 p m., in the school gym. 

The program will be presented by 
Mrs. Pearl S. Bullock, Remedial Read- 
ing Supervisor of Kenton County. 

If a good face is a letter of recom- 
mendation, a good heart is a letter of 
credit. — Edw. Bulwer-Lytton 



CARLISLE'S ?«ef5KIDS 



SINCE THE YEAR IS 
SETTING OLDER, 
EVERY DAY THE 
WEATHERS COLDER. 



You'll laugh at stormy weather 
and cold winds with oar ever- 
ready fuel oil in your tank. We 
make sure you have it when 
you need it. 



ALWAYS" HAVE OUR 
, FUEL OIL ON HAND 

C LOCAL TKADf MARKS. lac • 




NEEDS CONTRIBUTIONS 

The Ohio Valley Goodwill Indus- 
tries Rehabilitation Center needs con- 
tributions of materials to carry on 
therapy, job-training and employment 
for handicapped men and women. 

Used clothing, shoes, small appli- 
ances, books — fiction or non-fiction for 
children and adults — utensils, furniture 
and other items that can be refurbish- 
ed, will be very greatly appreciated. 

For pickup in Northern Kentucky, 
please call 581-8237. 

Taylor Mill PTA Meets 

The January meeting of the Taylor 
Mill PTA will be held on Monday, 
Jan. 18, at 7:30 p. in., in the school 
auditorium. 

. A musical program. "What's In the 
Weather?" will be presented by the 
second and third grade students, under 
the direction of Mrs. Janice Riches 
and Mrs. Barbara Curry. 

At 7:00 p. m., there will be a 
study group and discussion in the 
cafeteria for all parents and teachers 
of the third and fourth grade stu- 
dents. 




& HE HEARTY ENGLISH 
* WASSAIL— LOWG THE 
TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS TOAST 
-WAS PIPPeO INTO WOODEN MUGS 
FROM A BOWL COWTAINIM& HOT 
ALE "LACED" With RoastEP 
APPLE*, SU&AR^NP ASSORTED SPICES 

* v~- 

'CAfT/ 




*■ > 



iV R.OBM HOOD'S PAY, 
^gOASr PEACOCK WAS THE STAR 
ATTRACTION AT MAMV A 
GENTLEMAN'S CHRISTMAS TABLE. 




=*■-$& 



KehtucKy 



YEAR ROUND 



STATE RESORT 
PARKS 



^beikfH you* OW* 



All Expense 

FALL- WINTER- SPRING 

VACATION. 



... in Kentucky's luxurious State 
Resort Parks . . . two package rates- 
SSI plus tax for one person, or $55 
plus tax for two. The one low price 
covers yourlodge for two nights, and 
all meajs from evening dinner on the 
day of your arrival through lunch the 
third day. 

Start any day! The Vacation Package 
Plan is in effect from September 2, 
1970 through March 31, 1971, except 
for the Christmas holidays. 

TRY TWO! . . pne after the other in 
the same or different parks . . . 



•jt 



it s 1 1 mr best way to 



-discover 



%* #• 



KENTUCKY DAM VILLAGE STATE RESORT 
LAKE BARKLEY STATE RESORT PARK 
OINERAL BUTLER STATE RESORT PARK 
LAKE CUMBERLAND STATE RESORT PARK 
CUMBERLAND PALLS STATE RESORT PARK| 
NATURAL BRIDOH STATE RESORT PARR 
CARTER CAVES STATE RESORT PARK 
JBNNY WILEY STATE RESORT PARK 



■ ^ Ite-discovt 

!\£iiiucK> 



Ttlephona the park of your choice, or 
CENTRAL RESERVATIONS 
Frankfort (502) 223-2326 

For Individual park brochures, write 
TRAVEL 

Department of Public Information 
.Kentucky 40601 



Published As A Public Service by The Walton Advertiser 





Ya tay ya got a problem 
Ya don't know what to do 
.' ;t put an - cd fn claiiified 
:'s my aJ.lco to you. 



Walton Lodge To Meet 

Walton Lodge, No. 719, F&AM, 
will hold its regular monthly business 
meeting on Thursday, January 21, at 
8:00 p. m. All members are urged to 

be present, and visitors are welcome. 

' r •• 

"Seems to me your girl is kind of 
spoiled." "Tain't that_at all. It's just 
the perfume she's wearing." 

"Alaska bigger than Texas?" said 
the Texan. "Could be, but just wait 
until it melts." • 



Walton OES To Meet 

Walton Chapter, No. 161, OES, 
will have a call meeting Saturday, 
January 16 at 7:30 p. rn. for the 
purpose of initiating a candidate.. All 
members, especially officers, are urged 
to be present, and visitors are wel- 
come. Refreshments will be served 
after the meeting. 

The regular business meeting of 
the chapter will be held on Monday, 
January 17 at 7:30 p. m. All mem- 
bers are urged to be present, and visit- 



ors are welcome. Refreshments will be 
served after the meeting. 

"■ 

A man answering an ad for a 
chauffeur's job was being examined 
by the car owner. He was asked if he 
had traveled much in other states. 
"Yes, sir," replied the prospective 
chauffeur. "All right," said the car 
owner; handing him a road map, "let's 
see you fold it." 

IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID? 




f?H£ HUkIM 0KAW 

IS THE MOST 
COMPACT COMPUTER 
KNOWN. IN MANY 
WAYS IT RESEMBLES 
A SWITCHSOARP 
OF INTERCONNECTED 

CIRCUITS. A 
LARGE COMPUTER 
. MIGHT REOUIRB 
70,000 WATTS, 
PUT THE BRAIM 
NEEPS OMLY AS MUCH 

POWER AS A 
10- WATT 6HM.&/ 
-£Z d-v ->iiminil»llmnili 



WH%Ol\ 






firfhfo 



* 



HW aaj&ttft fftwtft jocA puce* 



Dailies 



SMOKED - TENDERIZED 
Medium Size 



LB. 



43c 



Jowl Bacon 



3 Lbs. or More 
By the Piece Only 




are Ribs 



FRESH PORK 
COUNTRY STYLE 

Repeat Sale Due 
To Sell-Out 



ib 29c 

ib 49c 



PEACHES 



WHITE VILLA 

Sliced or Halves 

15 Or. Size 



4 for 89c 



TOMATO JUICE, While Villa I8-01. sin 5 for 89c 

——1 — — 1 ______ — ___________ _____ 

RED BEAKS, Honey Grove 16-oz. size 6 for 89c 

(HILI BEANS, White Villa 15-oz. size, 6 for 89c 

PORK & BEANS, While Villa 15'/i-oz. size 6 for 89c 

BUTTER BEANS, While Villa 15-oz. size 6 for 89c 



Early June Peas 



HONEY GROVE 
16-Oz. Size 



6 for 89c 



CATSUP, Honey Grove 12-oz. size... < for 89c 

CANNED MILK, While Villa 14^-oz. size 5 for 89c 

COFFEE CREAMER, While Villa 11-oz. size 45c 

BLACK PEPPER, White Villa 4-oz. size 2 for 89c 

Produce Department 

Red Pot atoes » ■»■• * 1 .09 

FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OF $3.00 OR MORE 



Model 




Store 



FREE Delivery Every Morning— Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 
Two Deliveries On Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 6:00 p. m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 8.-00 p. m., Friday and Saturday 



Phone 485-4991 



Walton, Kentucky 



(.* 



>£ 



r 



^ 



& 



o*' 








Walton Man Ordained 



A Modernly-Equipped Weekly Newspaper - — Letter Press and Offset Printing Phone: 485-4962 
Serving A Progressive Community — Boone, Kenton, Grant & Gallatin Counties ^ £ 



Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 3 



Walton-Verona Schools Free Lunch System % m ™™L s ™™ch Slate Convention 

Of County Fairs 



The Walton-Verona Independent 
Schools system has a policy to provide 
lunches free or at a reduced price to 
those children determined by the 
principals to be unable to pay the full 
price for their lunches. 

The policy provides that an appli- 
cation form be completed and return- 
ed to the school. Copies of this form 
have been sent home in a letter to 
parents, and additional copies may be 
obtained at the principal's office in 
each school. 

The form itself is simple to com- 
plete and requests information needed 
to determine economic need, based 
on the gross family income, the num- 
ber of persons. in the family, the num- 
ber of children in school or service 
institutions, and any unusual circum- 
stances or hardships which affect the 
family's ability to pay for school 
lunches. The information provided on 
the application will be confidential 
and will be used only for the purpose 
of determining eligibility for free and 
reduced-price lunches, school officials 

Hinsdale Returns Home 

R. C. Hinsdale, superintendent of 
Kenton County schools, returned to 
his home here, last Saturday, accord- 
ing to reports. 

He was injured in an auto accident 
Dec. 23, in Spartanburg, S. C, where 
he and his wife were visiting their 
son, James. He has since been in a 
hospital there. 

"He suffered a bruised spinal cord 
and will enter a local hospital when 
he gets home," said Miss Helen Rich- 
ardson, finance director for the Ken- 
ton County schools. 

Mr. Hinsdale was accompanied by 
Mrs. Hinsdale. They reside on Wal- 
ton-Nicholson Road. 

Church League 
Basketball Results 

In the first game last Saturday 
night, Piner defeated Hickory Grove, 
70-63. Cornelius and Matteoli led 
Pfner with 18 points each, while Jane- 
way and Mastin had 15 each for the 
Hickory Grove team. 

In the second contest, Richwood 
defeated New Bethel, 79-63 Spillman 
and Jerry Feagan led the winners with 
18 points each, and Roaden chipped 
in with 17. Littrell led New Bethel 
with 18, and Chipman had 17. 

In the last game, Walton Christian 
squeeked by the Church of Christ, 
72-70.' Mullins led the Christians with 
20 points, and Holder added 16. For 
the Church of Christ, Lockard had 30. 

This weekend, at 5:30, St. Cecilia 
plays St. Patrick; at 6:45, Hickory 
Grove goes against Walton Methodist, 
and at 8:00, Walton Baptist - plays 
New Bethel. In the nightcap, the 
**■;-■•*• «*, Chzist plays Piner. 

Come out and see the action. 

W-V PTA TO MEET 

The Walton-Verona PTA will meet 
on January 25 at 7:30 p. m., in the 
Walton gym. 

Mrs. Stephenson will have the pro- 
gram on drug abuse. 

Boone Knothole Meeting 

There will be a meeting of the 
Boone County Knothole Boosters at 
7:30 p. m., Monday, January 25 at 
St. Paul School, Florence. 

All parents and business men are 
invited to attend. This meeting will 
concern attempts to increase the size 
of the league, the need for new fields, 
and discuss rules for 1971. Francis 
Becker, Executive Supervisor, will give 
first hand information on some of 
the new programs for the '71 season. 

WORK-FUN DAY 

The eighth grade class at the Wal- 
ton Christian Church met Saturday at 
the church for a work-fun day. 

The noon luncheon was a surprise 
birthday celebration honoring Gwen 
Milner on her 14th birthday. 

Those attending were Mary Beth 
Rouse, Fannie Thorpe, Lee Ann Scott, 
Patsy Marsh, David Peebles, Neil 
Spencer, Mrs. James Spencer, and Mrs. 
Frank Afterkirk. 

Health Dept. to Close 

Offices of the Boone County Health 
Department, Florence, will be closed 
Friday, January 22, in order for per- 
sonnel to attend a regional meeting 
conducted by the State Health Dept. 



said. 

Under the provisions of the policy, 
the principals will make the deter- 
mination of individual eligibility. The 
family size income scale which the 
Walton-Verona Independent Schools 
have adopted for use in the system 
will be used to determine eligibility 
for free and reduced-price lunches. 

If a parent is dissatisfied with the 
ruling of a principal he may make a 
request either orally or in writing for 
a hearing to appeal the decision. The 
request should be made to E. C. 
Roberts, Superintendent. 

The hearing will be conducted in 
accordance with the procedures as out- 
lined in the policy. 

The policy also provdes that there 
will be ho identification or discrimin- 
ation against any student unable to 
pay the full cost of a lunch. 

A complete copy of the policy is on 
file in each school and in the office 
where it may be reviewed by any 
interested patron. 

TWO GOLD LETTER DAYS 




Raymond Giles 

Officials of Peoples-Liberty Bank 
and Trust Co., Covington, including 
Joseph Cuni, board chairman; Merwin 
Grayson,- vice chairman of the board, 
and Ralph V. Haile, Jr, president, paid 
tribute recently to Raymond Giles, 
vice president and director of the 
bank, to mark two golden anniver- 
sary observances. 

In November, 1920, Mr. Giles 
started to work for the Bank of In- 
dependence. He was president of the 
bank when it merged last year with 
Peoples-Liberty. Next month he will 
observe his 50th year as a 32d de- 
gree Mason. 

Congratulations, Mr. Giles! 

CANCER SOCIETY 
PRESENTING FILM 

The Boone County Chapter of the 
American Cancer Society is presenting 
a film and discussion on breast cancer 
to the junior and seniors girls, their 
mothers and all interested mothers in 
the Walton-Verona School District. 

The film will be shown in the 
Walton-Verona gymnasium at 9:00 a. 
m., Wednesday, January 27, 1971. 

Dr. W. M. Waller will entertain 
a question and answer period following 
the film. 

Students are encouraged to notify 
their mdthers of this program and 
extend a cordial invitation from the 
Walton-Verona School system, accord- 
ing to Billy Prewitt, principal of the 
high school. 

Fish Fry, Dance at Union 

The Union Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment and the Ladies' Auxiliary will 
have a fish fry and dance on Satur- 
day, January 23, r at the Union Fire 
House. The fish fry will start at 5:30 
and continue until 8:30 p. m. The 
dance will be from 9:00 p. m. until 
1:00 a. m. Admission for the dance 
will be $1.50 per person. Music will 
be provided by "Country Classic." 

A doctor was fuming when he 
finally reached his table at a banquet 
after breaking away from a women 
who sought advice on a health prob- 
lem. "Do you think I should send 
her a bill?" he asked a lawyer who 
was sitting next to him, "Why not?" 
the lawyer replied, "you rendered 
professional services by giving advice." 
"Thanks," the physician said. "I think 
111 do that." When the doctor went 
to his office the next day to send a 
bill to the annoying women, he found 
a statement from the lawyer. It read: 
"For legal services— $25." 



AT CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

A service, participated in by the 
Walton area churches, will be held 
at the Walton Christian Church on 
Sunday evening, January 24th at 7:30. 

The theme is "Fellowship of the 
Holy Spirit." 

Dr. Frank Steely, president of the 
Northern Kentucky t State College, wiB 
be the speaker. The host church choir 
will bring special music, and Rev. A. 
J. Russell, host pastor, will preside. 
Other Walton ministers will share in 
the leadership of the worship. 

SIMON KENTON TOPS 
BEECH\yOOD, 89 TO 71 

Simon Kenton's Pioneers handed 
the Beech wood Tigers an 89-71 defeat 
last Friday night at Ft. Mitchell. 

The Pioneers grabbed an 8-point 
lead in the opening period and clinch- 
ed the contest with a 23-point third 
period. 

The Pioneers put five players in 
double figures with Steve Leistner 
leading the way with 19 points, Hal- , 
derman added 17, Rust 12, Martin 
17, and Davis 13. Goochfhad 17 for 
Beech wood. 

Simon Kenton 93, Gallatin County 50 

The Simon Kenton Pioneers went 
outside the NKAC to trounce Gal- 
latin County's Wildcats, 93-50, last 
Saturday night at Independence. 

The winners placed 11 players in 
the scoring column and held a 15- 
point advantage after two periods. 
The Pioneers then limited the losers , 
to five points in the third period to 
turn the game into a rout. 

For the winners, Leistner scored 19 
points, Halderman 14, Martin 17, and 
for the losers, Davis had 16, Brock 11 
and Brown 10. 

Altar Society Plans Social 

The Altar Society of St. Cecilia 
Church, Independence, -will sponsor a 
social on Wednesday, January 27, be- 
ginning St 1:30 p. m. The public is 
invited. 

FARM CROPS' VALUE IN 
KENTUCKY DECLINES 

Southern leaf blight, which ruined 
some 35 percent of Kentucky's corn 
crop this year, was the main cause of 
a $23 million drop in the state's total 
farm crop value, according to recent 
projections from the Kentucky Crop 
and Livestock Reporting Service. 

The projected value of tobacco, in- 
cluding dark types grown in Western- 
Kentucky, was off about $9 million, 
or 3 percent under last year, because 
of less production. Average prices, 
however, rose a little more than two 
cents per pound-^-70.2 cents for 1970, 
compared with 68 cents for 1969. 

The value of corn for grain, not 
including silage, . dropped more than 
$24 million. 

Soybeans offset some of the losses 
to com and tobacco by increasing in 
value to over $42 million, $11 million 
over 1969. Processed vegetables more 
than doubled in value to $2.5 million. 



ENGAGED 



PHILLIPS-WARREN 

Mrs. Melvin F. Phillips, Jr. of 
independence, announces the engage 
ment of their daughter, Cathy Max- 
ine, to James Warren, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. George W. Warren, also 
of Independence. 

The wedding will be an event of 
March 6, 1971. 

HIGH BURLEY AVERAGES 

Farmers in this area recently sold 
their tobacco on the Erlanger To- 
bacco Market, with the following 
averages: 

George Rehkamp, Jr., Florence, 
1846 lbs., $75.75; Clara Cooke, Morn- 
ing View, 4274 lbs., $75.46; Robert 
Mathis, Walton, 1592 lbs., $74.14; 
Edward Scott, Morning View, 1236 
lbs., $74.74; C. R. and Charles Gall, 
morning View, 1070 lbs., $74.20; 
Kenneth Dixon, Walton, 1890 lbs., 
$73.82; Basil Lunsford, Sr., Walton, 
4920 lbs., $74.79; Nick Blau, Wal- 
ton, 1576 lbs., $74.74, and Ferdie 
Dance Estate, 1384 lbs., $74.11. 

Softball League for Girls 

A few churches in this area have 
expressed an interest in a girls' soft- 
ball league. If your church is interest- 
ed, please contact Mrs. Paul E. Holt 
at 371-5508. If enough churches re- 
spond, a meeting will be held in the 
near future. 



Cecil Cummins, Route 1, Critten- 
den, President of the Kenton County 
Fair Association, Tpc, and Robert G. 
Maddox, Treasurer, 5870 Wilson Rd., 
Independence, attended the State Con- 
vention of County Fairs and Horse 
Shows, Friday through Saturday night 
of last week. 

The convention was held in the 
Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on Jan. 14, 
15 and 16. 

Miss Janice Coppage, Miss Kenton 
County Fair Queen of 1970, repre- 
sented Kenton County in the State 
County Fair Queen Pageant. Janice 
is the beautiful daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. William R. Coppage, 7141 Tay- 
lor Mill Road, Independence. She is 
18 years old and a freshman at More- 
head State University. The Beauty 
Pageant was held Saturday night in 
the ball room of the Phoenix. All of 
Kenton County can be proud to have 
been represented by Miss Coppage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Coppage, Mr. Mad- 
dox and Mr. Cummins attended the 
Beauty Pageant from Kenton County. 

Dates for the 1971 Kenton County 
Fair are August 10-14 

Methodist Men to Meet 

The United Methodist Men of the 
Covington District will meet Tuesday, 
January 26th at Asbury Church, High- 
land Heights. 

Dinner will be served at 6:30 p. m. 
For reservations, call 621-4993 or 
441-5502 by Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Frank and 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Martin will 
present the program, "Family Life." 

Wesleyan Service Guild 

The Weskjan Service GuUd of the 
Walton United Methodist Church 
met in the home of Mrs. Paul Beighle 
on Monday evening, Jan. 11th. 

The meeting was opened by the 
president, Mrs. Sam Motley, with all 
repeating the Lord's prayer. 

After the business session, Mrs. 
Gene Penn gave a very interesting 
program on Palms. 

A dessert course was served by the 
hostess to the following: Mesdames 
Gay Best, John Gray, Gene Roland, 
Gene Penn, Dave Newcomer, Richard 
Bachmeyer, Robert Yates, Jack Nor- 
ris, William Mastin, Sam Mosley, 
James Lawrence Jerry Treadway, and 
George Anderson, and Miss Louise 
Stuard. 

. — ] 

Fishing Club to Meet 

The Walton Fishing Club will hold 
its annual meeting on Sunday, Jan. 24 
at 2:00 p. m., in the Lloyd Club 
House at Crittenden. 

All members and others who are 
interested in the club are requested to 
be present. 



MISS BOONE FAIR 
3d IN STATE EVENT 

Deborah Ann (Debbie) Chapman 
was second runner-up for the title, 
"Miss Kentucky County Fair of 1971" 
in competition at Lexington, last Sat- 
urday night. 

Miss Chapman, who is "Miss Boone 
County Fair of 1970," won the run- 
ner-up spot in competition with 50 
county fair winners from throughout 
Kentucky. 

The raven-haired 17-year-old beauty 
is a Simon Kenton High School sen- 
ior, who lives at 6059 Club House 
Drive, Taylor Mill. 

Also present at Saturday's festivities 
was Miss Carol Schwenke, 17-year-old 
Union girl, who was last year's "Miss 
Kentucky County Fair of 1970." 

SIMON KENTON FHA 
ALUMNAE OFFICERS 

Newly elected officers of the Simon 
Kenton FHA Alumnae will hold their 
first meeting on Thursday, January 21 
at 7:30 p. m., in the KECC Build- 
ing on Walton-Nicholson Road. 

The new officers are: President, 
Judy Courtney Schadler; Vice Presi- 
dent, Rita Trapp Potts; Secretary, 
Sandy Matteoli Richardon; Treasurer, 
Judy Lamkin New; Reporter, Pam 
Schadler Barnes. 

All past members of the Simon 
Kenton High School FHA are wel- 
come to attend. 

Annual Straight- A Program 

The fifth annual Straight-A pro- 
vfram, honoring students in grades 
seven through 12 for academic excel- 
lence, will reach record proportions in 
1971, according to the co-sponsors, 
the Cincinnati Reds and the Cincin- 
nati Enquirer. 

Qualified students will receive two 
reserved seat tickets to each e| three 
Reds' 1971 dates. The scholars will 
select three dates from a list of 12 
Riverfront Stadium games. 

The next to last grading period of 
the 1970-1971 school year wilj be us- 
ed to determine winners in the tri- 
state area. Counties involved in the 
1971 Straight-A program from Ken- 
tucky are Boone, Kenton, Campbell, 
Gallatin, Grant, Pendleton and Brack- 
en. 

JUNIOR CLASS HAM 
DINNER, FEBRUARY 5 

The junior class of Walton-Verona 
High School will have a ham dinner 
Friday, February 5, starting at 5:30 
p. m. The menu will consist of ham, 
sweet potatoes, green beans, salad, and 
dessert. Tickets are on sale from any 
member of the class. Adults, $1.15, 
and children, 65 cents. At the door, 
the cost will be $1.25 for adults, and 
75 cents for children. 

The juniors invite you to be pres- 
ent and enjoy a good dinner. 




Paul Wilson 

On January 10, at the Blue Springs 
First Baptist Church, Blue Springs, 
Mo., Paul Wilson was ordained to 
the gospel ministry of religious educa- 
tion and youth. 

Mr. Wilson is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence Wilson, Walton, and 
is a graduate of Walton-Verona High. 
School and Georgetown College. He 
is now in his third year at the Mid- 
western Baptist Seminary at Kansas 
City, Mo. 

He is married to the former Melody 
Moore of Dallas, Texa, and they have 
a son, Paul, Jr. . 

He is the full time minister of re- 
ligious education and youth at the 
Blue Springs First Baptist Church. 

Fathers' Night at PTA 

The fathers will preside and con- 
duct the regular monthly meeting of 
the White's Tower Elementary PTA 
on Thursday, January 21, in the school 
cafeteria at 7:30 p. m. 

Following the meeting there will 
be a program presented by the PTA 
board members and teachers with Ivan 
Cooper, Physical Education instruc- 
tor, explaining and demonstrating the 
gym equipment purchaed through ef- 
forts of the* PTA, 

There will be a baby sitting service 
available for those wishing to attend. 

Nurses To Graduate 
Thursday, Jan. 21lh 

Five young ladies from the area 
served by the Walton Advertiser will 
don the white dresses of nurses fol- 
lowing graduation exercises Thursday, 
January 21, at the First Presbyterian 
Church, Covington 

The quintet has completed a year 
of work and study at the Booth Hos- 
pital School of Practical Nursing. The 
evening before graduation the class- 
held its annual banquet. 

Booth has graduated more than 2S0- 
practical nurses since the school was- 
re-established in 1959. Most of the 
current have already obtained po- 
sitions in Greater Cincinnati hospitals 
and nursing homes. 

From Advertiser-land are: Mrs, 
Sherry Taylor, a Simon Kenton grad- 
uate, Taylor Mill Road; Mrs. Doris 
Sullivan, a graduate of Erlanger Lloyd, 
Florence; Miss Wanda Gail Shoe- 
maker, a graduate of Boone County, 
Mt. Zion Road; Mrs. Shirley Ann 
Overstreet, a graduate of Covington 
Holmes, Walton, and Miss Brenda 
Faye Dunn, a graduate of Boone Co- 
unty High, Erlanger. 




HI U'1,1. ,' 



kiokwood PieiAufoucui Glwick 
Rictuuood, Kentucky 
fyHutded <h f/34 

The dedication of a Historical Market, awarded to the church by the Highway Marker Comrnttee of the Kentucky 
Hitorical Society, was held at the church last Sunday afternoon. The program was presided over by the pastor, Rev 
Roy Sharpe. The dedicatory address was given by the Rev. Julian Charles, a former pastor, and the unveiling of the 
marker was by Master James Brady Walton. The above sketch of the church was drawn by Caroline Williams Rich- 
wood is the oldest Presbyterian church in the Northern Kentucky area. 



Thursday, January 21, 1971 



• ■ 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



WALTON ADVERTISER ~> 

(Established In 1914) 

Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 ttorth Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 - Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Notes Of Servicemen 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 

Assistant Editor 

Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch, Foreign Rate, 6c Per Line. 




Lora Durey and Onie Cook of 
Bright, Ind., called on their cousin, 
Ruth B. Smith, Sunday. - 

Ronnie Kilgorc of Bedinger Ave., 
is confined in St. Elizabeth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie Smith visit- 
ed his sister at Falmouth, Thursday. 

Mr. and Mr. Lawrence Wilson had 
as guests Friday, Mrs. William Rorer, 
Mn. Pat King and son, William 
Todd, of Cynthiana. 

Mrs. Mable Johnson and Betty had 
as Saturday guests, Shannon and Kevin 
Kelly of Independence. , 

Dwayne Cooke is confined tp his 
home with chicken pox. 

Sympathy is extended to Mr. and 
Mrs. Tom Poland in the death of Mr. 
Poland's nephew in Warsaw. 

Mr. and Mrs. "Dyke" Vest and 
sons, Mickey and Tommy, of Louis- 
ville, were weekend guests of her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kendall. 

Mrs. Lee Naive and Miss Ree Step- 
pier of Banklick Road, had as dinner 
guests Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin 
Utley and family, Mrs. Edith Hamil- 
ton and Mrs. Mary Stephenson. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Johnson of 
Covington, were Friday night guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Horn and 
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Denney and 
daughter, Anna Maria. 

Mr. and Mr. Clarence Sturgeon, 
Mr. and Mr. Carl Alexander and 
daughters, Karen and Paula, and Mr. 
Don Sturgeon and son, Paul, were 
the Monday night dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mr. Chester Sturgeon, the 
occasion being the birthday of Mr. 
Clarence Sturgeon. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

I wish to take this opportunity to 
express my deep appreciation to rela- 
tives and friends for their prayeR, cards 
and visits to see me while I was n 
the hospital. Your kindness and your 
thoughtfulness will long be remem- 
bered. Also, my thanks to Rev. Stan- 
ley Fleming and Rev. Hils. 

DELLA R. MADDIN 

Box 432 
lt-3c Walton, Ky. 41094 



The Happy Helpers class met on 
Tuesday, Jan. 12 at the church with 
Mr. Malcolm Simpson and Mrs.'' 
Jesse Callen as hostesses. A very in- 
teresting devotional was given by S. 
A. Morgan. Mr. Callen gave the 
annual report, and started the new 
year with a different committee. Ray 
Allen showed color slides of his 
brother, Don Allen, while serving in 
Vietnam. Everyone was anxious to 
see pictures of Vietnam and see how 
they lived. Those enjoying the de- 
licious refreshments were Rev. Robert 
Yates, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Callen, 
Mr. and Mr. Charles Carlisle, Mr. 
and Mr. Lawrence Lemons, Mr. and 
Mr. Steve Morgan, Mr. and Mr. J. 
J. Bamett, Mr. Lil Young, Mr. 
Charles Ammer, Mr. Edith Hamilton, 
Mr. William Brown, Mr. Mary Step- 
henson, and Mr. Malcolm Simpson. 

Bill Robinson is able to be out 
after being confined in the hospital. 

Mr. Stanley Bush is recuperating 
at the home of her sister, Mr. John 
McClure, and Mr. McClure at Inde- 
pendence, after having surgery at 
Booth Hospital, Jan; 6. 

Mr. and Mr. R. C. Brakefield were 
the Saturday evening dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mr. W. W. Rouse. 




BIRTHS 



A baby girl has arrived in the home 
of Mr. and Mr. Lee Pennington, 22 
Carrie Way Drive, Independence. 
Brother, David Scott, and sister, Suz- 
anne Michele, are giving Leigh Anne, 
born January 7, a very enthusiastic 
welcome. 

Bom to David and Flora Kuchle of 
Route 2, Walton, a daughter, at 7:46 
a. m., January 13, at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. 

Born to Junior and*. Bonnie Neace 
of Route 2, Walton, a daughter, at 
2:47 p. m., January 13, at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital. 



Airman Thomas E. Epperson, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Epperson, Jr. 
of 721 Lakeview Drive, Independence, 
has received his fiRt U. S. Air Force 
duty assignment after completing basic 
training at Lackland AFB, Texas. The 
airman has been assigned to a unit 
of the Tactical Air Command at the 
Langley AFB, Va., for training and 
duty as a security policeman. Airman 
Epperson is a 1968 graduates of Cov- 
ington Holmes High School, and at- 
tended Murray State UniveRity. 

Navy Seaman Apprentice Earl W. 
Farris, son of Mr. and Mr. Earl W. 
Farris, 3455 Richardson Road, Inde- 
pendence, was graduated from recruit 
training at the Recruit Training Cen- 
ter, Naval Training Center, Great 
Lakes, 111. 

Sgt. John A. BickeR, son of Mr. 
Nora Caswell, 14 Locust St., Walton, 
is on duty at Tan Son Nhut AB in 
Vietnam. He is a security policeman 
and assigned to a unit of the Pacific 
Air Forces. He previously served at 
Vandenberg AFB, Calif. The sergeant 
is a 1966 graduate of Walton- Verona 
High School. 

His wife, Eva, is the daughter of 



S 



■ 

! 



BUILDING LOTS-^r lots, 75'x\5(y t Lebanon Road, 5 
city water. Priced right. 

40- AC RE tract; older house and barn. 

■ 
W/i ACRE tract; no improvements. 

5-ACRE tract, no improvements. 

121/2 ACRES, lays well, LLL Highway. " 

30 ACRES— Price $12,750.00. LLL Highway. 





Gayle ■ 
McElroy 5 
Realty ' ■ 

33 Alto Vista Drive 

Walton, Kentucky , 
Phone: 485-4297 



inside the hrightturbulent 
world of todays youth... 



"The Restless Ones," considered the 
most successful motion picture yet 
produced by Evangelist Billy Graham, 
will be shown in Walton on January 
27, in the First Baptist Church on 
South Main Street, 6:30 to 8:30 p. 
m. You are invited. 





COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERYICEI 

Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for You — - o 

Nie's Pharmacy 

LLl Hig hway between Independence and Nicholson 



Mrs. Petra Azacarraga, 3935 Caseman 
Ave., Imperial Beach, Calif. 

The sergeant's father, Kline Bick- 
ers, resides at 61* Greenup St., Cov- 
ington. 

BEAVER LICK 

Mrs. Edna Dickerton's father, Homer 
Osborn, passed away last week. We 
all extend our deepest sympathy to 
her and her family. 

Mrs. Randell Rhodes has been help- 
ing take care of her uncle, Robert 
(Bob) Woods, who has been real sick 
for the past weelP. 

Louise Cope of Walton, spent the 
weekend with her sister, Mabel Ros- 
enstiel, of Beaver. • • 

Henry Black re-entered the hos- 
pital (St. Elizabeth) for surgery again. 
He keeps having severe headaches. He 
had surgery a couple of weeks ago. 

Delmer Reed and Lon Wilson are 
both still on the sick list. 

Most everyone in the Beaver area 
is finished with their tobacco, and 
now they will sit by the fire and plan 
for their new '71 crop. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Rosenstiel and 
Gene, Shirley and Clint Stephenson 
were Sunday guests of Charles Rosen- 
stiel and family of Ft. Mitchell. 

William Webb of Cleek Lane got 
his wife a nice gift so she will have 
lots of work to do— a new deepfreeze. 

Middle Age: That time of life when 
your narrow waist and your broad 
mind change places. 




WHAT IS A SMILE? 

What is a "smile," and what are 
some of its values? 

It is a contagious thing that makes 
life better when you "catch it" and 
even happier when you "spread it 



around." A real smile is an outer 
reflection of an inner condition. None 
are so rich they can get along with- 
out it and none so poor but are 
richer for its benefits. 

It is rest to the weary, daylight to 
the discouraged, sunshine to the sad,, 
and nature's best antidote for trouble. 
It cannot be bought, begged, borrow- 
ed or stolen for it is something that 
is of no earthly value to anyone until 
it is given away. — Copied 

A hunter who climbed a fence with 
a loaded gun is survived by his widow, 
three daughters, two sons— and one 
rabbit. 



TRULY HOMELIKE 

A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 

—SERVING ALL FAITHS- 



Independence, Ky. 
356-2673 



DIXIE STATE BANK 

Walton, Kentucky 

CONDENSED STATEMENT 
December 31, 1970 



ASSETS: 

Loans and Discounts.. 



U. S. Government Bonds 
Other Bonds 



Federal Funds Sold. 
Banking House 



Dec. 31, 1960 
.$1,089,679.56 
. 849,246.88 
. 102,025.58 



Furniture and Fixtures- 



Cash and Due from Banks . 
Other Assets 



4,500.00 

15,378.79 

614,776.89 

5,950.58 



LIABILITIES: 
Capital Stock- 
Surplus - _. 



Undivided Profits- 



Reserve for Loan Losses. 

•JJneamed Income 

Deposits - Demand 

Deposits - Time. 

Reserve for Dividends 

Other Liabilities , 



$2,681,558.28 



100,000.00 
100,000.00 
140,780.51 



1,703,031.61 

683,829.83 

3,000.00 

916.33 



$2,681,558.28 



Dec. 31, 1965 

$1,831,332.23 

1,133,999.56 

121,407.20 

2,000.00 

17,907.46 

681,222.64 

5,947.76 

$3,793,816.85 



$ 100,000.00 
200,000.00 
114,958.24 



1,839,334.81 

1,534,498.80 

5,000.00 

25.00 

$3,793,816.85 



Dec. 31, 1970 

$3,061,341.24 

1,378,315.33 

549,890.87 

• 90,000.00 

1,900.76 

21,758.16 

776,072.17 

3,572.71 

$5,882,851.24 



$ 100,000.00 

200,000.00 

215,198.91 

22,796.24 

59,354.84 

2,416,899.51 

2,866,023.07 

765.00 

1,813.67 

$5,882,851.24 




SATURDAY, JANUARY BO, 1971 - 10:00 A. M. 

At the farm of Ken Dixon, on Lemon-Northcutt Road, 6 Miles North of Dry Ridge, 
Kentucky, in Grant County. 

Mr. Dixon has decided to quite the dairy business and will sell his entire dairy 
herd, on the above date. Also, 206-acre farm. 

46 head of dairy cattle and heifers, which include 31 head of Holstein, Brown Swiss, 
Ayrshire and Guernsey, mainly all Holstein, and 15 head of fine Holstein heifers. 

ONE OF THE BEST DAIRY HERDS IN GRANT COUNTY! The cows range in age 
from 3 to 8 years; 8 open cows, 20 have freshened in the last 3 months, and are 
bred back; rest to freshen soon. One cow gives 60 lbs. per day, 1 gives 56 lbs., 3 
give 52 lbs., 4 give 48 lbs., 4 give 40 lbs., 3 give 36 lbs., 2 give 32 lbs., 2 give 30 lbs., 
1 gives 28 lbs. All TB and Bangs tested. 

Also to be offered at auction — 206-acre farm, .9 mile road frontage on the Lemon- 
Northcutt Road, fenced and cross-fenced into 7 different fields; large tobacco barn, 
also feed and dairy barn with 150-ton silage holder with feeder; a 5- room frame 
home. This farm has 4.8 acres corn base, 1.98 tobacco base, well watered. Here is 
a grazing farm. Also included with the farm is the milking equipment: Bulk tank 
and milkers; also 60 tons good silage. Buy this farm and start shipping milk.* 

TERMS: On farm, 10% down day of sale, balance on or before 30 days or with the 
deed; on personal property, cash or check* 

S&£ CONDUCTED BY 

COL. CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 



Realtors o> Auctioneers 
AUCTIONEERS 



431 -4222 Coving ton-Wi lliamstown 

COL CECIL WAYMAN & REL C. WAYMAN 



Gayle McElroy, Realtor, Walton, Ky. - 485*4297 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 21, 1971 



ELECTRIC SEWER 
CLEANING 

Ditches dug with new treadling 
machine, 4 to 10 inches wide and 
op to 30 inches deep, only 35c 
per foot. Pre-Cast concrete cisterns 
installed, and cisterns and septic 
tanks cleaned. 
F. J. LUCAS SANITATION CO. 



356-2315 



VERONA 

FlonnJe Fdrington, Reporter 

Mrs. May Wilson of Florence, visit- 
ed Mrs. Allie Chandler last week. 

Mrs. Ronnie Edrington received ' 
word last week that her bother-in-law, 
Lloyd Gibbs, of Rising Sun, Ind., had 
passed away last Wednesday at Dear- 
born County Hospital. Mrs. Edring- 
ton did not gei to attend the funeral 
as her daughter, Mrs. Iris Hughes, was 
ill with the flu. 

Sorry Miss Linora Spicer fell last 
week at' school and broke her collar 
bone and will have to lay flat of her 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 



Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax report service 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where T971 changes were taught. 
He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE! 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 - 1 Mile South of Walton 
Phone 356-2172 



MAKE Mg 
"EXTRA" m$ 

money mm 

WITHOUT JH 

FCTPA BSl 


^M^m w^-- ■ 


WORK ^^= 



L& 



Make your money work as hofd OS you do. Our rate 
of return will add up regularly to help build your in- 
sured sovings quickly and effortlessly. Open your 
account with us today! 

ACCOUNTS INSURED TO $20,00000 

ROSEDALE SAVINGS 

Caroline and Southern Avenues Covington, Ky. 
—Phone 431-7723— 



DAIRY HERD AT ABSOLUTE 




SATURDAY, JANUARY 23 - 1:00 P. M. 

At the farm of Oram Brown, Baton Rouge Road, 
Williamstown, Kentucky. 

Mr. Brown's son, Larry, is quitting farming, and Mr. 
Brown cannot care for this large herd. This herd has 
averaged over 25,000 lbs. milk monthly— 

1 2-year-old Holstein bull, extra nice; 22 Holsteins 
milking, all young cows, 12 in full flow; Guernsey cow, 
milking; 4 Holstein springers; 7 Holstein heifers, heavy 
springers. All cattle tested — heajrh papers with each 



cow. 



, Oram & Larry Brown, Owners 

Sale Conducted By 

Lillard-Sfeger Realtors 

823-1011 Crittenden, Kentucky 356-5116 

DAltWIN BAILEY^AUCTIONEER 
WILLIAM C. LILLARD, AUCTIONEER 



back for three weeks to keep from 
being paralyzed in her arm. 

Lon Wilson was brought home 
from the hospital last Monday. Ht is 
some better but still remains very 81. 

We were glad to hear of Charlie 
Richards getting to come home from 
the hospital last week. We wish him 
a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. May Wilson was calling on 
Flonnie Edrington, Wednesday. 

We extend sympathy to the family 
of Gobel Brashear in the loss of their 
loved one. Hamilton Funeral Home 
was in charge. 

We are sorry to leam Vincent 
Rosenstiel had to be taken back to 
the hospital. 

Harry Rich and Mrs. Ebbie Spicer 
were going to St. Elizabeth Hospital 
one day last week to see Mrs. Spicer's 
daughter, Linora, and they had a car 
wreck. Some man came out a side 
road and ran into their car, and thew 
Mrs. Spicer through the windshield. 
She broke her nose and cut her face 
pretty badly. She is in the hospital. 
We hope she will soon be able to 
come home. Mr. Rich was not hurt 
much, just a few bruised places and 
shook up. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Glacken of 
Crittenden, were calling on Mr. and 
Mrs. Calvin Sturgeon, Sunday, a « 

IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID'- 



UNION 



Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Turner and 
family visited his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ira B. Turner, of Cincinnati, on 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shelby Acra of Wal- 
ton, were recent guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. O. L. Black and Mrs. Emma 
Jane Ryle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Beil and fam- 
ily attended the wedding of Rita 
Jarrell and Herbert Kane, 7:30, Fri- 
day evening at the Burlington Baptist 
Church. Our best wishes to the hap- 
py couple. 

A Friday evening dinner guest of 
Frances Gruelle and son, Rodney, was 
Mrs. Mildred Gruelle. 

Recent guests of the O. L. Blacks 



and Mrs. Bruce Ryle were Roscoe 
Moyer, Mrs. Eunice Brunker of Fal- 
mouth and Kenny and Edna Aaylor 
of Florence. 

Mrs. Edith Black and daughter, 
Mrs. Troy Worley, of Norwood, and 
Mr. and Mrs. K. R. Aylor of Flor- 
ence, were Sunday dinner guests of 
Mrs. Bruce Ryle and the O. L. 
Blacks. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Polly of Covingi 
ton, were Saturday guests of the Gil- 
bert Turner family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Denny Kirby visited 
with his mother, Mrs. Lucille Kirby, 
of Burlington, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Slover of 
Cincinnati, were Sunday dinner guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Slover. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry W. Aylor and 



family and Mrs. Mary K. Aylor had 
as dinner guests Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gerald Floyd and Shawn and Steve, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Kenny Aylor called 
in the afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hiller and 
daughter, Mrs. Bruce Ryle, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Larry Noble and daughter, 
Sue, called on their pastor Sunday 
evening. 

Miss Robbie Smith, daughter Of 
Mrs. Robert Smith, and John W. 
Slayback, Jr., were united in marriage 
Saturday everting, Jan. 9 at Big Bone 
Baptist Church. Rev. Robert Ginn 
officiated. We wish them much hap- 
piness. 

No wonder he feels dog-tired at 

night; he growled all day. 



Candid Weddings 

Color & Block & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, Walton 
485-4046 



DO YOU KNOW ... 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As Low As $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market 



turn on June... turn off janu worries. 

You will love that June in January comfort an electric home heating system provides. The addition of cooling to 
the system tempers the sweltering evenings of late June with its refreshingly brisk January air. Including a 
humidifier ends nasal irritation and replenishes moisture so necessary for wood floors and antiques. And an 
electronic air cleaner makes your home a retreat from nature's pollen and dirt. So, trade the many time 
wasting cleaning chores for more time with your family. Our free illustrated brochure helps you plan the best 
electric comfort system. Then, you can turn on June, too* 



CG&E 



THE CINCINNATI GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY 



THE CINCINNATI GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY 
39 N. Broad St., Room 815-g, Middletown, Ohio 45042 

Please send free brochure. 

Name 

Address . . 



City 



State 



Zip 




' *r«&^ 



Thursday, January 21 , 1971 



Walton Advertiser; Walton, \ 



■iM 



JANUARY FURNITURE CLEARANCE 



Beautiful Red & Green 2 -Piece Living 
Room Suite (reg. 349.95) $266.00 

4-Piece Modern Living Room Suite 
with His & Her Chairs, now $266.00 

2-Piece Living Room Suite with Extra 
Length Couch (reg. 379.95) $288.00 

2-Piece Early American Living Room 
Suite with Wood Trim on Arms, 
regular 369.95 Special, only $244.00 

2-Piece Nylon Modern Living Room 
Suite (reg. 249.95) now $169.95 

Ideal for the Family Room! 2-Piece 
Living Room Suite Covered In Long 
Wearing Bollaflex (regular 319.95) 
now only $266.00 



Maple Finish Table & 6 Maple Chairs $199.00 

Sofa Bed Living Room Suite Covered In 
Long Wearing Bollaflex (2-Piece) only $119.95 

2-Piece Modern Living Room Suite $119.95 

3-Piece Modern Living Room Suite, 
Couch, 2 Chairs (reg. 349.95) now $266.00 

Early American 2-Piece Living Room Suite 
Covered In Nylon (reg. 349.95) now $288.00 



YOU ALWAYS SAVE 




Benton- Bona r 

65 N. Main St., Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4495 



Closeout On Metal Kitchen Cabinets 
Base Cabinets from $17.88 

Dish Cabinets.. from $24.88 

Utility Cabinets^ from $9.88 

Metal Wall Cabinets, 42".... .. $16.88 

Reg. 39.95 Roll-Away Bed, complete 
with Mattress (reg. 39.95) now $34.88 

1 0nly-Maple Bunk Bed Set, reg. 
69.95 now only $48.00 

25 Pet. Off On Odds & Ends of Serfa 
Springs & Mattresses In Stock 

9x12 501 Nylon Rugs with Heavy Duty 
Foam Pag (reg. 79-95) special $66.00 

Check Our Money-Saving Prices 
On Whirlpool Appliances 



IT'S A .FINANCIAL FACT 




TH£ RISK OF BORROWING 



4n EARLY AMRlCAM 
FAKM6K WAS LIK6UV TO 
BORROW ON CROPS H6 
WOULP HOPEFULLY HARVEST 
IN THE FALL. IF HIS PLAN- 
NING WENT NO FURTHER 
THAN THAT, A POOR H AR- ./ 
VEST WOULP LEAVE HIM / 
IN FINANCIAL TROUBLE. / 



f HE GOLP-HUNGRV MINERS 
WHO WERE CALLEP FORTY- 
NINERS WERE USUALLY 
STAKEP BY SOMEONE BACK 
EAST. IF THE VENTURES 
FAILEP ANP GILPEP PREAMS 
FELL APART. THE ONLY 
COLLATERAL WAS A PICK 
ANP SHOVEL. 





THE FIRST 
TWO YEARS 



fOPAY.THOSe WHO RUN 
THEIR LIVES ON CKEPIT 
TAKE SIMILAR RISKS IF 
SHORTCOMINGS SHOULD 
OCCUR.* a 



COMPLETE GRINDING & MIXING SERVICE 

We have just installed a new truck hoist system for 
our grinding operation. This eliminates the shoveling 
of corn. Give us a try. 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 



WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 356-2172 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 

U. S. Congressman 

4th District, Kentucky 



It has taken the departure of a 
Democrat — Daniel Parrck Moynihan — 
from the White House staff to put 
the accomplishments of the Adminis- 
tration into perspective. 

I have felt for some time that the 
press has not only misinformed the 
general public, but those within gov- 
ernment, of the true accomplishments 
and progress being made by our Pres- 
ident. 

Using the occasion of the year-end 
meeting of the Cabinet and sub-Cab- 
inet, Moynihan first discussed the 
problems that had faced the Nixon 
Administration when it took office 
two years ago. He described what 
had been done in terms of the di- 
minishing war in Southeast Asia, gov- 
ernment reform and other substantial 
accom plishments . 

Moynihan toW the meeting, "de- 
pressing, even frightening things are 




Walton Lodge To Meet 

Walton Lodge, No. 719, F&AM, 

will hold its regular monthly business 

meeting on Thursday, January 21, at 

8:00 p. m. All members are urged to 

-be present, and visitors are welcome. 

He that blows the coals in a quarrel 
has no right to complain if the sparks 
fly in his face.— Ben Franklin 

Never let a day or night pass with- 
out remembering what God has done 
for you. 



Letter To The Editor: 

I wish to thank the Walton Life 
Squad for their action in helping my 
wife and two friends to St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Monday morning, January 
11, 1971, after an accident occuring 
on 1-71. The squad was very kind, 
courteous, and also very efficient in 
action. Your community must be 
proud to know that their welfare is 
in capable hands. Thank you again. 
Mr. Chester Simpson 
F, danger, Kentucky 



being said about the Administration. 
They are not true. This has been a 
company of honorable and able men, 
led by a President of singular courage 
and compassion in the face of a some- 
times awful knowledge of the prob- 
lems and the probabilities that con- 
front him." 

He concluded, "it is necessary for 
members of the Administration to be 
far more attentive to what it is the 
.President has said and proposed. Time 
and time again the President has said 
things of startling insight, taken po- 
sitions of great political courage and 
intellectual daring, only to be greeted 
with silence or incomprehension . .". 

Moynihan who has been a counsel- 
lor to the Presdent is leaving the Ad- 
ministration to return to his teaching 
post at Harvard, so he will not lose 
tenure gained there before he came 
to Washington. 




BLACKMAG/C 



IN FORMER DAYS, 
AUMOST EVERY SAILOR'S 
W1 FE KEPT A. BLACK CAT 
AS A GOOD-LUCK CHARM 
"TO ENSURETHE SAFETY 
OF HER HUSBAND 
AT SEA. 



TOOTH TROUBLE 

THE MOST COMMON CAUSES 
OF POOR APPETITE IN OLD CATS 
ARE MOUTH INFECTION, A 
BROKEN TOOTH OR TARTAR 
ACCUMULATION. HAVE A 
VETERINARIAN EXAMINE 
YOUR CAT'S TEETH EVERY 
SIX. MONTH S . 




AUCTION 



BUTLER AUCTION HOUSE 

BUTLER, KENTUCKY PHONE 472-2880 

Paint - Brushes - Rollers - New & Used Furniture - Stoves • Rags 



CARL LANCASTER 



AUCTIONEER-BROKER 
We Conduct Private Sales - We Boy, Sell and Trade 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 

Covington - Kentucky 



We Moke Loons On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
F. H. A. and Mortgages! 



BIT 'N' SPUR CLUB 

The Bit & Spur Saddle Club held 
its first meeting of 1971 on January 
8th at the home of Greg Stephens. 
The main purpose of the meeting was 
to elect new officers for this year. 
They are: 

President, Lynn Koshin; Vice-Pres- 
ident, Debbie Ryan; Secretary, Sarah 
Darghty; Treasurer, Beth Kohsin; Re- 
porters, Elaine Campbell and Debby 
Lamb; Pledge Leader, Steve Cauthen; 
Activity Leader, Paula Dunn. 

Plans were discussed for this year 
and a demonstration was given by 
Paula Dunn. There was to be a 
skating party at Dick Ockerman's on 
Jan. 9. The next meeting will be held 
February 5th. 

New members present were Jeannie 
Rice, Barbara Baumgardner and Rob- 
bie Ockerman. 

Other members present were Sandy, 
Kathy and Karen Lanter, Greg Step- 
hens, Debby Harden, Tim Dunn, 
Beth Kohsin, Elaine Campbell, Debbie 
Ryan, Randy Angel, Steve Cauthen, 
Danny Harden, Glennie Beach, Deb- 
by Lamb, Dick Ockerman, Lynn 
Kohsin, Paula Dunn, and Janetta Rice. 

Parents and leaders present were 
Mr. and Mrs. Kohsin, Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephens, Mrs. Dunn, Mr. Harden, 
Dr. Lanter, Mrs. Cauthen and Mrs. 
Napier.— Reporter 

Mother: Our church is sure going 
to pot. The pews are too hard, the 
choir is off key and the sermons are 
poor. Little daughter: But mother, 
what can you expect for a dime? 



'The Restless Ones" at 
The First Baptist Church 

"The Restless Ones," considered the 
most successful motion picture yet 
produced by Evangelist Billy Graham, 
will be shown in Walton on January 
27th, in the First Baptist Church, be- 
ginning at 6:30 p. m. 

With the accent on youth, this 
feature-length film deals imaginatively 
and dramatically with the teenage 
crisis. With a background setting pro- 
vided by the 1963 Billy Graham Los 
Angeles Crusade, and artfully woven 
into the story pattern, "The Restless 
Ones" is a hard-hitting, bold approach 
to our social problems. 

Here is a film which dares to be 
different, a story which will stir the 
heart and mind. Having seen "The 
Restless Ones," you will never be the 
same. The film has skillfully brought 
into focus the contemporary plight of 
both parents and teenagers. 

I 

A big game hunter was on his way 

back to camp one evening when an 
enormous tiger appeared out of the 
jungle not 20 feet away. As the tiger 
was about to spring, the hunter fired 
his last cartridge and missed. The 
tiger sprang too far and landed 15 
feet beyond the hunter, who then ran 
for camp and got there safely. The 
next day the hunter went behind the 
camp to practice a little shooting at 
close range. He heard a strange noise 
in the brush and went to invetf 
It was the tiger — practicing short leaps. 



Attention Kenton County Taxpayers 

SPECIAL COLLECTION OFFICE 

INDEPENDENCE COURTHOUSE-Thursday, 9:00 a. m. to 3:00 
p. m. and Saturday, 9 a. m. to 12 noon. Please bring your Tax Bill. 

COVINGTON OFFICE— Monday through Friday, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 
/ p. m., Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 12:00 noon. 



JOSEPH L. NIE 



SHERIFF OF KENTON COUNTY 



COVINGTON, KY. 



Homelite Chain Saw Dealer 

Now Open In Independence 

CABER'S SERVICE CENTER 

Repairs Most Makes of Chain Saws & Small Engines 

Hand Saw Sharpening by Machine, Includes Setting 

and Oiling — Reasonable Rates 

—SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY— 

Open Monday thru Friday, 8 a. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 

5253 Madison Pike, Independence, Ky. 



r* 



■ 



/ 



.Z5l.il 1 



Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 21, 1971 




Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mum charge of 50c for 25 words or 
less— over 25 words, 2 cents per 
word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



For Sale— 



WILL TRADE^- Gentle registered 
Polled Hereford bull, r l year said 8 
months old, for registered Hereford 
cow. 356-9846. 2t-2c 



FOR SALE — Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vaccinated. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

tf-2c 



FOR SALE— Purebred German Shep- 
herd pups, cheap; also Chihuahua 
stud service. Phone 654-3914, or 
write Doris Brownfield, Route 2, 
Butler, Ky. 41006 2t-3* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE— Hay. 485-7609. 2t>3* 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impala Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone. 
Ky. tf-47 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE— 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cash registers, 
and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also carry 
ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. For free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. tf-8c 

VACUUM CLEANER— Paint damag- 
ed vacuum cleaners still in factory 
cartons, complete with all 7 cleaning 
tools. Reduced to $16.50 cash price 
or terms available. Call 689-7936. 

2t-3c 

FOR SALE or TRADE— House with 
approximately 1 acre of land. Call 
485-4652. 4t-52* 



SECTION «jm? 



RATES OF WALTON ADVERTISER 

Local Display 60c ger column inch 

Foreign Display (6c per line) 84c per column inch 

Mats or Plates — Deadline Monday Noon 

Classified Ads, Cards of Thanks 50c minimum 

(2c per word if in excess of 25 words) — Payable In 
Advance. No Phone Calls. Deadline Tuesday, 10 a. m. 

Legal Advertising — $1.00 per column inch 

—OFFICE HOURS— 

Monday-Friday _ 8 a. m. to 12 noon, 12:30 to 4:30 

Social News Deadline 12:00 Noon, Monday 

Phone 485-4962 



FOR SALE— Mixed hay. 
356-2634. 



SEWING MACHINES-Brand new 
1971 models, equipped to zig zag, 
sews forward and reverse, embroider, 
darn, make buttonholes, even write 
names. $38.00 cash price or terms WfUlfPft 
available. Call 359-4720. 2t-3c "WlHvU 



A woman stepped off the penny 
scale and turned to her husband. Eye- 
ing his wife, he asked: Well, what's 
the verdict? A little overweight? "Oh, 
no," said the wife, "I wouldn't say 
that. But according to that height 
chart on the scale, I should be about 
eight inches taller." 



Services — 



WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists; radios and stereos. Used TV's, 
perfect condition, guaranteed 30 
days. 9:00 a? m. to 6:00 p. m. 
Phone 485-7616. tf-3c 



JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. tf-lc 



Telephone 

3t2* 



FOR SALE— 1960 4-wheel drive Jeep 
truck, 1-ton capacity. Telephone 

485-7179. lt-3* 

<> 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
'fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
■seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
■Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-10c 

FOR SALE — Two snow tires, on rims, 
size 13x7.50 for Chevy II. Phone 
291-4518. 2t-3* 

FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. tf-49c 



FOR SALE— Fresh lard. Telephone 
356-2182. lt-3* 



TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— 4 new Uniroyal H78xl5 
glass belted blackwall tires, taken 
off new truck. Will sell reasonably. 
R. Cooper, 356-6822. lt-3* 

FOR SALE— 1965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 

SEWING MACHINE — Brand Imi 
1970 model, does all fancy work, 
even writes names, simply turn lever 
and sew. Price reduced to $28.00 
•cash price because of small scratches 
in shipping, or terms available. Call 
689-7936. 2t-3c 



FOR SALE — Four heavy springer 
Holstein heifers. O. J. Worthington, 
Highway 14, Piner, Ky. Telephone 
356-9029. 2t-2* 

INVENTORY Clearance Sale on ap- 
parel at Boone Saddle Shop. West- 
ern and English apparel, saddles and 
tack. Hay and Purina feed; horses 
boarded. 1971 model Lane trailer. 
8179 Dixie Highway, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 371-1412. lt-3c 

FOR SALE— 1970 Jacobsen 12 h. p. 
Chief tractor and 48-inch mower. 
356-9720 after 7 p. m. 3t-2c 

FOR SALE— Duroc and Hampshire 
feeder pigs; also a few 1 50-lb. shoats. 
Gordon Moore, Old Lexington Pike, 
Walton, Ky. 493-5391. 2t-3* 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— 60x1 2-ft. mobile home, 
situated on approximately 4 acres; 
ideally located between 1-71 and 
1-75, with beautiful view; about 350 
feet frontage on Route 491. Small 
tobacco base. 493-5230. lt-3c 



FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5-speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 



... FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

VACUUM CLEANERS — Recon- 
ditioned in A-l shape. Powerful 
motor, has all 5 cleaning attach- 
ments. $15.00 cash price, or E-Z 
terms available. Call 359-4720. 

.. 2t-3c 

FOR SALE— Hay and straw. Tom 
Dickerson, Sunman, Ind. Phone 
812-576-3322. 2t-2* 

FOR SALE^Hay for bedding, 30c 
per bale; approximately 250 bales. 
356-7423. 2t-2* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing 

■ of all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 
249-A Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. tf-3c 



SPECIALI 3 ACRES — Four bedroom stucco home; no basement; oil 
furnace; stationary tubs; tile bath; built-in kitchen and stove; small 
barn, pond, chicken house. Located on Dixon Road, near Piner 
School. Price $12,500. $3,500 down. 

1 ACRE — Three bedroom brick, full basement. Last house on left, Way- 
man Drive. Price $21,000. 

8 ACRES— Fowler's Creek Road, near Route 17; suitable for mobile 
home parking. Price $3,950. 

6V2 ACRES — Kenton and Visalia Pike, near Staff ordsburg Methodist 
Church. Price $7,500. 

19 ACRES — Five room semi-modern home, near Oak Ridge Baptist 
Church, Route 16. Make offer. $36,000. 

44 ACRES — No buildings, on Bnunlage Road, near REA, 4 miles from 
Industrial Park. May consider splitting. Price $44,000. 

58 ACRES — (More or less). Five room modern frame home; one barn 
36x36, lV^-acre fishing lake, Vi-acre tobacco base; 2 -room cottage; gas 
and water; perfect for a business or subdivision; across from REA 
building, Walton-Nicholson Pike. Price $69,000. Will consider split. 

144 ACRES — Two barns, fair fence, plenty water, 2-acre tobacco base, 
9-acre corn base, 35 acres creek bottom, plenty blacktop road frontage. 
Ideal spot to build a new home. Located on State Route 159, 7 miles 
East of Falmouth, \Vi miles North of Kincaid Park. Owner, Leo 
Ryan. Full price, $23,750. 30% down, balance 18 years. 

90 ACRES — Grant County, Crittenden, (more or less), 5-room house, 
barn, 1-acre tobacco base, near city water and new golf course. Ideal 
for developing. 

IVl WOODED ACRES— Piner, near the Baptist Church. Full price 
$2,750. See sign. 

REL S. (BUCK) WAYMAN 

FORMERLY OF REL C. WAYMAN & SONS - 356-5068 

Real Estate Sales of All Kinds— Including Auctions 

NEW AGENTS: 

Thomas Mershon— 356-9093 Jerry Hatfield— 231-5546 

— — — — — — — ■ — — w— — ■————■— 



HELP WANTED— Now hiring. We 
need a woman who can work three 
evenings, 8:00 to 11:00, and earn 
better than $75.00 commission. Car 
and phone necessary. 371-7209. 

lt-3c 

WILL DO ironing in your home. 
Katherine Hopperton, 85 High St., 
Walton, Ky. 2t-2* 

WANTED — Baby sitting, responsible 
teenager. Debbie Soden. Phone 
356-2758. 2t-2c 

WANTED — Farms and country 
homes. Any condition, cash buyers 
waiting. Free appraisal. Will come 
to your property at any time. Rel 
S. (Buck) Wayman, 356-5068. We 
specialize in the sale of farms and 
country homes. 6t-51c 

WANTED TO BUY— Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 

HELP WANTED— Someone to man- 
age a service station, locally. Call 
471-6831, or after 6:00 p. m., call 
662-1940. 2t-2c 



f.isliionfqiie 



by MABEL WESTERBERG 

Fashion Co-ordinator 

Queen's- Way to Fashion 



JSlj 



COLES BEAUTY SHOP — Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 ancO$10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly^ j^L-Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 

LIVESTOCK HAUI ,ING^~Rohert 
Richardson, 356-6749 or 291-8370. 

16t-44* 



WANT TO RENT— Tobacco base, 
around Crittenden, Bracht or Wal- 
ton. Call 356-5652. 2t-2* 



Belts have re-established 
themselves as necessities in the 
fashionable wardrobe. Women 
who had grown happily ac- 
customed to the freedoms of 
beltlessness and insisted they . 
. would never return to their con- 
t> fines, have slowly given in. 

Belts of all sizes and styles 
are being worn with everything 
from pants to minks. The heavy 
leather belt is sharing the spot- 
light with the popular chain 
varieties as the status accessory 
with casual apparel. However, 
leather models are usually worn 
slightly loose, sitting on top of 
the hip bone. 

Brass-riveted belts or those 
with antiqued brass buckle 
holes carried- all the way 
around the waist look the new- 
est this year. So do skinny belts 
in leather, perhaps only Vz" 
wide. They're often worn in 
groups of twos and threes in 
different colors above the waist, 
at the waist and on the hip 
bone. Long chain necklaces can 
be fashionably switched and 
worn at the waist with pants 
and at-home skirts. 

We do not know how inexpensive 
the seeds of happiness are or we 
should scatter them oftener. 



DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or .824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf 29c 



ELOISE BEAUTY SALON-125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS— For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC- 
IATION, 30 Needmore St., Walton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE - CO^ 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Oc 



PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
-work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. tf-34c 

STEWART'S CUSTOM FARM 
WORK— Plowing, disking, grass 
seed sowing, mowing and baling 
hay, posthole digging. Call for 
free estimate. Phone 356-5700 or 
356-9905. tf-13c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE— 
Now written to everyone, if driv- 
ing record is good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington. Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cot 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m., 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. tf-38c 

SEPTIC TANKS-Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS— Precast; . sales 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 

BUILD UP ROOFING — Shingles, 
gutter work, patch work of all kinds. 
New roof warranty. Free estimates. 
Phone 356-9853 or 356-7100. 

20t-39* 

FASH30NETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, personal 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fashionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 



A 



WANTED— Cash for any kind of 
real estate, regardless of price or 
condition. Rel S. (Buck) Wayman, 
356-5068. tf-51c 



For Renf— 



HELP WANTED— Male, electric ex- 
perience necessary; full or part 
time; good salary. 485-7244. 2t2* 

HELP WANTED— Full or part time. 
Men or women; unlimited oppor- 
tunity. 485-75 60, 371-5023. 4t-l* 

Classified Advertising Gets Results 



FOR RENT— Sleeping room, and a 
bachelor apartment. Call after 5:00 
p. m., 485-4536 or 485-7319. 85 
North Main St., Walton. tf-3c 



NOTICE- 



LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON-Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday" thru Saturday. Telephone 
493-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 



YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER — In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
rlines, $59.95; used machines as 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, hi- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoover 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Girard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 years in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00. tf-29c 



NOTICE — Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 



INTERIOR PAINTING 

EXPERTLY DONE 
—FREE ESTIMATES- 
RALPH FOLTZ, 356-5987 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 



HELP WANTED 



r 



Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to — 



BORON STOP 138 



1-75 b 338 



RICHWOOD, KY. 




SAVING 
REGULARLY 




FOR YOUR FUTURE SECURITY? 

Dixie State Bank 



Save by Mail! 



Walton, Ky. 

Phone 485-4121 




Interest Checks Moiled Semi-Annually 



Member F. D. I. C. 
Accounts Insured to $20,000.00 



i 



Thursdoy^January 21, 1971 



Walton Advertise, Walton, Kentucky 

i I. V 



Slaffordsburg 

Mill J. A. Kccncy, Reporter 

The Homemakers Club met at the 
church on Tuesday, January 12 with 
only a fair attendance. Several of the 
members were ill, including the pres- 




BY LAWRENCE W. ALTHOUSE 



~r 



TWO LOST SONS 

Lesson for January 24, 1971 



Background Scripture: luke 15 

Some have called the Parable 
of the Prodigal Son the greatest 
short story in the world. 

Yet, for all this popularity, it 
is often misunderstood — or per- 
haps, not fully understood. Many 
people seem to miss the fact that 
| Jesus is concern- 
ed with two sons, 
! not just one. Both 
are central to the 
story: "Jesus said, 
'There was a man 
who had two 
sons." 




Rev. Althouse 



The younger son 
who "came to 
himself" 



This is the son 
with whom we are best acquaint- 
ed. We have known many people 
like him; perhaps we have even 
seen a bit of him in ourselves. 
Despite a loving father and a life 
that must have been materially 
quite adequate, he is restless and 
brazenly asks his father for his 
share of the estate so that he 
might leave home. 

How typically he represents 
many young people: he wants to 
be independent, but he asserts 
his independence while continu- 
ing to live on ihe resources that 
come from the one from whom 
he is separating himself. He 
leaves home because he obviously 
wants to be free of all its encum- 
berances. At last, he will do as he 
pleases, when he pleases, and 
how he pleases. No one will dom- 
inate him. 

Yet, like many of us he comes 
to find that when we are "free to 
do as we please," we are not real- 
ly free but often dominated and 
in bondage to our own immature 
impulses and drives. Free of our 
parents or some other authority, 
we become slaves to something 
else. We exchange one kind of 
"bondage for another. 

But^ at last the younger son 
"comes to himself" — begins to be- 
come his true self. He begins to 
realize that in being the rebel- 
lious, prodigal son. he was not 
really himself. He had tried out 
a role that he came to realize was 
not really his. Thus, Jesus is tell- 
ing us that when a man is "away 
from God," when he sins, he is 
not his real self, not the self 
which he can be and was created 
to be. 

The son who stayed at home 
for the wrong reasons 

But there was another son, the 
eldest son, to be exact. Jewish 
law indicated that he was to re- 
receive two-thirds of his father's 
estate and his younger brother 
one-third. We find nothing about 
him until his younger brother re- 
turns home. Then it becomes ob- 
vious that he, unlike his brother, 
remained with his father, assum- 
ing his share of thp labors of the 
family farm. 

At first it warms our heart to 
think that, though the father's 
h^art was broken by his prodigal 
son, he at least had the faithful 
love and assistance of another 
son. But it was obvious that, al- 
though the eldest son had done 
the right thing, he had done it 
for the wrong reasons. Though he 
had not rebelled openly, neither 
did he serve his father for any 
admirable reason. 

It was very apparent that what 
had seemed to be years of obe- 
dience and faithfulness to his 
father were, in reality, years of 
grudging service. The labor he 
performed was apparently, not 
out of love, but in anticipation of 
what he would receive in return 
for it. He was not working for his 
father, but for himself. His re- 
spectable behavior had always, it 
seems, masked a resentment to- 
ward his father. 
The son who was really "lost" 

Actually, this man is even less 

attractive than his profligate bro- 
ther. There is no compassion for 
his brother: he calls him "your 
son," not "my brother." He was 
obviously a self-righteous man, 
proud of his goodness, ^certain it 
should bring him certain rewards. 

The Father had two sons and 
one "came to himself" and re- 
turned home. But one, though he 
had never left home, remained 
"lost." God, it seems, always has- 
more difficulty with this kind of 
son. 

(Baud on outlinot copyrighted by tho 
Oivition of Christian Education, National 
Council of tho Church** of Christ in tho 
U.S.A. Released by Community Prow 
Cwvtet.) 



ident, Mrs. Marie Rich, Mrs. Roy 
Payne and Mrs. L. Wayman. Mrs. 
J. Shaw, vice-president, conducted the 
meeting. Answering roll call were: 
Mrs. L. J. Rapp, Mrs. James Elam, 
Mrs. C. Hill, Mrs. M. Mann, Mrs. 
L. Faulkner, Mrs. D. Nitschke, Mrs. 
F. Keeney, Mrs. Edith Ware, Mrs. M. 
Wharton, Mrs. V. Damice, Mrs. V. 
Lynch, Mrs. 'J. Shaw, and two guests, 
Mrs. Russell Rector and Mrs. Carl 
Simpson. Some questions concerning 
the program for next year were dis- 
cussed and filled out. Mrs. Lynch, 
who was hostess for the day, at this 
time called us to lunch, which is al- 
ways a pleasant interlude. A plate 
was filled for Mrs. Florence Stein, a 
member who is a shut-inN When the 
tables were cleared and dishes washed, 
we reassembled to hear the lesson of 
the day, which was very interestingly 
given by Mrs. Rector and Mrs. Simp- 
son from the Ook Island Club. The 
topic was Home Nursing and some 
very clever ways were presented and 
discussed for the comfort and help 
of the ill in our families. Leaders 
were named for the projects for the 
remainder of the year. We decided 
to meet Jan. 17 at the church. The 
February meeting will also be at the 
church with Mrs. M. Mann as host- 
ess on Feb. 2. 

Miss Neva Jo Finnell has been ill 
for several days. 

Dawson Ballinger is better but not 
yet OK. Hope he is soon feeling fine. 

The George Binder family and 
Woody Armstrong are in Florida, near 
Orlando, where they plan to make 
their home. 

Mrs. John Shaw has an injured 
tendon, which must have rest to 



T— 



heal, so she carrier her arm in a sling. 
Carsee Brinkley is a little better 
each week. We think he will improve 
much faster when warmer weather 
comes. 




School Menu . . . 

Walton- Verona Schools 

January 18 — Pork barbecue, butter- 
ed cabbage, creamed com, apple cheese 
crisp, and milk. 

January 19 — Frankfurter, sauerkraut, 
mashed motatoes, ginger bread with 
carmel sauce, bread, butter, and milk. 

January 20 — Fried chicken, baked 
potatoes, buttered peas, jello with fruit, 
bread, butter, and milk. 

January 21 — Roast beef, gravy, but- 
tered noodles, green beans, hot bis- 
cuits", butter, apple butter and milk. 

January 22 — Vegetable soup, crack- 
ers, meat loaf sandwich, chocolate 
cake, and milk. 

i 

If ignorance is bliss, why aren't 
more people happy? 



WALLPAPER 

FOY JOHNSON FINE PAINT - 

Picture Frames - All Sizes 

WALL-TEX ART SUPPLIES 



LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 

264 MAIN STREET FLORENCE, KY. 

—Parking In Rear — Phone 371-7921— 



ANNUAL WARSAW 



Charity Ball 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1971 

HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM - 9:30 UNTIL 1:30 

Sponsored by the Warsaw Lions Club 
FEATURING JIMMY JAMES & HIS ORCHESTRA 

Table Reservations Availalbe For Parties 
If Requested In Time! 

WARSAW, KENTUCKY 

FOR RESERVATIONS WRITE— W. G. BEVERLY 
WARSAW, KY. — OR CALL 567-4601 

No Reservations Will Be Made Unless 
Cash Accompanies Request! 

Couples Only...... — 

$8.00 PER COUPLE 



Hungry Jacks 
Smorgasbord 



NOON 


M fill 


NOON 


NIGHT 1 


tl.UU 


NIGHT 


and ft 


V Plus Tax 


and 


SUNDAY 


r " 


SUNDAY 



20 SALADS' — 10 HOT FOODS 
6 DESSERTS — 8 BEVERAGES 

You can't cook at rjome for these prices. Don't settle for a sandwich. 
Come, visit us for a full meal. Bring the entire family— Aunt Louise, 
Uncle Ralph, Grandma, Grandpa, and Cousin Martha. 



8048 Dixie Highway 

Comer Industrial Road & Route 25 



Open 7 Days 



FORMERLY OLD FARM 



371-8156 

Florence, Kentucky 
Open 7 Days 



LOSE DRIVER LICENSES 

Listed below are the names of in- 
dividuals who have lost their drivers 
license for the week ending Jan. 8th, 
as released by the Department of 
Public Safety to the Traffic Safety 
Coordinating Committee, Frankfort: 

BOONE COUNTY: Gary Wayne 
Cook, 16, of 14 Shenandoah Drive, 
Florence, six months; Ronnie Wayne 
Cook, 31, of 147 North Main St., 
Walton, until May 30, 1971; James 
Edward Moore, 36, of 875 Idlewild 
Road, Burlington, until Dec. 7, 1971; 
Verlin Duane Drake, 37, of 67 Green 
Drive, Florence, until June 21, 1971; 
Edgar Lee Herrington, 33, of 8 Tee 
St., Florence, until June 7, 1971; 
Robert Stanley Franxman, 19, of 112 
St. Jude Circle, Florence, 15 months. 

KENTON COUNTY: Clinton K. 
Spencer, 21, of Route 1, Morning 
View, one year; Arthur Cecil Moore, 
49, of 416 Fox St., Erlanger, six 
months; Elizabeth Tompkins Mc- 
Gearty, 65, of 3812 Lori Drive, Er- 
langer, until June 21, 1971; Charles 
Abney, 39, of 7593 Richardson Road, 
Independence, until June 14, 1971; 
John Lewallen Meeks, 24, of St. 
Mary's Road, Demossville, 6 months. 

Learning begins as curiosity. 



CARD OF THANKS- 

The family of William Gamble 
wishes to thank each and everyone 
who was so kind to us during the long 
illness and death of our beloved father 
and husband. A special thanks for 
the cards, many calls, food, flowers, 
and other acts of kindness; to the 
ministers who called at different times, 
and Chambers & Grubbs. May God 
bless each of you. 

THE FAMILY-^QF 
lt-3c WILLIAMCJAMBLE 




Nowadays the/accent may be on 
youth — but the /stress is on the par- 
ents. 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation & Repair 

Precast Cisterns and 

Backhoe Work. 

356-5804 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 

Samples Shown In the Home 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 'b INSURED 
—ACOUSTIC CEILINGS INSTALLED— 

M. SIMPSON - 341-7555 




^ DISCOVER THE 

BIG DIFFERENCE 



IN LOW-COST AUTO 
INSURANCE 

You do save money with our 
Special Budget Automobile 
Policy. What's more, you get 
quality protection and 
hometown agency service 
. . . service you can count 
on at all times. 

These p/us benefits add up 
to a big difference for you. 

Call or write us today for 
full facts. 

J. B. JOHNSON 

93 North Main Street 
WALTON, KY. 

485-7102 



oStom 



REPRESENTING 

T0M0BILE MUTUAL 
INSURANCE COMPANY 
HOME OFFICE* COLUMBUS, OHIO 



'A 



Wsm m m* 



<i$> 



4» 



<TO .TURN AeAIH 

s> 
In winter the pond freezes oyer, and the old mill wheel 
Is idle. But although the landscape appears dormant, there) 
is hidden life beneath the surface. One day it will be 
spring again, with water rushing over the mill wheel and 
corn being ground into meal. , 

If you have been living in a winter of your own, why 
not take a lesson from the old mill? The winters of our 
life are bleak — they are hard to weather. But forever and 
ever there is the chance to start, again. Spring will come 
and your church will sustain you through doubt and dis- 
appointment and give you promise of another chance — 
another life. 








V J| 1 



Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 

Galatians Galatians Pbilippians Colossiant I Tbessalonians 1 Tbessalonians Hebrews 

3:12-17 1:1-10 4:13-18 2^1-4 

Copyright 1971 Kelrter Advertising Service, Inc., Strasburg, Virginia 



Scriptures selected by the American Bible Society 



The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 



ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 

Phone 485-4800 North Main St., Walton 

BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PEOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

Phone 485-4888 Walton, Kentucky 

BENTON-BONAR DEPT. STORE 

Phone 485-4495 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phone 3562172 Walton, Kentacky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, K>. Phone 371-8836 or 371-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Kentacky 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 358-3981 Nkholaon, Kentucky 



( 



HALL ELEC. & APPL SERVICE 

Phone 485-4087 Walton, Kentacky 

MOTCH— JEWELERS 

613 Madison Avenue Covington, Kentacky 

READNOUR COAL & FEED 

Phone 485-4504 Walton, Kentacky 

ROBERTS INSURANCE, INC. 

485-4693 or 485-7262 Walton, Kentacky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ah" Ryan 485-4161 Walton, Ky. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 485-9111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 485-4962 "Your Local Newspaper** 

WALTON HDW. & DRY GOODS 

Phone 485-4000 Cliff Ryan, Prop. 

DIXIE STATE BANK WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 

485-41*1 Walton, Kentacky Phone 489-4163 Walton, Kentacky 

i i i ^T i h i i jff ir jjjF~ 



fi 



X 



Wotftn Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 21, 1971 



20 




Ago . . . 



Thursday, January 18, 1951 
WALTON— 

Our community sustained a great 
loss in the passing of W. O. Rouse. 
He was a good citizen, a man of high 
• ideals, he loved his family, his fri- 
ends, and was a friend to the friend- 
less and needy; he loved his home, 
/ his church, his friends, and was a de- 
voted and faithful member of the 
Masonic lodge; he made a record at- 
tendance in the Methodist Sunday 
School, having attended something in 
excess of 1,800 consecutive Sundays. 
In October, 1950, he was presented a 
beautiful 35-year pin for record at- 
tendance of which he was very proud. 

Dawson Hightower and Bruce Cox $ 
sold 866 pounds of tobacco at the 
Independent Tobacco Warehouse in 
Erlanger, for an average of $66 per 
hundredweight 

Charles Worthington has been ap- 
pointed police judge in Walton. 



3- 



Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Sizemore 
spent the weekend in Indiana, visiting 
relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Watkins were 
the weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Andy Jarman and son, and Mrs. Em- 
ma Vest. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lee McElroy 
spent the weekend with relatives here 
and Verona. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Stephenson 
entertained with a six o'clock dinner 
on Sunday for Mr. and Mrs. C. O. 
Carlisle, Mr. and Mrs. Ward Rice 
and son, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Lancas- 
ter, Betty Maloney, Guy Carlisle, 
Bobby Lancaster, Carole DeMoisey, 
and Joe Stephenson. 
. The Gladys Hopewell Circle of the 
Walton Baptist Church met in the 
home of Mrs. Vera Wright, Monday 
evening. 
BEAVER LICK— 

Joe Besterman, Jr., of the U. S. 
Army, stationed in New York, is 



ORDINANCE NO. 1970-27- 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing Northwest Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interest of its citizens and the best interest of persons owning 
and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; said 
territory lying adjacent to the present northwest corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE. THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section 1. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth clan 
city. 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 
BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, the point of inter- 
section of the North right-of-way line of Beaver Road with the East right-of- 
way line of 1-75; thence 'with the existing city limits for three calls; thence 
Easterly 1050 feet with the North right-of-way line of Beaver Road; thence 
Northwesterly 200 feet; thence Northwesterly 1640 feet, more or less, to the 
East right-of-way line of 1-75; thence South 1080 feet, more or less, with the 
East right-of-way line of 1-75 to the existing city limits; thence South 230 feet 
with the existing city limits to the beginning. 

Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall be- 
come a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 5 members of the Council on the 15th day 
of December, 1970. 

K. DALE STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 
ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 



spending a furlough with his mother, 
Mrs. Lee Besterman. 

Miss Jill Feagan and Miss Patsy 
Martin were shopping in Beaver, last 
Saturday. 
VERONA— 

"Bubbie" Leathers, who spent his 
vacation with his mother and other 
relatives and friends here, has returned 
to his studies in Bloomington, 111. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Waller spent 
Sunday afternoon in the W. E. Wal- 
ler home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dud Chapman and 
Vevie Webster have bought and mov-- 
ed to the Lizzie Vest house, Verona. 

Mr. and Mrti Walter Vest and 
daughters entertained on Christmas 
Day for Mr. and Mrs. James Vest 
and son, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Waller 
and sons, and Mrs. Lizzie Noel. 

Mrs. W. E. Waller and sons spent 
New Year's Eve in the J. T. Lamn 
home. 
STAFFORDSBURG— 

Miss Minnie Rapp returned this 
week after spending Christmas with 
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Rapp of Maggee, 
Arkansas. 

One of our most faithful Sunday 
school teachers, Mrs. Dawson Bal- 
linger, was kept in by a cold, but is 
now better. 

Mr. and Mis. William Gadker vis- 
ited a short time Sunday with Mrs. 
Stella Richardson. 

Mrs. W. E. Hanna, Mrs. J. J. Bar- 
nett, Mrs. D. Ballinger and Mrs. J. 
A. Keeney attended a very much en- 
joyed talk and picture show by Mrs. 
T. J. Liggett at the Walton Christian 
Church, last Thursday. 

Vacant lots and vacant minds us- 
ually become dumping grounds for 
rubbish. 




Home 
Agent's 
Party 
Line 

By 

Nancy Norman 

What are the most flammable fab- 
rics? The nice, soft napped fabrics 
are most flammable — flannelette and 
brushed nylon and brushed synthetics; 
pile fabrics, such as corduroy, velvet 
and similar materials; loosely woven 
fabrics; and lightweight, fluffy sheers 
used for party clothes, according to 
specialists at the University of Rhode 
Island Cooperative Extension Service^ 
Rayon, cotton, linen and some nylons 
are highly flammable, although one 
nylon called "nomex," is flame re- 
sistant, according to the Extension 
Service. Other flammable fibers are 
acetates, such as arnel, acele, celanese 
and chrom-spun, and acrylic fibers 
and polyesters. Silk and wool bum 
very slowly, but the more sheer they 
are, the more readily they will bum. 

Washable fabrics, however, may 
be dipped in a flame-retardant solu- 
tion, and non-washables be sprayed 
with the same solution. The solution 
can be made at home and applied to 
clothing, curtains, draperies, upholstery 
and scatter rugs, as well as to holiday 
costume materials and decorations. 

According to . the University of 
Rhode Island specialists, one solution 
which can be used for garments and 
household fabrics (expect those made 
of rayon or resin treated cottons, crash- 
resistant, wrinkle-proof and permanent 
press), is made by dissolving seven 



ounces of borax and three ounces of 
boric acid in two quarts of hot water. 
The boric acid powder will dissolve 
more readily if mixed with a small 
amount -of the water to make a paste 
before stirring it and the borax into 
the hot water. 

For resin-treated fabrics and rayon, 
the University Cooperative Extension 
Service recommends a solution of 12 



ounces of diammonium phosphate dis- 
solved in two quarts of water. 

, . 

A veterinarian quit his practice and 
successfully ran for the legislature. 
One day, in the midst of a bitter de- 
bate, an opponent asked with a sneer. 
"Isn't it true that you're actually an 
animal doctor?" "Indeed it is," he 
replied. "Are you ill?" 



CHARLES HENRY & THE SPOILERS 

WITH THE FABULOUS MR. SPOONS 

AT FIRST & LAST CHANCE - ROUTE 17 

FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY 
January 15-16-17 & January 22-23-24 

Friday, 7:00 'til ? - Saturday, 8:00 'til ? 
Sunday, 5:00 'til ? 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne— 635-2895 




Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pood 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1970-28- 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing North Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interest of its citizens and for the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present north corporate limits of the City 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

Section 1. That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 

Section 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, said point being in the 
West right-of-way line of U. S. 25 and being approximately 100 feet North of 
its intersection with Kentucky Highway 16; thence Northerly with the West 
right-of-way line of U. S. 25, 750 feet, more or less, to the line of Parker; 
thence Northwesterly with the line of Parker 3750 feet, more or less; thence 
Southwesterly with the line of West 350 feet, more or less, to the right-of-way 
of 1-75 northbound to 1-75 ramp; thence Southerly with the right-of-way of 
said ramp 3040 feet to the East right-of-way line of 1-75; thence Southerly with 
the right-of-way line of 1-75, 850 feet, more or less, to the existing City Limits; 
thence with the existing City Limits for four calls Easterly 1200 feet, more or 
less; thence Southeasterly 1250 feet, more or less; thence Northeasterly 1350 
feet, more or less; thence Southeasterly 760 feet, more or less, to the beginning. 

Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the. Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon the passage thereof, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 5 members of the Council on the 15th day 
of December, 1970. ' m , _, „ „, , _ . , 

K. DALE STEPHENS, Mayor, City of Walton, Kentucky 
ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c 



TRI-C0UNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING & REPAIR • 

Trenching & Installation of Gas & Water Service 

824-6665 or 356-7477 



■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■! 

jCOL.KENNER'SJ 
j Appliance Co. j 

= 5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440: 

: ! 

j SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS, ! 
■ REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS, ETC. ■ 

(Over 20 Years In the Service Business) ■ 



BankAmericard and Master Charge Honored 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG & COLEMAN GAS & OIL STOVES! 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1970-29- 



Open Monday thru Wednesday 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 



LIFE BEGINS WITH A HOME OF YOUR \ 



OWN. SEE FIRST 



An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to the 
existing Westerly Corporate Limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems it 
to be in the best interests of its citizens and for the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present westerly corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate ter- 
ritory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: # 

Section 1 That all the territory located within the boundary hereinafter set 
out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth class 

Section 2 The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing West City Limits said point being CEIIED A I CAD 

650 feet, more or less, Northerly from the intersection of the West City Limits ILI/CKAL I UK 

with Kentucky Highway 16; thence Northwesterly with the projection of the 
common line of Parker and West and with said line 3850 feet, more pr less, 
of sufficient to reach the rear lot line of Parker; thence Northeasterly with the 
rear line of Parker 1250 feet, more or less; thence Southeasterly with the north 
tract line of Parker 3170 feet, more or less, or sufficient to reach the existing 
City Limits; thence Southwesterly with the existing City Limits 1360 feet, 
more or less, or sufficient to reach the beginning. 

Section 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as 
by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sections 
81.100 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon the passage thereof, the territory set out in detail in Section 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will be henceforth con- 
sidered as within the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

Section 4. All ordinances, resolutions or parts thereof, in conflict herewith, 
are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

Section 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be held by 
a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining 
sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it' being hereby expressly declared that the 
remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 5 members of the Council on the 1 5th day 

of December, 1970., ^ ^^ MayQr ^ rf Walton ^^ ■ £JSJS2B » SrtT * -« M 

ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Kentucky 4t-52c ■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■ ■■■U -•■■■■■■■ 



g THE LOAN. 

i 




£ 



trlRST(-EDEI?AL 

Savinqs ctLoan Association 

OF COVINGTON 
5th & Main Streets — Covington, Ky. 



s 

■ 
■ 

\ 

■ 

S 



EI SERE, KY. 
S71S Dixie Highway 



LATONIA, KY. 
36th & Decwney Ate. 



BOB & DENNY'S AUTO BODY 

5824 MADISON PIKE NICHOLSON, KY. 

Phone 356-2346 

—INSURANCE WORK— 

Free Estimates and Free Pickup and Delivery 

COMPLETE BODY Cr PAINT WORK 



Bo Co & Do 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 






WANTED 



Tenant for 200-acre farm, large tobacco base, beef 
cattle program. Must have tools. Good opportunity 

for responsible person. 

.* 

CALL 331-3505 AFTER 6:00 P. M. 
or write 

WILLIAM MIDDENDORF 

1941 PROVINCIAL LANE COVINGTON, KY. 



PUBLIC 
AUCTION 




FIVE SCHOOL BUILDINGS; 
11.48 ALMS UNO 

The Owen County Board of Education Will Sell at 
Public Auction the Following Real Estate & Property: 



Long Ridge School 

JANUARY 23 — 10:30 A. M. 

Four-room building, one basement room, city water, oil furnace. Located 
on a 2-acre site, approximately 4 miles North of Owenton, on U. S. 
Highway 227. 

Pleasant Home School 

JANUARY 23 — 1 :00 P. M. 

Four-room building, one basement room, oil furnace. Located on a 2-acre 
site approximately 7 miles West of Owenton, on Ky. Highway 22. 

Bethany School 

JANUARY 30 — 10:30 A. M. 

Two buildings, 12 rooms, large gymnasium, indoor plumbing and toilet 
facilities. L ocated on a 3.44-acre site approximately 12 miles Sooth of 
Owenton, on U. S. Highway 227. 

Monterey School 

JANUARY 30 — 1:30 P. M. 

Five-room building, oil furnace. Located on 1.75-acre site near Monterey 
on U. S. Highway 127. 

New Liberty School 

FEBRUARY 13 — 1:30 P. M. 

Eight-room building, large gymnasium, dty water, oil furnace. Located 
on a 2.29-acre rite in New Liberty on U. S. Highway 227. 

\ * * * 

All plumbing and electrical fixtures attached to above property wul be 
sold with buildings. Several items of furniture and kitchen equipment 
will be sold at each building. 

TERMS — Real estate, 20% down, balance upon delivery of deed. 

Furniture and equipment, cash. 

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 

OWEN COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION 

PAUL NOEL— AUCTIONEER 



.\J 



Thursday, January 21, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



-DEATHS- 

MKS ANNIE B. WHALEY 

Road, Morning View, died Tuesday 

Miss Annie B. Whaley, 80, Paxton 
night, January 12, at her home. 

Surviving her is a niece, Mrs. Chris- 
tine Tucker of Cincinnati. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
last Friday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
funeral Home, Walton. Burial was 
in Wilmington Cemetery, Fiskburg. 

JAMES A. BAKER 

James A. Baker, 56, of 484 Walnut 
Drive, Latonia Lakes, died Monday, 
Jan. 11, at his home of a self-inflicted 
gunshot wound. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Grace Yarden Baker; a son, James H. 
Baker of Altadena, Calif.; a brother, 



John V. Baker of Fiskburg, and three 
sisters, Mrs. Ruth Hicks of Atwood, 
Mrs. Frances Guffey and Mrs. Be- 
atrice Guffey, both of Covington. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
last Thursday at the Swindler Funeral 
Home, Independence. Burial was in 
the Independence Cemetery. 

GOEBEL BRASHEAR 

Goebel Brashear, 70, of Napoleon 
Road, Warsaw, died early Sunday, 
Jan. 10, at his home. He was a re- 
tired farmer, and a member of the 
Ten Mile Baptist Church, Glencoe. 

Survivors include three daughters, 
Mrs. Helen Speagle of Verona, Mrs. 
Lois Webster of Covington, and Mrs. 
Nancy Plunkett of Elliston; a son, 
Lonnie Brashear of Warsaw; two 
sisters, Mrs. Juanita Skirvin and Miss 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
January 27th and February 10 & 24. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County— George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County— Donald Conrad 824-6551 

Campbell County — Bruce Trapp _635-5129 

Kenton County— George Bach 356-6278 



Orbit Outlet Store 

CRITTENDEN, KENtUCKY HIGHWAY 1548 

1/2 Mile West of the 1-75 Exit 



3-Piece Weekend Slack Suit, regular $23.99 
value .:„ Now $14.99 & $16.99 

Six Dozen New Pantsuits, ladies' sizes 8 to 18, 
and women's extra large sizes. 

Girl's Pantsuits by Orbit, size 7 to 14„: $7.99 

New Shipment of Long Sleeve Blouses. 



20% OFF ON ALL WINTER COATS 
20% OFF ON ALL DRESSES 



Panty Hose .. 
Ski Sweaters 



99c 



Now $8.99 



NOTICE — Store Hours, Monday thru Saturday, 
9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



CARLISLE'S ?«?/?KIDS 



PUT CHILLY WEATHER 1 

OKI THE RUN ■ 
FOR 8EIN6 HALF-COLD 



A» 



S« 



Chase the chills away. Pat oar 
fuel oil in your took and count 
on being warm in the coldest 
weather. Phone NOWl 



-O 



Wf] 



■C3= 



C LOCAL TRADEMARK* ] 




Mary Brashear, both of Warsaw; four 
brothers, H. N., Ervin, Roy and Rob- 
ert Brashear, all of Warsaw; 12 grand- 
children, and five great-grandchildren. 
Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Wednesday, Jan. 13 at the Han.ilton 
Funeral Home, Verona. 

WILLIAM THOMAS COX 

William Thomas Cox, 79, rather of 
Mrs. George Mullins of Bracht-Piner 
Road, died at his home in Dal ton, 
Ga., following a sudden heart seizure. 
He was a retired employee of Ameri- 
can Thread Co., where he worked for 
33 years, and a World War I vet- 
eran. He was a member of Pleasant 
Hill Baptist Church. 

Survivors are his wife, Monie M. 
Christian Cox; two sons, Willard Cox 
of Dalton, Ga., and Jay Cox of Olym- 
pia, Wash.; four daughters, Mrs. 
George (Elnora) Mullins of Bracht- 
Piner Road, Crittenden, Mrs. Leon- 



COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
Vi ACRE 




JOE CLAXON 

In September, 1969, the USDA, 
while it still had the authority, mann- 
ed four general patterns of use for 
DDT. 

(1) All uses on aquatic areas, marsh- 
es, wetlands and adjacent areas; (2) 
All uses on tobacco; (3) All uses on 
shade trees, and (4) All uses in or 
around the home. 

DDT products labelled for the a- 
bove uses that were in channels of 
trade at the time the ban was an- 
nounced could be sold and used leg- 
ally untfl the supply was gone. Also 
uses 1 and 4 control of disease vec- 
tors as determined by Public Health 
officials can still be used as far as 
Federal law applies. 

The 1970 Kentucky General As- 
sembly amended the Kentucky Eco- 
nomic Poison Law, which further 
limits the use of DDT. The amend- 
ment states in part that no person or 
unit of government shall use DDT in 
this Commonwealth except for the 
following purposes: control of house- 
hold pests, control of subterranean ter- 
mites, control of bats, control of rats 
and mice, and any other use for 
which the director finds there is no 
$afe substitute. 

The State Law and the Federal 
Law conflict in some aspects, but the 
safest procedure for you is to not use 
DDT if either law prohibits the use 
pattern in question. Although Ken- 
tucky Law would allow the use of 
DDT in the home, Federal Law does 
not, unless Public Health Officials 
determine it necessary to control di- 
sease bearing insects. DDT for use 
on many crops and animals is still 
registered at the Federal level, but is 
banned at the State level, unless )he 
director finds there is no SAFE sub- 
stitution. The director could not 
authorize the use of DDT on a par- 
ticular crop because of economic hard- 
ship on the growers. 

Particular attention should be given 
to clarifying the DDT situation in re- 
lation to tobacco. In the 1970 season 
the use of DDT was banned on to- 
bacco, but DDT products labelled for 
use on tobacco and in channels of 
trade could be used legally. However, 
growers would not be eligible for price 
support on their crop if they used 
DDT on their field tobacco. A few 
growers may have taken the option 
to use DDT on tobacco in the field 
and forget about price support. In 
the 1971 season growers will not have 
this option. DDT is banned on to- 
bacco by both State and Federal laws 
and cannot be used on tobacco in the 
held or in the bed, regardless of your 
having DDT on hand. 



STOP PUSSYFOOTING AROUND 
PUT YOUR MONEY WHERE YOU 
GET MORE FOR IT . . . SAFELY! 

Don't meow about the earnings from 
from your money . . . purr! Deposit your 
savings at General, where we pay dividends 
at high rates and your money is insured ±jp 
to $20,000. Come in and talk to us about 
Savings Accounts or Savings Cerificates. 



the first In Kentucky 

GENERAL 
SAVINGS 

the general savings and loan association, inc. 

6th St Madison, Covington, Ky. • 291-7219 4501 Dixie Highway, Elsmere, Ky. - 341-4848 






ard (Kathryn) Sneed of Houston, 
Texas, Mrs. Richard (Juanita) Lusk of 
Toms River* N. J., and Mrs. Derryl 
(Tullah) Smith of Dalton, Ga.; and 
15 grandchildren. 

Services were held Saturday, Jan. 16 
at 11:00 a. m., at Love Funeral Home 
in Dalton, with interment in Pleasant 
Hill Cemetery. 

HERBERT ATHEY 

Herbert Athey, 74, of 739 Cox 
Road, Independence, died last Satur- 
day morning in Booth Hospital, Cov- 
ington. 

He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. 
Mabel Points of Covington, and Mrs. 
Ada Alexander of Independence. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Tuesday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Independence. Burial 
was in Mt. Zion Cemetery, Grant 
County. 

W. T. WEBSTER 

W. T. (Bill Dock) Webster, 78, of 
Elliston, in Grant County, died last 
Thursday at the State TB Hospital in 
Paris, Ky., where he had been three 
weeks. He was a retired farmer. 

Survivors .include a son, Hubert 



Webster of Cincinnati; three half- 
sisters, Mrs. Ella Gullion and Mrs. 
Lena Kite of Walton, and Mrs. Lela 
Plunkett of Verona, and two half- 
brothers, Elzie and Everett Webster 
of Elliston. 

Services were held at. 2:30 p. m., 
Sunday at the Pleasant View Baptist 
Church, Grant County. Hamilton Fu- 
neral Home, Verona, had charge of 
arrangements. 

One of man's greatest enemies is 
the 'illusion that there will be more 
time tomorrow than there is today. 




Ambitious Andrew who 
Desired part-time work 
Advertised in classified 
Now Andrew is a clerk 



Lunsford Trucking-Blackfopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO URGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 



MORNING VIEW, KY. 



356-7527 - 359-4667 




Hen* one ifcft !au*A fa©* jpfca* 



Pork Roast 



BONELESS 
Rolled & Tied 



lb. 



59c 



Callies 



SMOKED - TENDERIZED 
Medium Size 



LB. 



43c 



Pork Sausage 



COUNTRY STYLE 
Made In Store 
LB. 



49c 



SPICED APPLE RINGS, White Villa 



15-oz. size 35c 



UNPEELED APRICOTS, While Villa 16-oz. size 29c 



Dish Washing Liquid 



DEBBIE 

Pull Quart 

32 Fluid Ounces 



29c 



GRAPEFRUIT SEGMENTS, While Villa 15-oi. she 27c 



Grapefruit Juice 



WHITE VILLA 
Sweet or Unsweet 
Large 46-Oz. Size 



45c 



CUT ALL GREEN ASPARAGUS, White Villa... 14%-oz. size 29c 

APPLE BUTTER, White Villa 28-oz. size 33c 



Peanut Butter 



WHITE VILLA 

Large 2Vi-Lb. 

Cookie Jar 



99c 



PATRICIAN FACIAL TISSUES 200 19c 



Apples 



Produce Department 

4-Lb. Size 
CELLO BAG 



49c 



FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OF $3.00 OR MORE 



Model 




Store 



FREE Delivery Every Morning— Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 
Two Deliveries On Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 6:00 p. m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 8:00 p. m., Friday and Saturday 



Phone 485-4991 



Walton, Kentucky 



j 





s 




J 

A 
N 








> *> 



\ 





TRYING FOR 100 YEARS 



A Modemly-Equipped Weekly Newspaper — letter Pre$s and Offset Printing Phone: 485-4962 
Serving A Progressive Community— Boone, Kenton, Grant &■ Gallatin Counties 10c Copy 



Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 4 



January Meeting of 
Boone County DAR 

The Januay meeting of the Boone 
County Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution was held at the 
home of Mrs. Carl Anderson and her 
daughter, Mrs. William Long with 
Mesdames Francis J. Sayre, Richard 
Doming and C. William Funk as co- 
hostesses. 

The meeting was chaired hy Mrs. 
Francis Sayre, Regent. The Chaplain, 
Mrs. William Conrad presented a 
poem entitled "The New Year." 

Mrs. Howard Jarrell reported that 
the following schools in Boone County 
had submitted essays on American 
History; Conner Jr. High, Ockerman 
and Immaculate Heart of Mary. The 
winners were Judy Jacobs, John H. 
Helmle, Richard Rose and Debbie 
Harti all of Immaculate Heart of 

The 80th Continental of DAR will 
be held at Washington, D C. on 
April 19-23. Mrs. Sayre and Mrs.Joe 
Eubanks plan to attend. 

New members whose papers have 
been accepted in Washington are 
Mesdames George Schiffer, Donald 
Coleman, Kenneth Glahn, Jesse Shack- 
elford, Henry Dye and Miss Donna 
Sayre. 

Mrs. Helen Collins, National De- 
fense Chairman, spoke on "Sex Edu- 
cation In Our Schools," as taken from 
the National Defender magazine. It 
was the consensus of opinion that sex 
education should be taught by par- 
ents in the home atmosphere. 

The State Board of Management of 
the Kentucky Society, DAR, was held 
on Saturday, January 9, at Ramada 
Inn, Lexington. Those attending from 
- the chapter were: Mrs. Francis Sayre, 
Mrs. Roy Nestor, Mrs. Clifford Coyle, 
and Mrs. Davis Gaines. 

In the absence of the announced 
speaker, who was unable to be pres- 
ent due to illness m the family, Mrs. 
Sayre spoke on the same subject, 
"Drug Addiction and It's Abuses." 
She said, "We do not realize how 
many people are on drugs." 

Attending were: Mesdames William 
Conrad, Walter Ferguson, Helen Col- 
lins, Florence Brothers, Davis Gaines, 
Caroll Conrad, Clifford Coyle, Joseph 
Eubanks, Howard Jarrell, Ashlin Lo- 
gan, Samuel Denham, Jr., Henry Dye, 
Floyd Roberts, Francis Sayre, Bernard 
Scott, Richard Doming, Jesse Shackel- 
ford, Roy Nestor, Carl Anderson, Wil- 
liam Long, and Miss Margaret Good- 
ridge. V^ 

Community Service 



At Christian Church 

The Walton Christian Church was 

host to a community Christian Unity 

service on Sunday evening. The theme 

' was, "Fellowship of the Holy Spirit." 

A large attendance was on hand. 

The special guest speaker of the 
evening was Dr. Frank Steeley, presi- 
dent of Northern Kentucky State Col- 
lege. His message on community unity 
was well received. 

Participating in the serviee were the 
following local pastors: Arthur Russell, 
Wilford Davis, Robert Yates, Harry 
Tenhundfeld, Jerry Ennis, and Larry 
Cook. 

Special music was furnished by the 
host church choir. 

The offering amounted to $152.32, 
and will be used by the Walton Min- 
isterial group to aid persons in ex- 
treme need. 

A buffet dinner was served prior to 
the service by Rev. and Mrs. Russell 
to the visiting ministers and Dr. 
Steeley. 

Horse Health and Nutrition 

A Hone Health and Nutrition Clin- 
ic for 4-H members and leaders was 
held January 17 at the Burlington 
School. 

About 75 members and leaders at- 
tended the clinic at which a film on 
internal parasites was shown. A dis- 
cussion folllowed the film during which 
members asked questions concerning 
the preventive measures they could 
use to protect their horses. 

Copies of a specially prepared 
booklet, passed out at the meeting, 
outlining specific diseases and nutri- 
tional requirements may be picked; up 
at the Boone County Extension Office 
in Burlington. 

, w 

Housewife: It's tough when you 
have to pay over a dollar a pound 
for meat. Butcher: Yeah, but it's a 
lot tougher when you pay only 69c 
a pound for itl 



Boone County DAR To 
Meet at Heritage House 

The February meeting of the Boone 
County Chapter, DAR, will be held 
at Heritage House, Florence, with 
Mesdames Wallace K. Grubbs, Reu- 
ben Conner, Deane Poore, Robert 
Woodward, and Joseph Eubanks as 
co-hostesses. 

The guest speaker will be George 
Toadvine, Principal of Boone County 
High School, whose subject will be, 
"Spanish Influence on American His- 
tory." Mr. Toadvine majored in His- 
tory and Spanish, and received his 
MA degree from the University of 
Cincinnati. He spent five years at a 
Methodist Mission School in Bolivia. 

JUNIOR CLASS HAM 
DINNER, FEBRUARY 5 

The junior class of Walton-Verona 
High School will have a ham dinner 
Friday, February 5, starting at 5:30 
p. m. The menu 'will consist of ham, . 
sweet potatoes, green beans, salad, and 
dessert. Tickets are on sale from any 
member of the class. Adults, $1.15, 
and children, 65 cents. At the door, 
the cost will be $1.25 for adults, and 
75 cents for children. 

The juniors invite you to be pres- 
ent and enjoy a good dinner. 

APPOINTED MANAGER 

Gregory K. Maples has been ap- 
pointed district manager of Metropoli- 
tan Life Insurance Company's Coving- 
ton office at 1552 Madison Avenue. 

Mr. Maples succeeds Robert W. 
Eubanks, who is on disability. 

The district serves Bromley, Bur- 
lington, Erlanger, Florence, Hebron, 
Independence, Petersburg, Union, 
Walton, and many other important 
centers, as well as Covington. 

Home Entered Recently 

An intruder or intruders entered 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew 
Penn on Needmore St., Walton, on 
Sunday evening, - January 17, while 
they were attending church. 

A radio and a small amount of 
money was taken. Several chest draw- 
ers were emptied as someone appar- 
ently was looking for currency. 

Entrance was made by breaking 
through a side door. 

Combs' County Chairman 

Robert Matthews, State Campaign 
Chairman for Bert Combs and Julian 
Carroll, has announced that Asa M. 
Rouse would serve as Boone County 
Chairman for Combs-Carroll. 

Combs seeks the Democratic nom- 
ination for Governor in the May Pri- 
mary and Carroll is seeking nomination 
as Lieutenant Governor. 

Rouse, a Walton attorney, is a past 
President of the Boone County Bar 
Association, Trial Commissioner for 
Boone County, and a member of the 
Executive Committee of William 
Booth Memorial Hospital. 



Church League 



Bearcats Win Two 
And Pioneers One 

Walton-Verona 55, Brossart 44 

Walton- Verona won its third game, 
in four Northern Kentucky Independ- 
ent Athletic Conference games by de-, 
feating Bishop Brossart, 55-44, Tues- 
day of last week, at Alexandria. 

The Bearcats settled the outcome in 
the third period by doubling the score, 
on the home team. Brossart was los- 
ing in the conference for the seventh 
time in 11 games. 

Mike Ferguson had 16 points and' 
Ron Huffman 12 for the winners. Rog- 
er Bruener scored 18 for the losers. 

The reserve game was won by the 
Walton-Verona boys, 47-39. 

Simon Kenton 66, Conner 55 

Simon Kenton ran its winning 
streak to three games by defeating 
(SShner High School, 66-55, last Fri- 
day' night at Boone Couonty. 

It was the fourth NKAC victory f&r 
the Pioneers and their sixth in 13 
games this season. 

After a tied first quarter, Simon 
Kenton got the winning margin with 
a 29-point total in the second period. 

Greg Haldermna led the winners 
with 15 points, while Leistner had IT, 
and Davis 11. Carlton Hempfling 
topped Conner with 24 markers, and 
Fields added 10. 

Conner won the reserve game by a 
50-41 score. 

Walton-Verona won its third game 
in the NKIAC and its 13th of the 
season with a 76-62 victory over the 
Augusta team, last Friday. 

Walton never trailed and a 12-point 
advantage in the third period put the 
game out of reach of the home team- 
Mike Ferguson had 20 points fflf 
the winners, while Bob Messmer adcE 
ed 18, Sargent rH, and Ingram 11. 
Vaughn Kclsch had 24 for the losers, 
S. Kelsch added 12, as did Baker. 

WHERE THERE'S SMOKE— 

. . . large billows of black smoke 
pour into the sky . . . must be a large 
building on fire. This idea must have 
been shared by many residents of Wal- 
ton last Friday afternoon, shortly after 
two o'clock. 

It turned out that the origin of the 
smoke was at the Northern Kentucky 
Sanitation landfill, located off Beaver 
Road. Contents of several large bar- 
rels of flamable liquid were burning. 

The Walton Vols responded to the' 
scene and helped extinguish the blaze. 
No apparent injury or damage result- 
ed. 

Oak Island Homemakers 

The Oak Island Homemakers will 
meet Monday, February 1 at 1:00 p. 
m., in the home of Miss Elma Tay- 
lor, 18 Sidney Drive, Independence. 

The program, "Annual Flowers," is 
to be presented by Mary Jackson and 
Miss Taylor. 



Low Teacher Status j? 
Is A Disappointment 

A, national poll conducted for the 
White House Conference on Children 
and Youth, by Gilbert Youth Re- 
search, shows only 3 percent of 500 
children — 10 to 12 years old — rated a 
teacher as the person "most admired." 
Friends in the children's peer group 
rated highest with 33 percent. Par- 
ents were next "most admised," with 
12 percent. 

If the poll is valid, it reflects a 
sharp drop in status of the teacher by 
children. The results of the poll may 
also indicate the need for a good pub- 
lic relations program by all school 
personnel. 



Local Students On 
Dean's List at EKU 

Twelve students from Boone county 
have been named to the dean's list at 
Eastern Kentucky University for the 
fall semester. 

To attain the list, a student must 
make a scholastic average of 3.5 or 
better for 14 hours or more. 

The list includes Dianne M. Reh- 
kamp, Kerry L. Courtney, Richard L. 
Deglow, Carol J. Moore, Sandra S. 
Osborne, Charlotte R. Smoot and 
James P. Woods, Florence; George 
W. Haley and Deborah Hempel of 
Walton; Marilyn J. Scroggin, of Bur- 
lington; Timothy L. Stanford, Dark 
J. Vogelsang of Hebron. 

"John," said Mrs. Spenders, "I've 
got lots of things I want to talk to 
you about." "Glad to hear it," her 
husband snapped, "usually you want to 
talk to me about lots of things you 
HAVEN'T got." 

Boone Planners Okay 
Landfill Near Walton 

The Boone County Planning Com- 
mission approved a special use per- 
mit for the Bavarian Trucking Co. to 
operate a sanitary landfill on the 
North side of 1-71 at the end of Mc- 
Coy's Fork Road, near Walton, re- 
cently. 

Conditions attached to the permit 
specify that the landfill must be cover- 
ed daily and no burning be allowed, 
that no harmful industrial waste will 
be disposed there, and that the com- 
pany allow the planning commission 
to inspect the site. 

Local Board Members 
Attend Louisville Meet 

All board members of the Walton- 
Verona schools attended the orienta- 
tion conference in Louisville, Sunday 
jiight, January 17. The purpose of 
this meeting was to acquaint new 
board members with their duties in 
the management and operation of the 
Kentucky public schools. 

Approximately 170 new board of 
education members will take office 
this month as a result of November's 
election. 



Walton-Verona 
PTA Meet Held 

The Walton-Verona PTA met on 
Monday evening at the high school 
with only a small attendance. 

The vice-president, Mrs. Robert 
Eisenschmidt, presided in the absence 
of Mrs. Edward Lay, who was ill. The 
devotional chairman, John Johnson, 
gave the scripture from Psalms 100. 

The program wa under the direction 
of Mrs. James Stephenson and was on 
drugs and their misuse. Six students 
related information that had been re- 
ceived during attendance at various 
meetings. 

Donna Coyle, Thurman Thorpe, 
Peggy Garrison and Dean Ward told 
of their trip to the Governor's Work- 
shop, held in Louisville, in December. 
They told how that although there 
are many legal uses of several drugs, 
there h a s been an increase in recent 
years to abuse several types of drugs. 
They told what symptoms to look for 
in detecting persons who are using 
some form of drag illegally. Penalties 
in some of the various categories were 
also discussed. 

Beverly Bonar told several facts of 
a visit she made to the Clinical Re- 
search Center near Lexington. This 
hospital is used in the treatment of 
drug addicts from across the U. S. 
and rehabilitation of these persons as 
they find a place again in society. 

Debbie Boyers attended a workshop 
at Thomas More College early this 
year. Many state officials as well as 
business people and youth, led in this 
meeting as the drug problem was pre- 
sented by film and group discussion. 
This presentation was capably present 
ed by the students. 

Principal Billy Prewitt thanked the 
students for a nice program and said 
that the teachers will talk on drug 
misuse during an in-service day on 
February 12. 

It was announced that ETV on 
channels 52 and 54 will begin a series 
of programs on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days dealing with the help available 
in this nationwide drag problem. 

During the business sessiop, Mrs. 
Don McMillian gave the secretary's 
and treasurer's reports. The room 
count was won by Mrs. James Layne's 
fifth grade room. Emest Hahn re- 
ported that the new copying machine 
is expected soon. It will be used by. 
the elementary grades at Verona. 

The February meeting will be a 
Founders' Day program. Plan now to 
attend and support the PTA. 

January Meeting of 
The Wa-Na Club 

The Wa-Na Woman's Club met 
on Thursday, January 7, at the Wal- 
ton Christian Church. 

The Spiritual Guidance was given 
by Mrs. Chestesr Cl —;son. The pro- 
gram was presented by Mrs. Jack 
Rouse, "To Market, To Market," by 
the Sperry Hutchinson Company. 



Basketball Results 

In the first game Saturday night, 
St. Patrick was short-manned and had 
to forfeit to St. Cecilia. 

In the secod game, it took two 
overtimes for Hickory Grove to de- 
feat the Methodists, 108-99. Bolen 
led the winners with 33 points and 
Mastin added 25. G. J. Poore was 
high for th© losers with 36. 

In the third game, Walton Baptist 
had little trouble in defeating New 
Bethel, 120-82. Ron Brown led the 
victors with 36 points, while Collins 
and Bill Gamble added 24 and 23, re- 
spectively. Rich led New Bethel with 
26, and Chipman added 23. 

In the tlast game, Piner defeated 
the Church of Christ, 80-73. Cor- 
nelius led Piner with 25 points and 
Matteoli added 24. Lockard led the 
losers with 19. 

This weekend, in the first game at 
5:30, Hickory Grove goes against Wal- 
ton Christian; at 6:45, the Church of 
Christ plays the Methodists; at 8:00, 
Walton Baptist tangles with Piner, 
and in the finale at 9:15, St. Cecilia 
plays Richwood. 

Speaks At PTA Meeting 

Miss Marilyn Murphy, probation of- 
ficer with the Kenton County Court, 
spoke about "The Neglected Child" 
at the January 12 meeting of the 9th 
District School PTA, Covington. 

She discussed the work of Hope 
Cottage and told of the need for a 
similar facility for pre-school children. 



STONE CAVERN HARD TO EXPLAIN 




Geologists have many theories about the reasons for the 
unusual forms of the stalactites (growing down from the ceiling) 
and stalagmites (growing up from the ground) in America's 
famed Luray Caverns in Virginia, but few of the scientists agree 
on any one theory. It is known that the Caverns are ten to 12 
million years old, and that parts of it are still growing at the. rate 
of one cubic inch of cave onyx every 120 years. The largest 
room is 300' x 500', and ceilings range up to 140' in height. 



Delicious refreshments were served 
by the hostesses, Mrs. Sonny Popham 
and Mrs. Fay Norris, to the following 
members and guests: Mrs. Evelyn 
Hance, Mrs. Dortha Black, Mrs. Helen 
Ruth McElroy, Mrs. Margaret Elliott, 
Mrs. Pat Art, Mrs. Mary Stephens, 
Mrs. Thelma Sturgeon, Mrs. Evelyn 
Rouse, Mrs. Libby Rouse, and Mrs. 
Pauline Flynn. 

Some of the members attended the 
Mid-Winter Boad Meeting at the 
President Motor Inn, January 26. 

Florence Gets Police Grant 

Governor Louis B. Nunn recently 
awarded a $600 grant to Florence for 
police equipment. Mayor Carroll M. 
Ewing was notified of the award in a 
letter from Governor Nunn. 

In the letter, the governor said, 
"Effective crime prevention and con- 
trol is a concern of every citizen and 
a major responsibility of elected of- 
ficials. With this grant award, I trust 
we have taken a constructive step 
toward fulfilling that responsibility." 

Grant recipients are required to 
match the awards — usually on a 60 per 
cent federal, 40 per cent local ratio. 
i . i i i • ' 

Bell Program Cancelled 

The ad that appears in this issue 
of the Advertiser for Cincinnati Bell, 
"The Sites and Sound of Music," has 
been cancelled until March 28. 

Sorry, but we did not receive the 
word of the cancellation until the ad 
had already been printed. But, re- 
member the program will be aired on 
March 28. 




T. O. Ballard— 10 years ago 

Next Monday, February 1, T. O. 
Ballard will celebrate his 94th birth- 
day. A retired barber, after 67 years, 
Mr. Ballard resides at 20 North Main 
Street, Walton, next door to Ryan 
Hardware. 

When he retired, Mr. Ballard said 
that he would like to live to be 100 
years old, and each birthday brings 
him one step closer to this dream. 

A widower since 1949, he keeps 
active by doing his own housework, 
cooking and running errands. 

He does some reading in the daily 
papers and of course gets the Walton 
news from the Advertiser. He has 
been a subscriber for many years — 
ever since Roy Stamler and Jim Wal- 
lace ran the Advertiser in a little shop 
across the street from his home — in 
a part of the Walton Garage. 

"Butch" attends services regularly 
at All Saints Church, where he is a 
member. 

T. O. expects to have dinner with 
relatives on Sunday. 

Girl Scout Cookie Time 

The words, "Hello, I'm from the 
Licking Valley Girl Scout Council- 
would you like to place your cookie 
order with me?" will be heard from 
January 29 through February 7, as the 
"Girls in Green "launch their annual 
cookie sale. 

Since 1912 Girl Scouting has of- 
fered girls a chance to grow; to be- 
come more aware of the world around 
them and of their place in that world. 

Buy some cookies from the girlsl 

NFO President Gives 
Prospects For 1971 

Oren L. Staley, President of the 
National Farmers Organization, has 
declared that the "hog lift" demon- 
stration by NFO hog producers on the 
East coast early in January was only 
a sample of things to come. 

The farm leader from Rea, Mo., 
stated that "The winter of 1971 will 
go down in history as the farmers'" 
winter of discontent and action." 

Staley said, "More American farm' 
ers than ever before are realizing that 
NFO is their only hope. Farmers' 
backs are against the wall and the 
only way out of agriculture's economic 
crisis is through NFO collective bar- 
gaining programs that get down to 
the nitty-gritty of raising farm prices." 

The leader added, "Farmers must 
fight the monstrous food chains that 
have built monopolistic power that 
permits them, in effect, to dictate 15c 
hogs to the farmer while at the same 
time dictating $1.00 pork chops to 
the housewife. Farmers must no long- 
-er — to l er at e - ferlow farmers being 
squeezed out while wondering how 
long before it's their him to be pushed 
out of their homes and way of life 
into overcrowded cities because they 
cannot as individuals receive justice 
at the marketplace." 

Staley then declared, "Farmers are 
ready to back up their remands by 
blocking production together and put- 
ting a price tag on it so they will be- 
come price-makers instead of price- 
takers. NFO will lead the fight and 
buyers who see the handwriting on 
the wall won't be caught without 
NFO contracts that will be filled by 
progressive farmers who are determin- 
ed to price their products." 

The NFO president concluded the 
challenge to those who buy from 
farmers, saying, "We are demanding 
economic justice for farmers and NFO 
is going to see the battle through?*' — 

Literary Club to Meet 

The Walton Literary Club will 
meet February 3, at 2:00 p. m., in 
the Walton Christian Church. 

Hostesses will be Mrs. John Farrell, 
Mrs. Sam Sleet, Miss Virginia Beverly 
and Miss Kathryn Scott. 

Mrs. Charles Allphin will be the 
speaker. Her topic on "High Points 
of International Affairs," is expected 
to be quite interesting. 

"When I went to school, I walked 
five miles a day," father said to his 
. bearded son home from college "for the 
summer. "Wow," replied Sonny, "it 
must have been some PROTEST 
march!" 

x> 



^ 



Thursday, January 28, 1971 



WALTON ADVERTISER 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



t-j r* 



(Established In 1914) 



Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 - Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 
— Assistant Editor 
Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year- In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch. Foreign Rate, 6c Per Line. 




Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Wallace enter- 
tained Mr. and Mrs. Claude Wallace, 
Sunday at White Horse. It was the 
fifth wedding anniversary of Mr. and 
Mrs. Claude Wallace. They spent 
the afternoon sightseeing. 

Travis Ennis, son of Rev. and Mrs. 
Jerry Ennis, is recovering from a 
virus infection. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Burgess and 
son, Timmy, attended the stage play 
with Buddy Ebsen at the Shubert 
Treatre, Saturday night. 

Mrs. Lucfle B. Hudson has return- 
ed to her home here after having 
been confined in Booth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carlisle en- 
tertained Saturday evening in honor 
of the birthday of their son, Guy Car- 
lisle. Also present were Mrs. Guy 
Carlisle and daughters, Christy and 
Connie. 

Miss Susan Jarman, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Andy Jarman, is at- 
tending the University of Kentucky,^ 
Lexington. 

Mrs. Melvin Utley, Mrs. Harold 
Hann, Mrs. Emma Cheesman were 
Sunday evening guests of Edith Ham- 
ilton and Mary Stephenson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Mike Holder 
have moved to Lexington. 

Sympathy is extended to the Rich 
family in the passing of their father, 
John Rich, Verona. 

Mr. and Ms. Lawrence Wilson and 
Mr. and Mrs. William Rorer were 
the Saturday dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Pat King and son, Todd, of 
Cynthiana. 

Mrs. Richard Huff spent Saturday 
with her mother, Mrs. Goldie Wood, 
and Tommy Black. 

Ricky Ryan, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Cliff Ryan, is recovering from an ap- 
pendectomy. 

Donald Stephenson has returned 
home from the hospital and is getting 
along nicely, it is reported. 

Mrs. W. E. Duchemin spent Tues- 
day with her daughter, Mrs. Bill 
Mullins, and family, of Lexington. 



We extend sympathy to Mrs. Janet 
Burns andchfldren in the loss of her 
husband, Claude Bums. 

The Eastern Star held its regular 
meeting Monday evening with Mrs. 
* Ruth Glenn and Mrs. Pearl Curtis as 
hostesses. Mrs. Margaret Fields act- 
as as Worthy Matron and had charge 
of the business session. Several mem- 
bers enjoyed the refreshments. 

Mrs. Guy St. Clair has returned to 
her home here after having undergone 
eye surgery at St. Elzabeth Hospital. 

Mrs. William Brown is home from 
the hospital after having surgery. | 

Mrs. Ruth Glenn and daughter, 
Peggy, were Sunday guests of her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Glacken, of 
Crittenden. 

Mrs. Edith Scott is visiting in 
Florida. - 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Miller of 
Taylor Mill, were Saturday evening 
dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. John 
' Gault. 

Mrs. Stanley Bush has returned to 
her home and is doing nicely. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kern of Er- 
langer, and Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Os- 
born of Cincinnati, were the Sunday 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley-Bush. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Burgess, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lawrence Lemons, Mrs. 
Malcolm Simpson, and Mr. and Mrs. 
James W. Spencer and son Neil, and 
Mrs. Francis Stephens attended the 
Golden Wedding anniversary of Mr. 
and Mrs. George Shelton of Owenton 
Sunday afternoon. 

Miss Jean Chambers is quite ill at 
her home on Chambers Road 

Mrs. Fannie Adams is ill at her 
home on Nicholson Road. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Bonar and 
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Benton have re- 
turned home after a week's vacation in 
Hot Springs, Ark. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Roter of 
Beaver, were Saturday evening dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm F. 
Simpson. Miss Joella Sleet called 
during the evening. 



BUILDING LOTS-4 lots, 75'x]5<y, Lebanon Road, 
city water. Priced right. 

40-ACRE tract; older house and born. 

1814 ACRE tract; no improvements. 

5-ACRE tract, no improvements. 

121/2 ACRES, lays well, LLL Highway. 

30 ACRES-Price $12,750.00. LLL Highway. 



: 




■c\ 



Gayle 

McElroy 

Realty 

33 Alto Vista Drive 

Walton, Kentucky 
Phone: 485-4297 



Mrs. Erma Stopkman of Covington, 
was the guest Wednesday of last week 
of Mr. and Mrs. George Fisher. 

Miss Millie Baker is now employed 
in Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Ed Jones spent last week with 
Mr. and Mrs. Clayton B. Jones and 
daughter, Evelyn, of Hilliard, Ohio. 

Howard McCubbin is a patient in 
St. Elizabeth Hospital with a heart 
condition. 

Mrs. Wesley Burgess, Mrs. Edith 
Hamilton, Mrs. Beverly Burgess and 
Mrs. Mary Stephenson attended the 
Paul Dixon show last Thursday. 

Mrs. George Simpson of Lexington, 
is a patient in Central Baptist Hos- 
pital. Mrs. Simpson is the mother of 
Mrs.. Robert Yates, Walton, who spent 
the weekend with her father. 

The Morning Circle of the Walton 
Christian Church met last Wednesday 
morning at the home of Mrs. Finley 
Jacobs, Jr. Mrs. A. J. Russell gave the 
study and Mrs. David Peebles the 
devotional. Present were: Mesdames 
Morgan Campbell, Robert Eisen- 
schmidt, David Peebles, Gordon Gar- 
rison, Jack Rouse, A. J Russell, and 
the hostess, Mrs. Jacobs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Slusher of 
Verona, gave a surprise birthday party 
Saturday night at their home for Mrs. 
Clayton Jones, of Hilliard, Ohio. The 
other guests included Mr. an ^ Mrs 
.Kerry Vest and daughter, Kim, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Jones and son, Scott, 
Mrs. Ed Jones, Miss Sallie Vest, Mr. 
and Mrs. Hess Vest, and Clayton B. 
Jones. Everyone left wishing Helen 
many more birthdays. 

"Stork Shower" Given 

Mrs. Ronald Keller of North Main 
Street, gave a surprise "stork shower" 
for her sister, Mrs. David Gamble, on 
Sunday afternoon. 

Those who enpoyed the surprise and 
the delicious refreshments were Mes- 
dames Judy Mayes, Carolyn Ashcraft, 
June Jones, Pat Walter, Lana Mul- 
ford, Martha Webster, Carta Gamble, 
Alberta Groger, Ed Crow, Laura De- 
Grummond ,Marie Blizzard, Gilbert 
Groger, Connie Puckett, Enda Groger, 
Virgie Mulhem, Edith Mosby, Martha 
Gamble, and Miss Joella Sleet. 

SCHOOL NEWS . . . 

WALTON-VERONA HIGH 

"A" Honor Roll— 

7th Garde— Jayna Cheesman. 

8th Grade — Lee Ann Scott, S.usan 
Hetterman, Lisa Driskell, Nannette 
Johnson. 

9th Grade — Dayna Cheesman, Lynn 
Kohsin, Sandra Dixon. 

10th Grade — Layna Cheesman and 
Steve Alford. 

12th Grade— Joan O'Donnell, Deb- 
bie Sizemore and Debbie Boyers. 
"B" Honor Roll 

7th Grade— James Dixon, Laura Mc- 
Millian, Valarie Stephenson, Melinda 
-McElroy, Martha Gadd, Paula Beigh- 
le, Rita Berkemeier, Becky Stamper. 

8th Grade— Tina Montoure, Cathy 
Disney, Gwen Milner, Mike Bell, Fan- 
nie Thorpe, Greg Ryan, Danny Ryan, 
Judy Butler. 

9th Grade— Danny Bell, Charlotte 
Disney, Emma Kinman, Alvin Martin, 
Karen Slayback, Mike Stallard, Judy 
Monfort. 

10th Grade— Connie Vest, .Terry 
Strong, Terry Cady, Marilyn Frederick. 

11th Grade— Shirley Adams, Judy 
Brooks, Jeanette Cady, Donna Coyle, 
Bambi Kidwell, Tim McCubbin, Don- 
na Pence, Ricky Rayboume, Mills 
Rouse, Belinda Brown, Ricky Stephen- 
son, Travis Warren, Cathy Poff. 

12th Grade — Darlene Berkemeier, 
Brenda Densler, Mike Ferguson, Judy 
Hetterman, Lois Lay, Cindy McMil- 
lian, Betty Mitts, George Raybourne, 
Darrell Rich, Annette Rouse, Mike 
Rust, Marti Stephens, Hettie Taylor, 
Greg Turner, Sandi Washum, Sherry 
Clifton, Cynthiana Baughn, Ann Wil- 
liams. 



BLUE RIBBON 4-H CLUB 

The January meeting at Mrs. Gib- 
son's had 10 members and 2 leaders 
attending. Pledges and songs were led 
by Mary Jo Eggelston. Brenda Gib- 
son called the meeting to order. Kathy 
Elbert called roll and read the sec- 
retary's report. Brenda Duncan gave 
a treasurer's report and has opened a 
bank account in the club's name. 

Mrs. Gibson thanked all members 
for the charm braclet, a Christmas 
gift, Dates of coming events are Jan- 
uary 19th for Clothing Training and 
January 30th, officers training. 

The club decided on a title and 
picked a committee to work on club 
.act for the March Variety Show.. Lisa 
West, Brenda Gibson and Wilda 
Stephens will plan the speciality acts 
The club act committee members are 
Brenda Gibson, Brenda Duncan, Laura 
West, Kathy Elbert and Wilda Step- 
hens. 

Congrats to two members who won 
county champion on Project Record 
Books, Laura West on Knitting and 
Housekeeping and Lisa West on Horse 
and Pony. 

We have a new member, Diane 
Scherder. The meeting adjourned and 
recreation was led by Wilda Stephens 
and enjoyed by all. Linda West- 
Reporter. 



PINER CLEVER CLOVERS 

The last meeting of the Piner 
Clever Clovers was held in the home 
of Dexter and Rhonda LaFollette, 



with Dexter and Rhonda serving as 
hosts. 

Andrea Ballard, president, called the 
meeting to 'order. Pledges to the flags 
were led by Judy Bray. Two songs 
were sung, "Battle Hymn of (the Re- 
public" and "Grandfather's Clock." 

The roll call was given and the 
members answered with something 
dealing with Valentine Day. 

Members present were Rhonda La- 
Follette, Cherie Smith, Andrea Bal- 
lard, Dexter LaFollette, Debbie Wolfe, 
Kenny Cooke, Betty Cooke, and Judy 
Magee. Three leaders were present: 
Mrs. LaFollette, Mrs. Ballard and Mrs. 
Bray. 



Members made plans for the "Ice 
Follies," and discussed the talent show. 

The next meeting of the club wOfe 
be held at the Firehouse with Judy 
Magee as hostess. — Reporter 



BIRTHS 



Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Gay Best of Independence ,on the 
birth of a daughter who arrived 1 Jan- 
uary 23, at St. Elizabeth Hospital. 
The little one has been named 1 Gay 
Ann. The Bests have a son, Jim. 



TRULY HOMELIKE 

A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 



Independence, Ky. 
356-2673 



—SERVING ALL FAITHS- 




COMPLETE DRUG 

STORE SERVICE! 

Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for Yon — 

Nie's Pharmacy 

ILL Highway between Independence and Nicholson 



STOP PUSSYFOOTING AROUND 
PUT YOUR MONEY WHERE YOU 
GET MORE FOR IT . . . SAFELY! 



Don't meow about the earnings from 
from your money . . . purr! Deposit your 
savings at General, where we pay dividends 
at high rates and your money is insured up 
to $20,000. Come in and talk to us about 
Savings Accounts or Savings Cerificates. 



the first In Kentucky 




GENERAL 
SAVINGS 

the general savings and loan association, inc. 

6th & Madison, Covington, Ky. - 2917219 4501 Dixie Highway, Ebmerc, Ky. • 341-4848 





SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 1971 



10:00 A. M. 



At the farm of Ken Dixon, on Lemon-Northcurt Road, 6 Miles North of Dry Ridge, 
Kentucky, in Grant County. 

Mr. Dixon has decided to quite the dairy business and will sell his entire dairy 
herd, on the above date. Also, 206-acre form. 

46 head of dairy cattle and heifers, which include 31 head of Holstein, Brown Swiss, 
Ayrshire and Guernsey, mainly all Holstein, and 15 head of fine Holstein heifers. 

ONE OF THE BEST DAIRY HERDS IN GRANT COUNTY! The cows range in age 
from 3 to 8 years; 8 open cows, 20 have freshened in the last 3 months, and are 
bred back; rest to freshen soon. One cow gives 60 lbs. per day, 1 gives 56 lbs., 3 
give 52 lbs., 4 give 48 lbs., 4 give 40 lbs., 3 give 36 lbs., 2 give 32 lbs., 2 give 30 lbs., 
1 gives 28 lbs. All TB and Bangs tested. 

Also to be offered at auction — 206-acre farm, .9 mile road frontage on the Lemon- 
Northcurt Road, fenced and cross-fenced into 7 different fields; large tobacco barn, 
also feed and dairy barn with 150-ton silage holder with feeder; a 5-room frame 
home. This farm has 4.8 acres corn base, 1.98 tobacco base, well watered. Here is 
a grazing farm. Also included with the farm is the milking equipment: Bulk tank 
and milkers; also 60 tons good silage. Buy this farm and start shipping milk. 

TERMS: On farm, 10% down day of sale, balance on or before 30 days or with the 
deed; on personal property, cash or check. 

SALE CONDUCTED BY 

COL CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

Realtors & Auctioneers 431-4222 Covington-Williamstown 

AUCTIONEERS COL. CECIL WAYMAN & REL C. WAYMAN 

Gayle McElroy, Realtor, Walton, Ky. - 485-4297 

— ^— — — — i^ "^^— — ^— — ■^—^^— — 



Wotton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



s Thursday, January 28, 197T 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation fir Repair 

Precast Cisterns and 

Backhoe Work. 

356-5804 



20 Years Ago . 



Thursday, January 24, 1951 
WALTON— 

Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Baker, Walton, 
ate the proud parents of a daughter, 
born January 20, at St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital, Covington. The babe weighed 
6 pounds, 14 ounces, and was named 
Mildred Louise. 

Mrs. Charles Hayes and Mrs. Clay- 
ton Jones attended the Mid-Winter 
Board Meeting of the Kentucky Fed- 



eration of Women's Clubs, held recent- 
ly at the Seelback Hotel, Louisville. 
They are members of the Wa-Na 
Woman's Club. 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 Melbourne— 835-2895 

Pre-Ca*t Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pood 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
meats Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 




B.C.&D. 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

r i - 1 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
February 3rd and February 17th. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County— George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County— Donald Conrad____„824-6551 

Campbell County— Bruce Trapp 635-5129 

Kenton County— George Bach.____356-6278 



Homelite Chain Saw Dealer 

Now Open In Independence 

CABER'S SERVICE CENTER 

Repairs Most Makes of Chain Saws & Small Engines 

Hand Saw Sharpening by Machine, Includes Setting 

and Oiling — Reasonable Rates 

—SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY— 

Open Monday thru Friday, 8 a. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 

5253 Madison Pike, Independence, Ky. 



The American Legion Hall in Wal- 
ton, was ransacked recently by van- 
dals. 

Several members of the Wa-Na 
Club gathered at the home of Mrs. 
W. D. Scroggin, near Verona, for a 
surprise stork shower for the club 
president, Mrs. Fred Hamilton. 

The January meeting of ther Wa-Na 
Club was held in the home of Mrs. 
Clayton Jones on North Main Street. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Harry D. 
Mayhugh, Jr., a daughter, named 
Patricia Yvonne. 

Beighle Bros, have purchased the 
grocery on North Main Street, oper- 
ated by Mr. and Mrs. Joe O'Doud. 

Mrs. Floyd Humphrey and daugh- 
ter, Rhonda, and Miss Dorothy Woods 
were shopping in Covington, Saturday, 
and called on Mrs. Orville Collins. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Penn and 
children spent Sunday with his par- 
ents at Hinton. 

INDEPENDENCE— 

J. B. and Hazel Spegal purchased 
one acre on Fiskburg and Gardners- 
ville Road, from Lucy Spegal. 

In the Church League basketball at 
the YMCA, the young men's team 
of the Independence Baptist Church, 
(has played the first round of seven 
games and won them all. 

The Independence Homcmakers 
held their January meeting with Mrs. 
Charles Davis. 

INDEPENDENCE, R-l— 

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Dean and 
daughter were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Vemon Dean.. 

Wayne Wiley and several of the 
other boys of our community are to 
leave February 5 for service. 

Mrs. Caroline Armstrong had as 
guests Sunday, her daughter, Alice, 
and husband of Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Reffettand 
Mrs. E. W. Groves spent Sunday af- 
ternoon with Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
Spaulding. 



KY. FILM RECEIVES AWARD 

The Department of Public Infor- 
mation recently received a citation of 
merit from the Michigan Outdoors 
Writers Assn. on the film "Re-discover 
Kentucky." The 15-minute, 16MM, 
color film shows Kentucky's state parks 
and scenics in fall color, as well as 
recalling the romantic past with viewg 
of Cumberland Gap, Ft. Harrod, "My 
Old Kentucky Home," Shakertown and 
the Lincoln and Davis Memorials. 



ELECTRIC SEWER 
CLEANING 

Ditches dug with new trenching 
machine, 4 to 10 inches wide and 
up to 30 inches deep, only 35c 
per foot. Pre-Cast .concrete cisterns 
installed, and cisterns and septic 
tanks cleaned. 
F. J. LUCAS SANITATION CO. 



356-2315 



<>-«^(H 






Sunday Evening 

Cincinnati Bell Invites You 




ToView 



cc 



Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra's 
Second European Special 

The Sites and Sound of Music" 

of 



Vienna and London 

With Your Hostess, Roberta Peters 

9:00 PM-TV5-Sun. Jan. 31 

Co ^sponsored as a public service by 



© 



Cincinnati Bell 




IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID IN ADVANCE? 



VERONA 

Flonnie Edrington, Reporter 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Risner were 
visiting relatives near Hazard, Ky., the 
past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Robinson and 
family of Hamilton, Ohio, spent last 
Sunday with his brother, Mr. and Mrs. 
Randall Robinson, and children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winfred Swearingin 
and children of Cincinnati, visited her 
mother, Mrs. Allie Chandler, last Sun- 
day. 

We extend our sympathy to the Bill 
Dock Webster family in the passing 
of Mr. Webster last week. We also 
extend our sympathy to the family of 
Mr. Courtney of Glencoe. He was 
the father of Mrs. Joyce Vest of Ve- 
rona. 

Mrs. Allie Chandler received word 
last week her brother, Robert Jones, 
of Erlanger, had been taken to the 
hospital with a heart attcak and was 
in intensive care. We wish him an 
early recovery. 

Miss Colleen Spicer left the hospital 
last week and her arm began to swell 
and they had to take her back to the 
hospital and she has to stay three more 
weeks. We hope to see her home in 
a short time. 

Mike Mclntyre and Miss Debbie 
Spicer were quietly married at New 
Bethel Baptist Church, January 15. 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. Lil- 
lian Stephenson has to go back to the 
hospital as soon as she can get a bed. 
We hope she will soon be well again. 

The WMU women of New Bethel 
Church met at the church Thursday 
afternoon with 10 members present. 
Those attending were Theora Locke, 
Allie Chandler, Flonnie Edrington, 
Alice Smith, Mattie Orr, Phyllis Step- 
"henson, Elizabeth Kemper, Mary 
Porter, Gertrude Brewster, Adeline 
Reed. We had a nice meeting, and 
we wish all members could have been 
present. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Maddox have 
moved from the Dutch Sturgeon house 
here in Verona to Latonia. We hate 
to lose these young folk from our lit- 
tle burg, but wish them the best of 
luck. 



COMPLETE GRINDING & MIXING SERVICE 



We have just installed a new truck hoist system for 
our grinding operation. This eliminates the shoveling 
of corn. Give us a try. 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 



WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 356-2172 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 

Covington - Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
F. H. A. and Mortgages! 



Lunsford Trucking-Blacktopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO LARGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! . 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 

MORNING VIEW, KY. ,356-7527 - 359-4667 



HELP WANTED 



Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to — 

BORON STOP 338 

1-75 b 338 ^ RICHWOOD, KY. 



ABSOLUTE 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1971 



10:00 A. M. 






To settle the estate of the late Earlie and Eula Crouch, located 8 Miles West of Dry Ridge Exit of 1-75 and 
14 Miles East of Owenton, on Taft Highway, Grant County, Ky. Good school system, new hospital, Eagle Creek 
Country Club, and many other forms of recreation add to pleasure of Grant County. 

The heirs and assigns have contracted with us to sell all their real estate and personal o property to the highest 
bidder on date and' place above described. 

INVESTMENT PROPERTY— These following described tracts are in the heart of "Proposed Eagle Creek 
Reservoir." This is your opportunity to purchase before completion of reservoir and before prices go up. 

(1) 67 acres, more or less, known as Crouch's Place. Beautiful Eagle Creek winds through these fertile bot- 
toms adding beauty, recreation, good hunting, fishing, and beauty to wooded areas. This has been "Heaven On 
Earth" to many. Irrigation is no problem here. A six-room home with bath and partial basement; also 4-room 
house (hardwood floors), bam (combination dairy, tobacco and hay), tool shed. • 



(2) 135 acres with ?-bent barn and stripping room, 4-room house (partial basement), all buildings under 
good metal roof; on Taft Highway (No. 22) at Eagle Creek. 

(3) 26 acres, known as Aunt Lois Crosswaite farm; large pond, good line fence; Mt. Pisgah Road (Eagle and 
Stephens Creek). 

(4) Six acres (more or less), Route 22 (Taft), ideal location for business site, home or trailmobile; cistern; 
bus route, mail route, school bus, and within walking distance of church and store. 

The total tobacco allotment is 2.04 acres and 18 acres feed and grain allotment. The individual farm allot- 
ments will be determined by ASC committee. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY — Living room suite (2-piece), one nice bedroom suite (good condition), one older 
bedroom suite, odd beds, dinette set, GE refrigerator, Frigidaire electric stove, gas and wood range, 2 kitchen 
cabinets, Admiral TV (black and white, UHF, good condition)* Siegler oil heating stove, 250-gallon oil tank, 
dishes, pots, pans, silverware. 

FARM MACHINERY — 46-B John Deere tractor (new rear tires), John Deere two-way plows, New Holland 
pickup baler with motor, cut-off saw for tractor, McCulloch chain saw, John Deere manure spreader, iron-wheel 
wagon, 2 cane mills with evaporator pan, hammermill, hay conveyor, 1,000-gal. water tank, horse-drawn equipment. 

One 1955 IVi-ton Chevrolet truck with cattle racks and grain racks. 

These properties may be seen any time by an appointment before auction date. The farms will be offered for 
sale at 1:00 P. M. The four tracts will be offered individually, then they will be grouped to procure highest bid. 

TERMS — Cash for personal property; 10% of sale price down payment on sale date with balance within thirty 
days (with deed) on real estate. 

LUNCH WILL BE SERVED. Not Responsible For Accidents 

LUTHER CROUCH, Administrator - Phone 823-1421 
C0LS0N ALTMAN, Auctioneer & Sales Manager - 824-6466 

DOODLE" B0BB, Auctioneer 
WILENA PETRIE, Real Estate Broker - 823-8331 



tri 



Thursday, January 28/1971 



Walton Advertiser; Walton, Kentucky 



JANUARY FURNITURE CLEARANCE 



■Mlfol ted 4 6,een »ta Living "* ** Ilbto 4 ■« ** °* WM 

Room Suite (reg. 349.95) $266.00 Sofa Bed Living Room Suite Covered In 

Long Wearing Bollaflex (2-Piece) only $119.95 

Hoover Dryer, operates on 110 ... u . ... _ . .. M «*. 
y0 li s $129 95 2 " Piece Mo(,ern Llvln 9 R° om * ul,e $119.95 

<A.u IB ii».ir. *" Piece Mo,,em L i vm 9 Room * ujte ' 

1 0nly-Maple Bunk Bed Set, reg. Couch 2 (hairs (reg. 349.95) now $266.00 

69.95 now only $48.00 

Early American 2-Piece Living Room Suite 

Hoover Washer $159.95 Covered In Nylon (reg. 349.95) now $288.00 



2-Piece Early American Living Room 
Suite with Wood Trim on Arms, 
regular 369.95 Special only $244.00 



YOU ALWAYS SAVE 




Benton -Bonar 



Beautiful Nylon Floral Couch with 
solid chajr only $359 ' 95 65 N. Main SI., Walton, Ky. 



Phone 485-4495 



Closeout On Metal Kitchen Cabinets 
Base Cabinets. . from $17.88 

Dish Cabinets from $24.88 

Utility Cabinets... from $9.88 

Metal Wall Cabinets, 42" $16.88 

Reg. 39.95 Roll-Away Bed, complete 
with Mattress (reg. 39.95) now $34.88 

25 Pet. Off On Odds & Ends of Serla 
Springs & Mattresses In Stock 

9x12 501 Nylon Rugs with Heavy Duty 
Foam Pag (reg. 79.95) special $66.00 

Check Our Money-Saving Prices 
On Whirlpool Appliances 



-DEATHS- 

CLAUDE CAMERON BURNS, JR. 

Walton man, employed as a teach- 
er and bus driver in Kenton County, 
was found dead in his school bus on 
Tuesday morning of last week. 



The Kenton County coroner's office 
ruled that the death of Claude Cam- 
erson Burns, Jr., 36, was caused by a 
self-inflicted gunshot wound. 

Mrs. Burns was called when her 
husband failed to start his run, and 
she found the body in the bus at 



Estate Auction 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6 - 10:30 A. M. 

LOCATION— 4 miles South of Ghent, Ky., on State Highway 47 (the 
Ghent-Sanders Road), and approximately 6 miles North of Sanders, Ky., 
in Carroll County, and is approximately 5 miles from Sparta-Warsaw 
Exit of 1-71. Watch for auction signs. 

In order to settle the estate of the late James Eli (Buck) Wheeler, I will 
sell the following: 

* REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL PROPERTY 

FARM — Consisting of 114 acres (more or less), has 1.04 acres tobacco 
base (1970), 6-acre corn base. This farm has approximately 10 acres of 
bottom land and approximately j65 acres of ridge land of which approxi- 
mately 60 acres is clean, open land; has 7 acres timber land, remainder is 
hill and rolling land, suitable for pasture; has 2 acres alfalfa hay, approxi- 
mately 20 acres mixed hay; plenty water (watered by 3 ponds, everlasting 
spring and creek), practically all of farm is in good grass except what was 
in cultivation the past year. This land is of good productive quality, being 
locust land, and has some locust which is now ready for posts, also has 
some walnut timber; has good line fence and good cross fence, and is 
fenced in several fields. 

IMPROVEMENTS — Frame house consisting of 4 rooms and a front 
'porch, good tobacco barn 54x45 feet with cistern, garage and stripping 
room 20x24 feet, feed barn 36x40 feet, corn crib, chicken house, and all 
necessary outbuildings. Immediate possession will be given to farm on 
day of sale with down payment and execution of contract. This farm may 
be Seen any day before day of sale — contact Mrs. Louise Beverly at the 
farm— phone 502-347-5518. This farm will sell at 1:00 P. M. day of 
sale. This farm is well \pcated, on good highway, mail, milk and school 
bus route service, within easy driving distance of a growing industrial 
area, and in a good community. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY (Household & Antiques)— Couch, RCA tele- 
vision, gossip bench, electric floor lamp, stand table, 3 coal stoves, table 
lamps, clock radio, lounge chair, large alarm clock, electric clock, 4 chairs, 
2 oak and 1 cane bottom chairs, lot books, bed and springs, folding bed, 
feather beds and pillows, oak dresser, oak wardrobe, walnut dresser, walnut 
vanity, chifferobe, 2 kitchen cabinets, Hardwick bottle gas cooking stove, 
wood stove, 7-piece dinette set, medicine cabinet, electric hot plate, table, 
2-burner oil stove, round table and chairs, lot dishes, lot cooking utensils, 
iron skillets, pots, pans, coffee pots, toasters, etc., wheat sacks printed 
and white sacks, washing machine, air conditioner, foot tub, buckets and 
dippers, large sea shells, cot, suitcase. 

ANTIQUES — Cherry bureau, cherry wardrobe, combination writing desk 
and bookcase (oak), 2 coffee grinders, butter mold, china cabinet, glass 
doors and glass sides, lot dishes (glass bowls, china, glasses, cups, platters, 
etc.) rolling pin and kneading board, muffin iron, iron wash boiler, iron 
kettle, wood washboard, picture frames, trunk, two 4-gallon cream cans, 
5-gallon cream can, oil lamps, lanterns, 3-gallon stone jars, 5-gallon stone 
jugs, 10-gallon glass jug, sausage mill, hay knife, farm dinner bell, Mason 
jars, mandolin guitar, flat irons, etc., stand table, sewing machine (pedal 

type). 

TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT, Corn, Small Tools and Miscellaneous— 
1968 model 140 International Farmall tractor (in good condition, good 
rubber), set 1-row cultivators, breaking plow, mower, side dresser, new 
seed sower, tractor harrows, tractor wagon and flat, D. C. Cast tractor 
(good rubber) and breaking plows, manure spreader, sled; 2-row com 
planter, McCulloch chain saw, harrows, band saw tractor 20', 2 wall to- 
bacco presses, lofnew lumber, 2 5-gallon buckets, black asphalt fiber 
roofing paint, 4 5-gallon buckets aluminum fiber roofing paint, pair plat- 
form scales, 6 10-gallon cans, 5 gallons No. 10 oil, 5 gallons 20 weight 
oil, 2 Vi-rolls barb wire, fluorescent lights, ice cream freezer, chickens 
(22 hens and 1 rooster), 2 ladders, 24x1 Oft. culvert, metal barrels, spider 
harrow, hillside plow, double-shovel plow, 2 laying-off plows, approximate- 
ly 25 barrels good yellow corn, sprayer, large tarpaulin, mail box, 1-man 
saw, 2-man saw, 2 pair barb wire stretchers, 2 tobacco setters, lot small 
tools (posthole diggers, axes, hoes, shovels, bench vise, hand saws, sledge 
hammers, chains, hand seed sowers, horse collars, etc.), 2 lawn chairs, 3 
lawn rockers, plus many other items too numerous to mention. 

(Not Responsible For Accidents) 

TERMS: Real estate, 20% of the purchase price to be paid down on 
day of saje; deed to pass to purchaser upon payment of balance of pur- 
chase price, which shall be no later than six months from date of sale. 
Personal property, cash. Lunch served on grounds. 

James Eli (Buck) Wheeler Estate 

MRS. LOUISE BEVERLY, Administratrix 

Ghent, Kentucky (Route 1) Phone 347-5518 

PAUL NOEL & W. D. SULLIVAN, Auctioneers 

ICarrolIton, Ky.— Phone 732-6721 Warsaw, Ky.— Phone 567-6331 
# • - i 



8:00 a. m., one-tenth mile South of 
Walton, on U. S. 25. 

Kentucky Police Detective Charles 
Seay, Walton, said that Burns left 
his home at 149 South Main St., Wal- 
ton, at about 7:30 a. m. He drove 
the bus to a gravel spot on the side 
of U. S. 25, where his wife found 
him. There were no children in the 
bus at the time. 

Seay said that Burns had been de- 
spondent over an illness. 

Burns taught ninth grade social 
studies at Twenhofel Junior High 
High School, Taylor Mill Road, near 
Nicholson. 

Besides his wife, Mrs. Janet Lee 
Anderson Burns, he is survived by a 
son, Andrew Cameron Burns, and one 
daughter, Laura Ann Burns, both at 
home, and his mother, Mrs. Lillian 
Walker Bums. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
last Friday at the Smith-Rees Funeral 
Home, Cynthiana. Visitation was from 
4:00 to 9:00 p. m., last Thursday at 
the Chambers and Grubbs Funeral 
Home, Walton. Burial was in the 
Kentontown Cemetery in Robertson 
County. 

CECIL R. FISK 

Cecil R. Fisk, 65, of Route 1, De- 
mossville, died last Saturday at St. 
Elizabeth Hospital. 

He is survived by a sister, Mrs. 
Verda Knight of Norwood, Ohio . 

Services were held at 11:00 a. m., 
Tuesday at the Wilmingtun Baptist 
Church,, Fiskburg. Burial was in the 
Wilmington Cemetery. 

Swindler Funeral Home, Indepen- 
dence, had charge of arrangements. 



Candid Weddings 

Color & Block & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, Walton 
. 485-4046 



GERALD G. ROLAND 

Gerald G. Roland, 37 died at his 
home on Beaver Road, at 4:15 a. m., 
Tuesday. Death was attributed to a 
heart attack. 

Mr. Roland had been under the 
care of a doctor for some time. He 
was employed by the Walton Lumber 
Company, where he had worked for 
about 20 years. 

He is survived by his wife, Shirley 
Brooks Roland; four sons and one 
daughter; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Omer Roland of Walton, and a broth- 
er,- Eugene Roland. 

Arrangements are being completed 
■Sly the Chambers & Grubbs Funeral 
Home, Walton. 

JOHN S. RICH 

John S. Rich, 79, of Verona, died 
last Sunday at his home. 

He is survived by two daughters, 
Mrs. Samuel Setters of Taylor Mill, 
and Mrs. Roy Brown of Walton; 
three sons, Virgil Rich of Union, and 
Kenneth and John Rich of Walton; a 
sister, Mrs. Peggy Moore of Cincin- 
nati, and two brothers, Harry Rich 
of Verona, and Jake Rich of Big Bone. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Tuesday at the Chambers cV Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. Burial was in 
the Big Bone Cemetery. 

Notes Of Servicemen 

Mar'ne Lance Corporal Charles M. 
Denton, son of Mrs. Jessie M. Denton 
of 60 North Main Street, and husband 
of the former Miss Evelyn M .Ensley 
of Old Lexington Pike both of Wal- 
ton, W3s promoted to his present rank 
while serving with the Second Marine 
Air Wing at the Marine Corps Air 
Station at Cherry Point, N. C. 

Never trust a man who says he's 
boss in his own house. He'll probably 
lie about other things, too. 

CARD OF THANKS ... 

Many thanks to the Wa-Na Club 
and everyone who sent cards, gifts, 
cookies and candies to me at Chiist- 
mas time. It was greatly appreciated. 
SGT. JOE G. NORRIS 
lt-4* Vietnam 





Ya say ya got a problem 
Ya don't know what to do 
Just put an ad in classified 
Dat's my advice to you. 




The first sign of fall was once fall- 
ing leaves, but now it is the appear- 
ance of Christmas merchandise in the 
stores. 



A gentleman on a bus was smoking 
a foul-smelling cigar. Turning to the 
little lady sitting next to him, he ask- 
ed, "My smoking won't bother you, 
will it?" "No", she replied, "not if 
my getting sick won't bother you." 

A large department store hired 
seven men to act as Santa Clauses for 
the holiday season. One man was put 
in charge. The other six were given 
the joint title "subordinate Clauses." 

"So you're a painter?" "Yep." 
"Paint nouses?" "Nope. Paint men 
and women." "Then you're an art- 
ist?" "Nope. Paint 'men' on one 
door and 'women' on the other." 

Hippie girl to hippie boy, "Of 
course I love you. What a stupid 
question! "I love everybody." 



Attention Kenton County Taxpayers 

—SPECIAL COLLECTION OFFICE 

INDEPENDENCE COURTHOUSE— Thursday, 9.00 a. m. to 3:00 
p. m. and Saturday, 9 a. m. to 12 noon. Please bring your Tax Bill. 

COVINGTON OFFICE— Monday through Friday, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 
p. m„ Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 12:00 noon. 



JOSEPH L. NIE 



SHERIFF OF KENTON COUNTY 



COVINGTON, KY. 



AUCTION 



BUTLER AUCTION HOUSE 

BUTLER, KENTUCKY PHONE 472-2880 

Paint - Brushes - Rollers - New & Used Furniture - Stoves - Rugs 



CARL LANCASTER 



AUCTIONEER-BROKER 
We Conduct Private Sales We Boy, Sell and Trade 




WsJftn Actertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



/ 




Thursday, January 28, 1971 



Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mam charge of 50c for 25 words or 
less— over 25 words, 2 cents per 
word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



for Sal 



FOR SALE— 1 to 1.0 acres. Bernard 
Stephenson, Stephenson Mill Road, 
Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4516 3t-4* 



.NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE— 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
-adding machines, cash registers, 
and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also carry 
■ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
^rental machines. For free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. tf-8c 

FOR SALE— '62 Chev 6 cyl. motor 
and transmission, $35.00; also four 
14" tires, $35.00. 356-2403. lt-4* 

FOR SALE— Duroc and Hampshire 
feeder pigs; also a few 150-lb. shoats. 
Gordon Moore, Old Lexington Pike, 
Walton, Ky. 493-5391. 2t-3* 

SPINET-CONSOLE PIANO — Want- 
ed, responsible party to take over 
spinet piano. Easy terms. Can be 
seen locally. Write Credit Manager, 
P. O. Box 276, Shelbyville, Indiana 
46176.. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

FOR SALE — Birch cabinets, comer 
sink arrangement, room divider bar. 
Need quick sale. Best offer. Call 
356-9713 after 4 p. m. 2t-4* 

REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

FOR SALE— 22 New Hampshire Red 
baking hens. 359-4588. 2t-4* 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing 
■of all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 
249-A Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. tf-3c 

FOR SALEr-5-room house and lot, 
good location, South Walton. Call 
after 5 p. m., 493-5506. Possible 
land contract. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE! — Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vaccinated. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

tf-2c 



FOR SALE— Blodnmd stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at'the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE — Used electric range, a 
Westinghouse, $35.00. Telephone 
472-2247. lt-4* 

FOR SALE— Hay. 485-7609. 2t-3* 

FOR SALE — Two bedroom mobile 
home, reasonable. After 6:00 p. m., 
call 356-6780. 2t-4* 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impala Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone, 
Ky. tf-47 

FOR SALE— 1,000 bales mixed hay. 
Sold farm. Call after 6:00 p. m., 
356-6428. 2t-4* 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-lOc 

FOR SALE — Jersey cow, cheap; one 
black saddle mare, bred to a Ten- 
nessee Walker. 356-6021. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE or TRADE— Good Ford 
lVi-ton farm truck, V-8, good bed 
and cattle racks, or trade for stock. 
Baker Bros., U. S. 42. Telephone 
485-7240. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. tf-49c 



section %m? 



RATES OF WALTON ADVERTISER 

Local Display _ 60c per column inch 

Foreign Display (6c per line) 84c per column inch 

Mats or Plates — Deadline Monday Noon 

Classified Ads, Cards of Thanks. 50c minimum 

(2c per word if in excess of 25 words) — Payable In 
Advance. No Phone CaHs. Deadline Tuesday, 10 a. m. 

Legal Advertising $1.00 per column inch 

—OFFICE HOURS— 

Monday-Friday 8 a. m. to 12 noon, 12:30 to 4:30 

Social News Deadline :...... J 2:00 Noon, Monday 

Phone 485-4962 



FOR SALE — Horse-drawn mowing 
machine, John Deere 12-inch tractor 
plows, 3 antique telephones, and a 
mink coat. Call 356-2479. 2t-4* 

VACUUM CLEANER— Paint damag- 
ed vacuum cleaners still in factory 
cartons, complete with all 7 cleaning 
tools. Reduced to $16.50 cash price 
or terms available. Call 689-7936. 

2t-3c 

FOR SALE— 1970 Jacobsen 12 h. p. 
Chief tractor and 48-inch mower. 
356-9720 after 7 p. m. ■ 3t-2c 



WANTED— Ride, Walton to Indus- 
trial Park, Florence. Arrive 7:00 a. 
m., leave 3:00 p. m. Please phone 

, '485-4823. lt-4* 

WANTED— Cash 'for any kind of 
real estate, regardless of price or 
condition. Rel S. (Buck) Wayman, 
356-5068. tf-51c 



V 



For Rent- 



HELP WANTED-Full or part time. 
Men or wornj*h; unlimited oppor- 
tunity. 485-7560, 371-5023. 4M* 

WANTED— I will care for child in 
my home, age 3 and up, 5 days; 
Walton-Independence area. Phone 
356-6337. lt-4* 



FOR SALE — . Truck camper jafcks, 
hold downs and mirrors, also four 
trailer jacks, one boy's 26-inch bike, 
$5.00. Phone 356-5596 after 6:00 
P- m. 2t-4* 



FOR SALE— Two snow tires, on rims, 
size 13x7.50 for Chevy II. Phone 
291-4518. 2t-3* 



„. FOR SALE 



16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



FOR SALE — Three 800-lb. steers, 
com fed, ready for deepfreeze; also 
18-months-old green broke Walking 
Horse. Call 356-5129. 2t-4c 

TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— Mixed hay. Telephone 
485-7108. lt-4* 

FOR SALE— Purebred German Shep- 
herd pups, cheap; also Chihuahua 
stud service. Phone 654-3914, or 
write Doris Brownfield, Route 2, 
Butler, Ky. 41006 2t-3* 

FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5-speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 

FOR SALE— 1965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 

FOR SALE— Black bucket seats for a 
Chevrolet, good condition, $35.00. 
Call 485-4788 or 371-9886. lt-4* 

SEWING MACHINE — Brand new 
1970 model, does all fancy work, 
even writes names, simply turn lever 
and sew. Price reduced to $28.00 
cash price because of small scratches 
in shipping, or terms available. Call 
689=7936. 2t-3c 



FOR RENT— Sleeping room, and a N 1 I f F 

bachelor apartment. Call after 5:00 ' " V L 

p. m., 485-4536 or 485-7319. 85 
North Main St., Walton. tf-3c 



FOR RENT— Modem 8-room house, 
30 acres, $200 month; with .38 
acre tobacco, $250 month. Avail- 
able February 15th. Call Monday- 
Friday, 9:00 to 300, 522-6310. 

2t-4* 

HOUSE FOR RENT— 4 rooms and 
bath, utility, close to Greyhound 
bus and mail route, no pets, not 
more than two children; on Cleek 
Lane; want reference. Call or see 
in person. Phone 485-4030. Albert 
Rosenstiel, Route 2, Box 422, Wal- 
ton, Ky. lt-4* 

FOR RENT — 3-room house, and a 
2-room house. Elzie Webster, Ellis- 
ton, Ky., Route 1, 41038. Phone 
824-6617. 4t-4* 



NOTICE — Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan! 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 



A miracle drug is a medicine you 
can get a child to take without a 
fight. 




Wanted 



FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 



WANTED — Someone interested in 
old, dilapidated barn for heavy 
timber and some wide siding. Call 
356-6223. lt-4* 

WANTED — Farms and country 
homes. Any condition, cash buyers 
waiting. Free appraisal. Will come 
to your property at any time. Rel 
S. (Buck) Wayman, 356-5068. We 
specialize in the sale of farms and 
country homes. 6t-51c 

WANTED TO BUY— Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 



Don't throw out good ttou- 
sers just because the cuffs are 
frayed; you can easily turn the 
cuffs! 

Turn stale rolls into a gour- 
met's delight by making dump- 
lings out of them. Recipe: 
Cube 5 hard, stale rolls and fry 
them in 8 tablespoons of shor- 
tening with V4 onion (minced) 
and .finely chopped parsley. 
When crisp, pour a mixture of 
1 egg, 1 cup of milk and salt 
over the cubes. £dd 8 table- 
spoons of flour and stir every- 
thing together into one big 
ball. Drop into boiling, salted 
water and cook for about 10 
minutes. 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 



HOME 




IMPROVEMENT LOANS 
FOR WINTER 

how about... 




CHECK YOUR NEEDS - THEN CHECK WITH US 
Low Bank Rates — repayment terms to suit YOU! 




Dixie State Bank 



Save by Mail! 



Walton, Ky. 

Phone 485-4121 




Interest Checks Mailed Semi- Annually 



Member F. D. I. C. 
Accounts* Insured to $20,000.00 



* -* 



: 



path to your door, just lie down and 
take a nap. 



If you want the world to beat a PLUMBING SERVICES — New 

work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. . t£-34c 



Services— 



AT STUD— Patchy Yamin Jr., 45,818, 
loud black and white leopard Appa- 
loosa.idndiana Appaloosa Assn. High 
point Stallion in 1966-1 967-1 %8. 
Many first place wins in Halter, 
Pleasure, Costume and Color Class. 
Has produced some very loud foals 
even from solid color mares. Service 
fee, $100.00. Free mare care. Also 
horse for sale. Call area code 812- 
689-6268. Tee-Pee Stables, Ver- 
sailles, Indiana. lt-4* 



WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists; radios and stereos. Used TV's, 
perfect condition, guaranteed 30 
days. 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 
Phone 485-7616. tf-3c 



JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. tf-lc 



COLES BEAUTY SHOP — Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50- and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 

LIVESTOCK HAULING — Robert 
Richardson, 356-6749 or 291-S370. 

16t-44* 



DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 



STEWART'S CUSTOM FARM 
WORK— Plowing, disking, grass 
seed sowing, mowing and baling 
hay, posthole digging. Call for 
free estimate. Phone 356-5700 or 
356-9905. tf-13c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE— 
Now written to everyone, if driv- 
ing record is goocT; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington. Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cox 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m, 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. tf-38c 

SEPTIC TANKS-Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS— Precast; sales 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 

BUILD UP ROOFING — Shingles, 
gutter work, patch work of all kinds. 
New roof warranty. Free estimates. 
Phone 356-9853 or 356-7100. 

20t-39* 



ELOISE BEAUTY SALON— 125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 

p 'II-.— 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS— For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Fridav, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC- 
IATION, 30 Needmore St., Waiton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 

TRAVELERS INSURANCfTcO^ 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac- 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Oc 



LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON-Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
493-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 



FASHIONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, personal 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fashioaette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf-29c 

YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER — In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines ss 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoovei 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Girard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 years in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00. tf-29c 



INTERIOR PAINTING 

EXPERTLY DONE 

—FREE ESTIMATES- 
RALPH FOLTZ, 356-5987 



INCOME TAX 

ROGER SAYkOR 

Crittenden, Ky. 
824-4212 . 



PUBLIC AUCTION 




THREE SCHOOL BUILDINGS: 

The Owen County Board of Education Will Sell at 
Public Auction the Following Real Estate b Property: 

Bethany School 

JANUARY 30 — 10:30 A. M. 

Two buildings, 12 rooms, large gymnasium, indoor plumbing and toilet 
facilities. L ocated on a 3.44-acre site approximately 12 miles Sooth of 
Owenton, on U. S. Highway 227. 

Monterey School 

JANUARY 30 — 1:30 P. M. 

Five-room building, oil furnace. Located on 1.75-acre site near Monterey 
on U. S. Highway 127. 

J 

New Liberty School 

FEBRUARY 13 — 1:30 P. M. 

Eight-room building, large gymnasium, city water, oil furnace. Located 
on a 2.29-acre site in New Liberty on U. S. Highway 227. 

* • * 

All plumbing and electrical fixtures attached to above property wifl be 
sold with buildings. Several items of furniture and kitchen equipment 
will be sold at each building. 

TERMS— Real estate, 20% down, balance upon delivery of deed. 

Furniture and equipment, cash. 

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 

OWEN COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION 

PAUL NOEL— AUCTIONEER 






Thursday, January 28, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton/ Kentucky 



TRI-COUNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

— RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL __ 

REMODELING & REPAIR 

r 

Trenching & Installation of Gas & Water Service 

824-6665 or 356-7477 



WANTED 



Tenant for 200-acre farm, large tobacco base, beef 
| cattle program. Must have tools. Good opportunity 

i for responsible person. 

■ 
■ 

CALL 331-3505 AFTER 6:00 P. M. 
■ or write 

| WILLIAM MIDDENDORF 

1941 PROVINCIAL LANE COVINGTON, KY. 

■ 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 



Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax report service 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where 1971 changes were taught. 
He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

: DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE! 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 - 1 Mile South of Walton 
Phone 356-2172 



rr 




MAKE 

"EXTRA 

MONEY 

WITHOUT 

EXTRA 

WORK 



Make your money work as hard as you do. Our rate 
of return will add up regularly to help build your in- 
sured savings quickly and effortlessly. Open your 
account with us today! 

ACCOUNTS INSURED TO $20,000.00 

ROSEDALE SAVINGS 

Caroline and Southern Avenues Covington, Ky. 
—Phone 431-7723— 



COL.KENNER'Sj 

Appliance Co. I 

5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440: 

■ 

SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS, S 

REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS, ETC. ■ 

(Over 20 Years In the Service Business) 



BankAmericard and Master Charge Honored 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG & COLEMAN GAS fir OIL STOVES! 



Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 



BEAVER LICK 

Mrs. Bertha Jack is on the lisk list 
this week and under the care of a 
doctor. We all hope she's feeling a 
lot better by now. 

A group of young folk from More- 
head University, were at the Beaver 
Baptist Church last Sunday. After 
church all went home with Sandy 
Stephenson for dinner. In the after- 
noon, all attended the baptismal ser- 
vice at Union for Mary Wood, who 




BY LAWRENCE W. ALTHOUSE 



RUMBLINGS 
IN THE VINEYARD! 

Lesson for January 31, 1971 



Background Scripture: Matthew 19:23 
through 20:16. 

At the beginning of the twen- 
tieth century, most Christians 
were Europeans, Russians, or 
North Americans. By the beginn- 
ing of the next century, however, 
it is predicted that Christianity 
will have shifted its base in a 
southerly direc- 
tion and will be 
well on its way to 
becoming pre- 
! dominantly a re- 
[ligion of non- 
whites. Africa, 
Asia, and Latin 
\ America will most 
likely be its new 
focus. 



was baptised by Bro. G. E. Vaughn 
of Beaver Baptist. 

Lon Wilson is back home from 
the hospital but isn't improving as 
well as his friends and neighbors would 
like for him to. Maybe, when the 
weather gets warm, he will fed much 
better. 

Mrs. Ferguson of Beaver is on the 
sick list; also Keith Collins of Cleek 
Lane. 

'' Mrs. Al Crouch is all full of pep 
and getting anxious. She just heard 
her son, Butch, is coming in soon 
from service on a 10-day leave. 

Albert RosenStiel was called to the 
Falmouth Hospital, last Friday night, 
where his sister is reported to be in a 
serious condition. 



Slaffordsburg 

Mis. J. A. Keeney, Reporter 

We are glad that R. S. Hinsdale 
is back in Kentucky, and we wish him 
to know that many are praying for his 
complete recovery. 

We were shocked to leam of the 
serious illness of our one-time mail 
carrier, Randall Wagner. We would 
that if it be His will, the healing 
touch of God be given him. 
v Miss Neva Jo Finnell, who went 



_J>ack to school on Tuesday, had a 
sore throat again on Friday. We hope 
it was just a temporary setback and 
that she will soon be able to be in 
her usual good health. 

Casee Brinkley tells us that his 
doctor is well pleased with his pro- 
gress, but to him it seems very slow. 
We think he will be much happier 
when he can get out of doors more. 

We were glad to welcome Mrs. 
Charles Losey back to church Sunday. 

We called on Mrs. Ernest Ryle on 
Thursday and were very pleased at her 
recovery following recent surgery. 

Had a letter from Mrs. Everett 
Mller (Thelma Keeney). They have 
moved into Waco and like their apart- 
ment. Ida is about as usual. Thelma 
sends greetings to all. 

Dawson Ballinger, who has been ill, 
is feeling better. He had x-rays taken 
and is reassured that while he has 
pain, he is not in danger. Wish for 
him better health. 

I enjoyed very much a call from 
Edgar Riggs. His call was on business 
but that was quickly ended and then 
we just visited for an hour. 

I talked recently with Mabel Gate- 
wood. She seemed to have good health 
this winter. Said she was feeling very 
well, and to greet her old friends and 
neighbors. 





* 



Rev. Althouse 



The "others" who will come in 

By the end of this century, ac- 
cording to a report of the Africa 
Department of the National Coun- 
cil of Churches, the number of 
African, for example, will be 
about 351 million or 46 per cent 
of the continent's population. In 
1900, by comparison, there were 
about 4 million African Christ- 
ians, or 3 per cent of the total- 
population of Africa. "For sheer 
size and rapidity of growth," says 
a National Council spokesman, 
"this must be one of the most 
spectacular stories in history. 
This tremendous growth of Afri- 
can Christianity may "well give 
Christianity a permanent non- 
Western base." It may not be too 
far-fetched, say some observers, 
to envision a day when mission- 
, aries from Africa and Latin 
America might be sent to evan- 
gelize in the very Western .coun- 
tries that first brought the gospel 
to them. 

Many of us will have two dif- 
ferent reactions to this news. On 
the one hand there will be a feel- 
ing of gratification. After all 
these years of struggling and 

worrying over our overseas mis- 
sions efforts, it seems they are to 
bear fruit perhaps beyond our 
greatest dreams. How wonderful 
to know that the Gospel has made 
such great progress in what we 
once called "the dark continent." 

"Our Vineyard" 

Yet, mixed with the elation of 
this "success story" there may 
be feelings of disquiet. Suppose 
Christianity should become "pre- 
dominantly a religion of non- 
whites?" Suppose the next cen- 
tury should give Christianity "a 
permanent non-Western base?" 
We have long believed that the 
nonwhite had a place in Chris- 
tianity. We have prepared that 
place and everything has been 
fine so long as they have stayed 
within it. Until now they have al- 
ways seemed to know their place: 
we are the "Daddy's" and they 
are the "children." 

Today, however, they are not 
staying in their place. According 
to the article, they are beginning 
to move up into our place, and 
that shakes us up. 

For too long we have regarded 
the Church as "our vineyard." 
We broke the soil, planted the 
seeds, tended the vines — surely 
the fruit is ours to dispense as we 
please! But we are quite wrong 
and have always ben wrong about 
the vineyard: it is not ours, it 
never has been, it never will be. 
The Church belongs to God, no 
matter who erected its buildings, 
' paid its debts, or held its offices. 

\ ... "What belongs to mo" 

It has never belonged to the 
Western world. Anglo-Saxons got 
the Good News from Italians and 
Greeks, and these got it from 
Jews. It began, not in the West, 
but in the Near East and among 
its first converts were black Cop- 
tics and brown Egyptians. 

Many of us have come to look 
upon the Church as many re- 
garded the Kingdom in Jesus' 
time. They thought it belonged 
to them and when Jesus told of 
"outsiders" coming in, they were 
upset. Thus, in the parable, the 
owner of the vineyard says to the 
malcontented: "Friend, I am do- 
ing you no wrong . . . Am I not 
allowed to do what I choose with 
what belongs to me?" 

It is that same question which 
God poses to those who niurmer 
, in )&is yh—**& today. 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 

Samples Shown In the Home 

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These plus benefits add up 
Is a big difference for you. 

Call or write us today for 
full facts. 

J. B. JOHNSON 

93 North Main Street 

WALTON, KY. 

485-7102 



REPRESENTING 
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HOME OFFICE* COLUMBUS, OHIO 




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^iiiliveone to thank 

• •• ■ - "God is a product of man's imagination," announced the dignified in- 
tellectual who occupied our TV screen. "God isn't dead," he argued as our 
children watched. "He was never alivel" 

Mary and I felt that Christian children such as ours should realize that 
not everyone believes in God. Perhaps, knowing this, they could better un- 
derstand the state of the world. We would encourage and answer their 
questions as best we could, confident that God would not allow their faith 
to be destroyed. 

Later, before I tucked Kristen into bed, she clasped her hands and closed 

her eyes. "Dear Lord," she prayed, "Thank you for Mommy and Daddy. Thank 

you for Zoomie (her goldfish) and Toddy and my new dress . . ." She stopped 

v suddenly, and I raised questioning eyes to her. "Daddy," she said anxiously, 

"that man on TV doesn't have anyone to thank!" 

Do you have Someone to thank? Come to church this Sunday. 

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 
Hebrews Hebrews James I Peter II Peter II Peter I John 

#1-13 6:1-12 1i21-27 2«1-10 1:16-21 3:1-9 3:18-24 

Scriptures selected by dw Afflarkan Bible Society Copyright 1971 Keister Advertising Service, Inc., Strasburg, Virginia 

The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 

ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON HALL ELEC. & APPL. SERVICE 

Phone 485-4600 North Msin St., Walton Phone 488-4087 Walton, Kentucky 




BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PEOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

Phone 485-4888 • Walton, Kentucky 

BENTON-BONAR DEPT. STORE 

Phone 4854495 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE COUNTY FARtvi SUPPLY 

Phone 358-2172 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or 371-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 358-3081 Nicholson 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

Phone 485-4121 

—— ' > I I———— 



MOTCH— JEWELERS 

613 Madison Avenue Covington, Kentucky 

READNOUR COAL b FEED 

Phone 4854504 Walton, Kentucky 

JOS. J. HOBAN INSURANCE AGENCY 

ROBERTS INSURANCE AGENCY 
Phone 485-4149 Walton, Kentucky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ad" Ryan 4854161 Walton, By. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 485-9111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 4854962 "Your Local Newspaper" 

WALTON HDW. fir DRY GOODS 

4854609 Cuff Ryan, Prop. 

WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, January 28, 1971 



TOP HATS 4-H CLUB 

The January meeting of the Top 
Hats 4-H Club was held January 14 
at the home of Patti and Pam Mul- 
lins. The meeting was called to order 
by the president, and pledges were 
also led by the president. 

The secretary-treasu/ei; read the min- 
utes and treasurer's- teport. Both were 
approved. We discussed the variety 
show, which will beheld March 5 or 
12. This we are planning to make a 
definite decision at the next meeting. 

We also are going to have a bake 
sale which will be held n April on 
Good Friday. We chose a committee 
to plan and get things set up for the 
sale. Those appointed by Chris Sip- 
pie, president, were Susan Campbell, 



Cathy Jackson, and Pam Mullins. So, 
everyone start deciding what kind of 
goodies you want to buy. 

We also talked about the 4-H skat- 
ing party, which will be held Febru- 
ary 2, in Latonia. We would like to 
remind all 4-H'ers about the officer 
training which will be January 30 aP 
2:30 at the Independence Courthouse 
and the foods training, February 20, 
1:30 at the RECC Building, Inde- 
pendence. 

We decided to have the next meet- 
ing a week earlier so we can get start- 
ed on the variety show The meeting 
will be at the home of Cathy and 
David Jackson after school, Feb. 4. 

Those who attended were Mrs. Rid- 
dell, leader; members, Lynn Rice, 



ORDINANCE NO. 1971-1 

An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to 
the existing westerly corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present westerly corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory J>e annexed to and become a part of the corporate terri- 
tory of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

SECTION 1. That all territory located within the boundary hereinafter 
set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth 
class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, said point being the 
point of intersection of the existing City Limits with Beaver Grade Road ap- 
proximatey 670 feet northwest of the west right of way of 1-75; thence North- 
easterly with the existing City Limits 640 feet, more or less, to the right of 
way of 1-75; thence Northeasterly with the right of way of 1-75, 900 feet, more 
or less, to the right of way of 1-71 Southbound ramp to 1-75; thence with the 
right of way curve to the left 1200 feet, more or less, to the southeast right of 
way of 1-71; thence Southwesterly with the 1-71 right of way 1680 feet, more 
or less, to a point 300 feet from Beaver Grade Road, thence 300 feet from an 
parallel to Beaver Road southeasterly 2650 feet, more or less, to the existing 
City Limits; thence Northwesterly with the existing City Limits 910 feet, more 
or less, to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sec- 
tion 81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky F.evised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and henceforth be considered 
as with the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

SECTION 4. AH ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
the remaining sections of said ordinance would have been passed despite such 
invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 4 members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 and February 4, 11, 18, 1971 



Pam Mullins, Cathy Jackson, Chris 
Sipple, David Jackson, Mike Sipple, 
Ralph Collins, and Patti Mullins. — 
Reporter 

School Menu ... 

Walton-Verona Schools 

Jan. 25— Italian spaghetti, cole slaw, 

bread, butter, apple pie, milk. 

Jan. 26 — Chili and crackers, peanut 
butter sandwich, celery sticks, brown- 
ies, milk. 

Jan. 27 — Creamed turkey, dressing, 
candied sweet potatoes, buttered peas, 
jello, cookies, milk. 

Jan. 28 — B*ef stew, cole slaw, ice 
cream, hot combread, butter, milk. 

Jan. 29— Grilled cheese, green beans, 
pineapple-cheese, chocolate pudding, 
milk. 

CARD OF THANKSr- 

I want to thank my friends and 
neighbors for their cards, visits and 
prayers while I was in St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. May the Lord bless each 
and everyone. 
lt-4* MRS. ERMA STOCKMAN 

Wife to husband: I scratched the 
fender a little, dear. If you want to 
look at it, it's in the back seat. 



LOSE DRIVER LICENSES 

Listed below are the names of in- 
dividuals who have lost their drivers 
license for the week ending Jan. 15, 
as released by the Department of 
Public Safety to the Traffic Safety 
Coordinating Committee, Frankfort: 

BOONE COUNTY: Sidney Allen, 
24, of 236 Evergreen Drive, Florence, 
until June 17, 1971; Gerald Sprinkle, 
32, of 4 Park Avenue, Burlington, 
until June 14, 1971; Gary Caudill, 22, 
of 22 Julia Ave., Florence, until Mar. 
11, 1971; Daryl K. Baker, 27 ,of 69 
Marian Drive, Florence, until July 11, 
1971; William H. Gross, 30, of 2 
East Park Drive, Burlington, until July 
7, 1971; Mark W. Rahschulte, 21, of 
105 Valley Drive, Florence, until Aug. 



3, 1971; pavid O. Huffman, 20, of 
8693 Dixie Highway, Florence, until 
Dec. 14, 1971; Robert M. Hobbs, 34, 
of 16 Bedinger Ave., Walton, six 
months. 

KENTON COUNTY: James Rob- 
ert Allen, 51,<JR..ch Road, Morning 
View, until June 2, 1971; Denver K. 



NOTICE- 



The City Council of the City of 
Walton, will meet at 8:00 A. M., 
Saturday, January 30, 1971, at the 
site of construction of the water line 
on Stephenson Mill Road, for the 
purpose of inspecting said construction. 
Owners of the abutting properties and 
other interested parties are hereby 
notified of said inspection and may be 
heard at that time. 

CITY OF WALTON 
lt-4c Daisy Hill, City Clerk 



WALLPAPER 

FOY JOHNSON FINE FAINT 

Picture Frames - All Sizes 

WALL-TEX ART SUPPLIES 

LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 

264 MAIN STREET FLORENCE, KY. 

—Parking In Rear — Phone 371-7921 — 



State Bank No. 73-763 
Consolidated Report of Condition of 



DIXIE STATE BANK 



of Walton, in the State of Kentucky, and Domestic Subsidiaries 
at the close of business on December 30, 1970. 

ASSETS 

Cash and due from banks (including none unposted debits) $ 776,072.17 



U. S. Treasury securties 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 

Other securities (including none corporate stocks) 
Federal funds sold and securities purchased under 

agreements to resell 

Other loans 



Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other assets 

representing bank premises 

Other assets 

TOTAL ASSETS 



1,378*315.33 
549,490.87 
400.00 

90,000.00 
3,061,341.24 



L IABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations 

Time and savings deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations 

Deposits of United States Government . 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 

Certified and officers' checks, etc. 



TOTAL DEPOSITS $5,283,687.58 

(a) Total demand deposits $2,421,111.19 

(b) Total time and savings deposits _ - 2,862,576.39 
Other liabilities 



- 23,658.92 

3,572.71 

$5,882,851.24 



-$2,266,302.63 

_ 2,782,576.39 

_ 37,493.40 

_ 191,535.02 

5,780.14 



- 60,801.14 

.$5,344,488.72 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 

RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 

Reserve for bad debt losses on loans (set up pursuant to 

Interna] Revenue Service rulings) $ 

TOTAL RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES $ 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 
Common stock-total par value $ 100,000.00 



22,796.24 
22,796.24 



(Number shares authorized 1,000) 
(Number shares outstanding 1,000) 
Surplus 



Undivided profits 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES, AND 
CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



MEMORANDA 

Average of total deposits for the 15 calendar days 
- ending with call date 



- 200,000.00 

- 215,566.28 

- 515,566.28 

$5,882,851.24 



.$5,157,868.68 



Average of total loans for the 15 calendar days 

ending with call date 3,025,113.78 

I, James W. Spencer, Vice-President and Cashier of the above-named 
bank, do solemnly swear that this report of condition is true and correct, 
to the best of my knowledge and belief. 
Correct— Attest: JAMES W. SPENCER 

A. H. Gaines, G. W. Baker and C. D. Benson, Directors 
State of Kentucky, County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 22nd day of January 1971, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

Blanche Roberts, Notary Public 
My commission expires August 14, 1971. 



ORDINANCE NO. 1970-30 

An ordinance accepting the bid of Cincinnati Bell, Inc., a corporation 
authorized to do business under the laws of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, 
and awarding said company, its successors and assigns, a. franchise, right and 
privilege of entering in and upon the streets, alleys and highways and public 
places of the City of Walton, a municipal corporation of the fifth class situated 
in Boone County, Kentucky, to erect and maintain a telephone, telegraph and 
general communications system; to erect, place and maintain poles, crossarms, 
wires, cables and other aerial fixtures; to place and maintain buried cables and 
wires and to construct and maintain underground conduits, manholes, and 
other underground fixtures and to place and maintain therein cables, wires and 
equipment; and to construct, place and maintain such other appurtenances as 
may be necessary to operate said system for the purpose of furnishing telephone, 
telegraph and general communications services by means of wires, radio or re- 
lated or appropriate facilities to subscribers and customers, and in connection 
y therewith to do a telephone, telegraph and general communications business 
for a term of twenty (20) years, under ordinance adopted November 17, 1970. 

The Council of the City of Walton, a municipal corporation of the fifth 
class, situated in Boone County, Kentucky, does ordain as follows- 

WHEREAS, the Council of the City of Walton on November 17, 1970, 
adopted Ordinance No. 1970-26 directing the City Clerk to advertise by one 
insertion in the ' newspaper of widest circulation in the City of Walton, the 
insertion in said newspaper to be not less than seven days before December 1 5, 
1970 that bids would be received in her office within the times designated, in 
said advertisement for the franchise, right and privilege of entering in and up»n, 
through, under and along the streets, alleys, sidewalks, and public ways and 
places of the City of Walton, as it is now or may hereafter be enlarged, to 
construct and maintain a telephone, telegraph and general communications 
system; to erect and maintain poles, crossarms, wires, cables and other aerial 
fixtures; to place and maintain buried cables and wires and construct and main- 
tain underground conduits, manholes and other underground fixtures and to 
place and maintain therein cables, wires and equipment; and to construct and 
maintain such other appurtenances as may be necessary to operate said system 
for the purpose of furnishing telephone, telegraph and general communications 
services by means of wires, radio or related or appropriate facilities, and in con- 
nection therewith to do a telephone, telegraph and general communications busi- 
ness under the terms and conditions hereinafter set out, for a period of twenty 
(20) years, and directing the City Clerk at the next meeting of the Council, 
after the time fixed to receive bids, to. return the bids received by her, same to 
be opened by the Council in open session, and 

WHEREAS, the City Clerk pursuant to directions in said Ordinance No. 
1970-26 did thereafter, to wit, on November 26, 1970 advertise in the Walton 
Advertiser that she would on or before December 15, 1970 receive bids in the 
manner and for the purposes in said ordinance set out, and 

WHEREAS, said City Clerk did return the bids received by her for said 
franchise to the Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 15, 1970, the first meeting of this Council held after receipt of said bids, 
and said bids were t^g-eupon opened at said meeting, and the bid of Cincinnati 
Bell Inc. was the highest and best bid received for said franchise. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE COUNCIL OF 
THE CITY OF WALTON, KENTUCKY: 

SECTION 1— That the bid of Cincinnati Bell Inc., a corporation authorized 
to do business under the laws of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, its successors 
and assigns, for the aforementioned franchise, which bid was received by this 
Council at its regular meeting held on Tuesday, December 15, 1970, be and 
is hereby accepted and that said franchise, right and privilege described in the 
aforesaid advertised ordinance be and it is hereby awarded to Cincinnati Bell 
Inc., its successors and assigns, for the full period of twenty (20) years beginning 
from the day and date of the adoption or this Ordinance. 

SECTION 2 — This Ordinance shall take effect and be in force when 
passed, recorded and published according to law. 

The above Ordinance was passed by majority vote of the members of the 
Council present at the regular meeting of the Council of the City of Walton, 
Kentucky, held on December 15, 1970, given a second reading and adopted at 
the regular meeting held January 19, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk Published 1/28/71. 



COMPLETE INCOME TAX SERVICE 
Harold R. Weaver & Associate 

Farmer, Business, Professional, and Personal. 
Phone for Appointment or Stop In. 

Box 3, Big Bone Road Phone 

Union, Kentucky 41091 384-3330 

Don't Be Lote — 27 Years Experience! 



[ LIFE BEGINS WITH A HOME OF YOUR | 
[ OWN. SEE FIRST — <- * - S 
5 FEDERAL FOR 
8 THE LOAN. 




I 






(H?ST[-£DERAL 

Savinqs*Loan Association 

OF COVINGTON A 

5th & Main Streets — Covington, Ky. 

ELSERE, KY. LATONIA, KY. 

3715 Dixie Highway 36th & Decowaey Ave. 

DIXIE HIGHWAY-SOUTH OF WALTON 






Hacker, 19, of 344 Cintonya, Erlan- 
ger, six months; Jeffrey R. Michels, 
19, of 3126 Riggs Ave., Erlanger, six 
months; Neal R. Sparks, 26, of 3226 
Turkey Foot Road, Ft. Mitchell, six 
months; Michael A. Beagle, 19 r _.of 
408 Stevenson Road, Erlanger, six 
months. 



ORDINANCE NO. 1971-2 
An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to 
the existing North and West corporate limits of the City of Walton, Ken- 
tucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best intersest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present northwest corporate limits of the 
City, and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate 
territory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

SECTION 1 . That all the territory located within the boundary herein- 
after set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a 
fifth class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to^be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING AT the northeast corner of the existing City limits: thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of the C. N. O. & T. P. Railroad 
1060 feet, more or less, or sufficient to reach the north right of way of Ken- 
tucky No. 16; thence Easterly with said Kentucky No. 16, 100 feet, more or 
less, or sufficient to reach the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike; thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike 1220 feet, 
more or less, to the south right of way of Chambers Road; thence Northwesterly 
with the south right of way of Chambers Road 2300 feet, more or less; thence 
Southeasterly 300 feet, more or less; thence 300 feet from an parallel to 
Chambers Road southeasterly 1650 feet, more or less, to a point 300 feet from 
Ur S. Highway No. 25; thence 300 feet from and parallel to U. S. No. 25 
southwesterly 216J3 feet, more or less, to a point in the Parker tract; thence 
with the Parker tract and projection of said tract line southeasterly 450 feet, 
to the existing City Limits; thence Northeasterly with the existing City Limits 
450 feet more or less; thence Southeasterly with the existing City Limits 340 
feet, more or less, to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in 
Section 81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statues, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

SECTION 4. All ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
the remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regu- 
meeting of Council by a vote of^ members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 and February 4, 11, 18, 1971 



BOB & DENNY'S AUTO BODY 



5824 MADISON PIKE 



NICHOLSON, KY. 



Phone 356-2346 



—INSURANCE WORK— 

Free Estimates and Free Pickup and Delivery 

COMPLETE BODY & PAINT WORK 



DO YOU KNOW . . . 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As^ow As $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market 



State Bank No. 73-625 
Consolidated Report of Condition of 



VERONA BANK 



of Verona, in the State of Kentucky, and Domestic Subsidiaries 

at the close of business on December 31, 197tf. 

ASSETS 

Cash and due from banks (including none unposted debits) $ 211,380.41 

Securities of other U. S. Government 

agencies and corporations. _____ 231,531.00 

Obligations of States ^nd political subdivisions 94,108.44 

Other securities (including none corporate stocks). I 1 00 

Other loans _ 821,978.02 

Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other 

assets representing bank premises... 54,991.70 

TOTAL ASSETS .. $1,413,990.57 

-—LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations 

Time and savings deposits of individuals, 

partnerships, and corporations 

Deposits of United States Government 



Deposits of States and political subdivisions 

TOTAL DEPOSITS ...... $1,223,070.41 

(a) Total demand deposits 584,009.07 

(b) Total time and savings deposits. 639,061.34 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



$ 567,792.52 

. 591,061.34 

4,127.15 
. 60,089.40 



$1,223,070.41 



RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES 

Reserve for bad debt losses on loans (set up pursuant 

to Internal Revenue Service ruling 10,923 62 

TOTAL RESERVES ON LOANS AND SECURITIES.... 10,923.62 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 
Equity capital, total $ 179,996.54 



Common stock-total par value—,. 

(Number shares authorized 1,000) 
(Number shares outstanding 1,000) 

Surplus ; 

Undivided profits 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS., 



TOTAL LIABILITIES, RESERVES, AND 
CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



MEMORANDA 

Average of total deposits for the 1 5 calendar days 
ending with call date 

Average of tota] loans for the 15 calendar days 
ending with call date._ 



25,000.00 



- 60,000.00 
_ 94,996.54 
-$ 179,996.54 

-$1,413,990.57 



$1,222,225.08 
824,066.13 



I, Wilma L. Grant, Cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear 
that this report of condition is true and correct, to the best of my know- 
ledge and belief. 

Correct-Attest:^ WILMA L. GRANT 

Fred H. Hamilton, Will Waller, James E. Ransom, 
R. A. Stephenson, Asa M. Rouse, C. L. Renaker, Directors. 
State of Kentucky, County of Boone, ss: 

Swom to and subscribed before me this 18th day of January, 1971, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

Marie R. Vest, Notary Public 
vly commission expires September 23, 1971. 



Thu rsday, January 28, 1971 
Was It Sudden? 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Jerry Marcus 



•y 




Your Capitol and 
The New Congress 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 
■ U. S. Congressman 
4th District, Kentucky 







Athlete's Foot 

Athlete's foot is just itching 
to get a hold on your toes. A 
fungus disease which thrives in 
warm weather, it is a lot easier 
to get, than to get rid of. To 
prevent athlete's foot from get- 
ting a foothold, bathe your feet 
regularly, dry them well, dust 
powder between the toes, 
change your socks daily, and 
rotate your shoes. 




»*«M!&JMh 



;♦■.■•* tP^h™^ ^ 



Th 9 Tramta* SaMy Serv/ce "™to«»l"9* HmV 



Following too closely is a dangerous practice. 



NOTICE OF APPRECIATION 

We wish to thank all who attended the auction of Mrs. Emmitt I^e 
Harris on Saturday, January 9,Mg£l» 4 miles East of Owenton, Ky., m 
Owen County. Without all the good and contending bidders we would , 
not have had such a successful sale. Again, our thanks! 

MRS. EMMITT LEE HARRIS, Owner . 
Auctioneers: Paul Noel and W. D. Sullivan 
Cashier: Mrs. Ann Ennis Clerk: James Mosgrore 



50 BRAND NEW RECORDS $4.95 

(SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY BACK) 
You receive 50 brand new assorted 45 R. P. M. records at less than 10c 
each. These are not budget made but were made for high price sales. 
Elvis, Buck Owens, Dean Martin, James Brown. Great stars of today. 



"FOLKS— This is no gimmick. Just a fantastic offer and you make 
no promise to purchase future records. We just simply have 
millions of records that must be sold. _______ 



100 RECORDS $8.95—1000 RECORDS ONLY $75.00 

Larger volume prices on request. Orders post-paid except C. O. D. 

Any purchase enters your name in the "DECCO VACATION SWEEP- 
STAKES" or without a purchase you may enter by sending name and 
address. You may receive a vacation for two for 5 days of resort ac- 
commodations in beautiful Miami Beach. Dozens of vacations offered. 
Winners notified by mail. Vacations valued at over $165.00 each. Only 
one entry per family. Void where prohibited by law. 

DECCO RECORD COMPANY 



The occasion of returning to Wash- 
ington for the convening of the new 
Congress reminds me of what, a his- 
torian, Allan Nevins, has said about 
our Capitol He called it a place of 
resounding deeds. 

It is true. N o where can one find 
the ideals, the patriotism, the senti- 
ments, the purposes and the honored 
traditions of our country so nobly 
enshrined as in our Capitol. Itjs a 
symbol of the majesty of a grand and 
great land. It is both the heart of a 
nation and the foundation-head of our 
government. 

Our Capitol is the center from 
which radiates the people's authority, 
their power and their goodness. "We, 
the People," with the inspiration, the 
power and the promises of our Con- 
stitution are here ennobled to achieve 
the goals that prompt the respect and 
admiration of the world. 

It is the place that holds out hope 
for the less fortunate, gives assurance 
to the successful and promise to the 
ambitious. 

Within its historic walls the voice 
of the Republic has been heard— a 
voice that is still heard in the coun- 
try. It is the citadel of the basic 
freedom. It is the forum for repre- 
sentative government. 

Unfinished business of the 91st 
Congress, which finally adjourned less 
than 24 hours before it legally ex- 
pired, may get us off to a fast start 
if the President^ will prevails. 



The President, dissatisfied with the 
performance of the Senate, has indi- 
cated he will press his legislative pro- 
gram and that revenue sharing with 
the cities and states and welfare re- 
form will be his top priorities. 

He also stated he has decided a- 
gainst requesting any new taxes in 
1971. 




i Exercise 

Modern, technology has be- 
come so advanced that we 
Americans have become active- 
ly inactive. Automated living 
may be easy, but it also eases 

Sour muscles out of shape. oo 
egin an organized and prac- 
tical program of exercising to- 
day. You may select activities 
as vigorous as tennis, or as- 
limited as routine calisthenics 
and gardening. No matter what 
your age, exercise will improve 
your health. Ask your physi- 
cian's advice about the types 
and amount of exercise suited 
to your age, sex, and physical 
condition. Then get started to- 

Aav\ 





%/W 



|£ l glftfl»'iMM*IP ''V* M 



TEMPLE, GEORGIA 30179 



PHONE 562-3956 



Hungry Jacks 
Smorgasbord 




Plus Tax 



NOON 

NIGHT 

and 
SUNDAY 

20 SALADS 
6 DESSERTS 

You can't cook at home for these prices. Don't settle for a sandwich. 
Come, visit us for a full meal. Bring the entire family— Aunt Louise, 
Uncle Ralph, Grandma, Grandpa, and Cousin Martha. 



NOON 
NIGHT 

and 
SUNDAY 

10 HOT FOODS 
8 BEVERAGES 



8048 Dixie Highway 



371-8156 



Corner Industrial Road & Route 25 - Florence, Kentucky 

Open 7 Days FORMERLY OLD FARM Open 7 Days 




I 



CARLISLE'S 7^ KIDS 



OUR FUEL OIL- \> 
PEOPLE RECOMMEND, 
FOR THEY REGARD tT 
k AS A FRIEND 




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e LOCAL TRADEMARKS, 



COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
% ACRE 

— by — 

JOE CLAXON 

Agriculture is nou Nation's largest 
industry and certainly must be count- 
ed as one of the soundest and most 
essential segments of .our total econ- 
omy. Each year our growing pop- 
ulation requires increased amounts of 
food and natural fiber products. This 
means that farmers and ranchers have 
to expand the size of their opera- 
tions, untilize bigger and more experi- 
sixe equipment, build more and larger 
buildings, and incorporate the latest 
scientific and technological advances to 
increase their productivity. 

Yes, agriculture is a thriving, pros- 
perous and big business with a built- 
in growth factor. It is an industry es- 
sential to everyone. Like all modern 
businessmen, farmers and ranchers 
need capital to expand their opera- 
tions. Much of this capital is borro'w- 
ed. 

The Kentucky Feeder Calf Associ- 
ation completed its 15th year of op- 
eration in 1970. Thirty-eight sales 
were held In the spring, two In the 
summer and the remainder in the 
fall months. Gross income for the 
1970 sales amounted to $5,592,160, 
which was an increase in excess of one 
millon dollars over 1969. The num- 
ber of calves marketed through the 
special sales was up over 5,400 head. 
Price sreceived by producers were 
up $1.47 per hundredweight over '69 
and the highest overall average since 
the organization of the Kentucky 
Feeder Calf Association in 1955. The 
'70 sales average was $32.01 per 
hundredweight or $152.37 per head, 
for 476-pound average weight for all 
animals. Steer calves averaged $33.73 
per hundredweight, or $167.24 per 
head for 496-pound average weight. 
Heifer calves averaged $29.12 per 
hundredweight, or $129.46 per head 
for a 445-pound average weight. The 
18 sales grossed in excess of $150 per 
head, with a summer yearling sale 
averaging close to $200 per head. The 
market remained strong throughout 
the fall sales season even in view of 
the higher feeding costs projected for 
1971 resulting from corn blight. 



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Walton, Kentucky 



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A Modemly-Equipped Weekly Newspaper — Letter Press and Offset Printing Phone: 485-4962 

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Serving A Progressive Community — Boone, Kenton, Grant & Gallatin Counties jq c q 



Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 5 



City Proposes 
The Annexation of 
Adjoining Property 

The City Council of the City of 
Walton has proposed the annexation 
of property lying to the west and 
north of the existing city limits. Coun- 
cil members feel that with the antici- 
pated growth and development of the 
city, this property should be annexed 
and become a part of the city. This 
property is ideally located for resident- 
ial and/or industrial development. 
They (city council) have also stated 
that another objective is to provide 
construction of water and sewer lines. 
These facilities are not permitted out- 
side the corporate limits of the city. 

One of the largest parcels of land, 
165 acres, is located on the northwest 
city line of Walton and is bordered 
on the west by 1-75 and on the east 
by U. S. Highway 25. This farm is 
owned by Miss Mary West. 

Another farm containing 97 acres is 
on the north side of the West prop- 
erty and' also lies along U. S. 25. 
Only a small section of this land 
owned by Mrs. Savella Parker runs 
back to the 1-75 right-of-way. 

The property on both sides of the 
highway along U. S. 25 from the 
Parker farm to the south side of 
Chambers road has also been proposed 
for annexation. There are several dif- 
ferent parcels of developed residential 
dwellings included in this group which 
fronts on Chambers road and on the 
Dixie highway. 

The city also wishes to extend its 
territorial limits tojthe north along 
1-75 to the 1-71 right-of-way and along 
1-71 westwardly almost to Beaver road, 
thence on a broken diagonal line back 
to the present city limits. Several 
dwellig houses and a business are in- 
volved in this parcel of land. 

Still another parcel of land adjoins 
1-75 and Beaver and is included in 
the annexation plans. 

Last week in Boone Circuit Court, 
Mrs. Parker and Miss West filed for 
legal action to prohibit the annexation 
of their farms. A council member 
stated that Mrs. Parker had previously 
asked for consideration of a city water 
line to her property for a„ proposed 
subdivision. 

If the city of Walton does expand 
in the future to meet the challenge 
of population growth in southern 
Boone County, a move to the north 
and west seems most logical. On the 
east and southeast the city is con- 
tained by the Kenton County line. 

Twenhofel Junior High 
PTA to Meet Feb. 8th 

The Twenhofel Junior High School 
PTA will meet February 8th in the 
school cafeteria. Mrs. Virgil Rust, 
president, will preside. 

The program for the evening will 
consist of "Reflections of Yesterday, 
Today and Tomorrow," in observance 
of Founders' Day. 

The guest speaker will be Mrs. Judy 
Phillips, speech therapist. 

A Life Membership to the PTA 
will be presented to Mrs. Malcolm 
Fletcher, district chairman. A silver 
tea and refreshments will be served. 

Twenhofel was represented by Mrs. 
Wesley Hall, Mrs. Don Whiteker and 
Mrs. Curtis Noem at the Winter PTA 
Conference, held January 28 in Ft. 
Thomas. 

Spaghetti-Meatball Supper 

The public is invited to attend a 
meatball and spaghetti supper, sponsor- 
ed by the Married Couples Class of 
the Independence Christian Church. 

Serving will begin at 4:00 p. m., 
Saturday, February 13th, and continue 
until 8:00 p. m. Adults, $1.25, and 
children, 50 cents. The menu will 
consist of meatballs and spaghetti, 
French bread, tossed salad, homemade 
pie, and drink. 

Take your Valentine out for an 
enjoyable home-cooked meal. 

The woman lecturer was going 
strong, "For centuries women have 
been misjudged and mistreated," she 
yelled. "They have suffeicd in a 
thousand ways. Is there any way that 
women have not suffered?" "Yes, 
there's one way," a masculine voice 
retorted from the audience. "They 
have never suffered in silence!" 

Most men believe that a woman's 
place is in the home. They expect to 
find her there immediately after she 
gets off work. 



BOONE COUNTY HAS 
10 AREA CHAMPIONS 

Twenty-six Boone County 4-H pro- 
ject champions competed on Saturday, 
January 23, in the Northern Kentucky 
Area Project Record Competition. Of 
this nuihber, ^10 were selected Area 
Champions, and the Seniors are now 
eigible far state-wide competition The 
area champions and their projects were 
as follows: 

Beef, Susan Hetterman (junior); 
Clothing, Susan Hetterman (junior); 
Dairy, Parti Tupman (senior), and 
James Tupman (junior); Electric, Judy 
Hetterman (senior), Foods, Marianne 
Smith (senior); Home Furnishings, 
Marianne Smith (senior); Home Man- 
agement, Patti Strader (junior); Soil 
Conservation, Judy Kunkel (junior); 
Swine, James Tupman (junior). 

Wa-Na Club To Meet 

The Wa-Na Woman's Club will 
meet at the home of Mrs. Preston 
Art of 32 Catalina Drive., Walton, at 
8:00 p. m., Thursday, February 4. 

The program will be on "Ecology," 
and will consist of a group discussion. 

Promoted by Phone Co. 

Mrs. Betty L. Bentle of Frogtown 
Road, Walton, has been promoted to 
a service consultant in the "Traffic De- 
partment of Cincinnati Bell. 

She and her husband, Pete, a time 
study engineer for Cincinnati Mili- 
cron, have been living in this area 
for 10 years. They have one son, and 
attend the Florence Christian Church. 

All Saints School 
Board Has Meeting 

The Parish School Board of All 
Saints Church held its monthly meet- 
ing Monday, January 25, in the school 
library. 

Members present were: George W. 
Ryan, Father Harry Henhundfeld, Sis- 
ter Evelyn, Ed Walton, Sister Rita, 
Robert Kelly and Mrs. Richard Ryan. » 

.Robert Kelly was elected and wel- 
comed as a member of the board. He 
replaces Franklin Butler who, due to 
other commitments, could no longer 
serve on the board. 

A report was given that the paint 
ing of two rest rooms, kitchen and 
recreation area was completed during 
the Christmas vacation. 

The school has been visited by the 
State Fire Examiners, who gave a very 
favorable report. The secretary read a 
letter from the State Department of 
Public Safety commending All Saints 
on their safety program and their co- 
operation with the State safety rales. 

Other items of new and unfinished 
business, including teachers for the 
school year 1971-72, and building of 
storage cabinets in the recreation area, 
were discussed. 

Beechgrove Homemakers 

The Beechgrove Homemakers held 
their regular monthly meeting Jan. 21 
at the home of Mrs. Roy Kumler, 
with Mrs. Tom Ellis co-hostess. 

Members enjoyed a quiz given by 
Alice McHale on the lesson, Home 
Nursing. 

Members present were: Mrs. Ed- 
ward Andress, Mrs. Erwin Dewald, 
Mrs. Raymond Dickson, Mrs. Tom 
Ellis, Mrs. William Endres, Mrs. Wil- 
son Hall, Mrs. Virgil Kelly, Mrs. Roy 
Kumler, Mrs. William Letcher, Mrs. 
Raymond McHale, Mrs. Faye Powers, 
Mrs. John Mutsch, Mrs. William 
Scheper, Mrs. Anthony Schneider, 
Mrs. Vern Stephens, Mrs. Tony 
Sterbling, Mrs. William Wolsing, Mrs. 
Ernest Olson, and Mrs. Lloyd Spegal. 

The next monthly meeting will be 
held February 18 in the home of 
Mrs. James McHale with Mrs. Ray- 
mond McHale co-hostess. 

Get 71 License Tags Now 

Gov. Louie B. Nunn has urged 
Kentucky motorists not to delay ob- 
taining 1971 auto license tags, now 
on sale in offices of the County Court 
Clerk throughout the state. 

"I am advised by representatives of 
the Kentucky County Court Clerks' 
Association that extra staff personnel 
already are on duty to help motorists 
avoid the inconvenience of long lines 
and unnecessary delays traditional to 
the last-minute rush before the March 
1 deadline for purchases of the new 
license plates," Gov. Nunn said. 

Things are becoming so tense now- 
adays it's diffcult to find anyone a- 
sleep in church. 



Remedial Reading 
Supervisor Speaks 

Mrs. Pearl Bullock, Remedial Read- 
ing Supervisor, was guest ^speaker at 
the January meeting of the Kenton 
Elementary PTA. She discussed the 
causes of reading problems such as 
poor vision or hearing, brain damage, 
little or no exposure to books at 
home, etc. Poor reading can rob a 
child of his confidence and he is 
likely to seek attention in other ways, 
often becoming a discipline problem. 

She stressed the need for individual 
help for such children and told of a 
program . of volunteer mothers who 
give one morning each week to work 
individually with slow readers. Mrs. 
Bullock has been a teacher in this 
area for many years and is employed 
in her present capacity by the Fed- 
eral Government under Title I which 
provides Federal funds for special pro- 
jects in local school districts. 

During the business meeting, it was 
noted by the president, Mrs. Ray 
Baldwin, that the membership this 
year is the largest ill Kenton Elemen- 
tary's history, with 630 members. 

The classes of Mrs. Bailey, Miss 
Brown, Mrs. Popp, Mrs. Baird and 
Mrs. Holbrook were given $10.00 each 
for having 100 percent membership. 

IN TEXAS HOSPITAL 

Randall S. Wagner, a well known 
rural route mail carrier out of Inde- 
pendence, is now in Texas, where he 
in being treated for a serious illness. 
He would appreciate hearing from 
friends in this area, so here is his ad- 
dress: 

Randall S. Wagner 
M. D. Anderson Hospital 
6723 Bertner - Tumor Inst. 
Houston, Texas 77025 

50 Years In Eastern Star 

Walton Chapter, No. 161, Order of 
Eastern Star is planning Open House 
on February 4, at 7:30 p. m., in 
honor of Mrs. Mary Stephenson, who 
will be celebrating her 50 years as a 
member of the Eastern Star. 

All members and friends are invited 
to attend the presentation of her 50- 
year pin and to enjoy the refreshments 
which will be served. 

BURLEY SALES TO 
END IN KENTUCKY 

A final cleanup auction is scheduled 
for February 10 at the burtey tobacco 
market in Lexington. 

In last week's final sales sessions, 
three markets auctioned 2^208*350 lbs : 
of leaf at an average of $68.66 per 
hundred. 

Individual totals included Carroll- 
ton, 367,258 lbs. at $68.34; Lexing- 
ton, 1,699,788 lbs. at $68.82, and 
Shelbyville, 14,1304 lbs. at $67.63. 

The Kentucky Agriculture Depart- 
ment reported a season total of 402,- 
910,306 pounds sold at an average of 
$72.17 — well above last year's price. 

Jet Engine Mechanic 

S/Sgt. John A. Lucas has success- 
fully completed the Jet Engine Me- 
chanic Course at Chanute Air Force 
Base in Illinois. He was honor grad- 
uate and is assigned to the 39th Tac- 
tical Airlift Squadron, Lockbome Air 
Force Base, Columbus, Ohio. 

The sergeant is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph Lucas, Alta Vista Drive, 
Walton. 

Life for most people is a puzzle 
with a peace missing. 



a Simon Kenton Gro<i ^ Bearcats Take 

Crusaders, 55 to 50 



Gets National Attention 

A Simon Kenton High School grad- 
uate has gained national attention as 
a result of her work at Booth Hospital 
School of X-Ray Technology. 

Technical material and slides pre- 
sented at a recent state-wide meeting 
by Colleen McDonald have been re- 
quested by a New York drug firm for 
use in training programs for their rep- 
resentatives who call on other hos- 
pitals. 

The material is to be shown as an 
"excellent example" of good teaching 
practices. 

Richard Smith, director of Boorh 
x-ray school, is Miss McDonald's in- 
structor. The program is a two-year 
course and is accredited. 

MEMBERS ATTEND 
DISTRICT KFWC 

Mrs. Jack Rouse and Mrs. Asa M. 
Rouse, members of the Wa-Na Wo- 
man's Club, and Mrs. W. R. Belcher 
and Mrs. John Farrell, members of 
the Walton Woman's Literary Club, 
attended the Tuesday session of the 
l M*id-Winter Board Meeting of the 
KFWC at the President Motor Inn. 
Another Wa-Na Club member, Mrs. 
Daniel Hance, attended the Tuesday 
evening dinner and reception for the 
', speaker, Brig. Gen. Elizabeth Hoising- 
I ton, Director of the U. S. Women's 
: Army Corps, of Washington, D. C. 

! Mrs. Hance also served as a hostess. 

i 

The Wind Chill Index 

How much effect does the Northern 
breezes have in determining our wea- 
ther conditions? 

According to a wind chill table, it 

is colder when the wind blows. At 

25 degrees, a 5 mph wind reduces 

'the temperature to 21 degrees; a 10" 

mph breeze drops it to nine. 

When the thermometer registers 10 
degrees, a 10 mph wind reduced the 
reading (wind chill factor to -9. One 
encouraging thought is that wind 
speeds greater than 40 mph have lit- 
tle additional chilling effect. Br-r-r-r-r. 

Story On Drug Problem 

"Joy To the World— Don't You 
Believe It," a four-page feature story 
on the drug problem, originally print- 
ed in Cincinnati Bell's Bulletin mag- 
azine, is being made available to area 
clubs, organizations and schools. 

The bulletin is available from the 
Information Department, Cincinnati 
Bell, Room 200, 206 East 6th St., 
Cincinnati", Ohio 45^04. 

Two Gel 25-Year 
Pins from ULH&P 

Jesse W. Thornton and O. F. 
Young, both of Walton, recently 
completed 25 years service with The 
Union Light, Heat & Power Co., and 
received 25-year pins. 

Thornton is secretary and a member 
of the Walton Fire Department, a 
member of the Boone County Auxil- 
iary Police, and a Deputy Director of 
Boone County's Civil Defense. Mr. 
Thornton and his wife, the former 
Jean Craddock, reside at 116 North 
Main Street, and are the parents of 
two children, Candace and Charles. 

Young and his wife, Myrtle, reside 
on Old Verona Road, and are the 
parents of two daughters, Mrs. Patsy 
Penington of Independence, and Mrs. 
Judy Gilbert of Lexington. They al- 
so have seven grandchildren. 



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Traffic Safety 
Coordinating 
Committee 



Walton- Verona High School con- 
tinued its drive to replace St. Henry 
as champion of the Northern Kentuc- 
ky Independent Athletic Conference 
by upsetting the Crusaders, 55-50, last 
Friday night on the local floor. 

The loss was the first in nine league 
games for St. Henry and moved the 
second-place Bearcats closer with a 
5-1 league reeoord. On the season 
play, the Crusaders dropped to 15-5, 
while Walton-Verona won its 14th 
game in 22 starts. 

Walton trailed for the first half as 
St. Henry held an advantage in each 
of the first two w:riods. The Bear- 
cats pulled to a one-point deficit in 
the third period and scored 23 points 
in the final period for the victory. 

Ron Huffman with 20 and Mike 
Ferguson with 1 2 led W-V, while Bob 
Riesenbeck had 22 for St. Henry, Ir- 
win added 11 and Seiler 10. 

The preliminary game was also won 
by Walton-Verona. 

Simon Kenton 103, Ludlow 98 

Simon Kenton's Pioneers went over 
the century mark in defeating the Lud- 
low Panthers, 103-98, last Friday at 
Independence in the NKAC. It was 
the fifth conference win for the Pion- 
eers, who grabbed a 14-point first half 
lead and then held off the late rush 
of the Panthers. Ludlow was losing 
for the sixth time in 10 NKAC con- 
tests. 

Steve Leistner led the winners with 
31 points, and Tom Due added 18, 
Martin 19, Davis and Halderman 15 
v each. Mike Caple led Ludlow with 
35 and Jon Alig added 24. 

Simon Kenton also won the reserve 
game, 48-37. 

Bellevue 80— Walton-Verona 68 

Bellevue's Tigers halted a four-game 
winning streak of Walton-Verona by 
defeating the Bearcats, 80-68, last 
Tuesday at Bellcuve. The Tigers vir- 
tually settled the issue in the opening 
period by limiting the visitors to only 
one field goal, that by Bob Messmer, 
and four free throws by his teammates. 
The Bearcats were able to hold their 
own for the remainder of the game 
but the damage had been done. 

Church West led the Tigers in the 
scoring column with 22 points; Terry 
Ahrens added 19. Ron Huffman led 
Walton-Verona with 23 and Gary 
Ingram had 18, Rick Goldsberry 13. 

CovCath 95— Simon Kenton 59 

Covington Catholic found North- 
em Kentucky opposition a little easier 
than that of Louisville and ran over 
the Simon Kenton Pioneers, 95-59, 
last Tuesday at Covington. The Colo- 
nels placed 10 players in the scoring 
column and were never in trouble 
Coach Mote Hils took out his reg- 
ulars with 4:17 left in the third period 
and turned the game over to the re- 
serve five, who continued to out- 
score the visitors. Richard Derkson 
led the winners with 15 points; Top- 
miller, Rippe, and Wilcox each had 
13 points. Steve Leistner and Randy 
Davis each had 19 points for the 
Pioneers. 

"Have I told yon about my grand- 
children?" "No, and I appreciate it." 

Boy Drowns In Pond 

A Boone County youth drowned 
last Thursday in a small pond on the 
farm of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel E. Kroth, of Frogtown Road. 
Danny was nine years old and a fourth 
grade student at St. Paul School in 
Florence. 

The body was recovered about 11 
p. m. through the combined efforts 
of the Union Fire Department, Boone 
County Civil Defense, Water Rescue 
Unit, and Walton Volunteer Firemen 
Jesse Thornton, Ed Berkemeier and 
Charles Thornton. 

Only Two Fire Calls 

The Walton' Fire Department had 
only two runs during the past week. 
On Wednesday, they doused a grass 
fire on North U. S. 25, and on Mon- 
day afternoon were called to the Cecil 
Dickerson home, near Beaver, to ex- 
tinguish a small blaze around a chim- 
ney. Damage was negligible. 

Two married men were talking. One 
, said, "I'm perfectly happy. I have a 
wonderful home, a good job, and the 
finest wife in the country." The sec- 
ond one countered with, "Who 
wouldn't be happy with his wife in 
the country?" 







Burlington Couple To 
Head Cancer Crusade 

The William S. Jordres .of Burling- 
ton have. been reappointed co-chairmen 
of the 1971 Boone County Cancer 
Cnisade. 

"Their leadership in last year's C an ' 
cer Crusade resulted in Boone County 
exceeding the goal set by the Ameri- 
can Cancer Society," said Mrs. Ralph 
Pfalzgraf, president of the Boone Co- 
unty Chapter. 

Mr. Jordre is executive vice-president 
of the Oberle Jordre Construction of 
Cincinnati. 

The month of April is 'traditionally 
set aside as Cancer Crusade Month 
when volunteer workers canvass the 
homes of Boone County, distributing 
information on cancer detection and 
soliciting funds for research and treat- 
ment. 

Presides At Conference 

Noel Walton, senior partner of the 
firm of Walton& Walton, Civil En- 
gineers and Surveyors, Burlington, pre- 
sided over and moderated the Feb. 3 
morning session of the fourth annual 
Land Surveyors Conference, held at 
the Carnahan House Conference Cen- 
ter in Lexington. 

A long time respected member of 
his profession, Walton is presently 
serving as a member of the Commit- 
tee of Engineers in Surveying of the 
Kentucky Society of Professional En- 
gineers. \ 

The conference is not only design- 
ed to make late technical infoma- 
tion available to land surveyors, but to 
also afford an opportunity for discus- 
sion of problems of mutual interest to 
them. 

Southern States Meeting 

Approximately 90 members of the 
Southern States Cooperative's local 
board and committee members, agricul- 
tural workers and retail agency man- 
agers from this area, will attend a 
regional board meeting in Louisville, 
February 10th. The session will be 
held in the Brown Hotel, and regis- 
tration begus at 9:30 a. m. 

Those expected to attend the meet- 
ing from the Walton area are. Chris 
Combs, manager of Boone County 
Farm Supply; and local board mem- 
bers, Ralph E. Curry of Verona, Den- 
ny Jones of Walton, Elbert Menefee 
of Morning View, and Earl Jones, 
Ronald Vest and Kline Menefee, all 
of Crittenden. 

Lois Lay Member 
Of Sewing Board 

Miss Lois Ann Lay, a senior at 
Walton-Verona High School, will be 
one of 50 models on the Shillito Sew- 
ing Board, Monday night, February 8. 

She is the second Walton-Verona 
student to participate on the sewing 
board. 

During the semester she has attend- 
ed a meeting each Thursday afternoon 
at Shillito's, has modeled at two su- 
burban stores and at Shillito's down- 
town, Cincinnati. 

Lois will model a yellow formal 
with long sleeves and white embroid- 
ery trim. The garments made by the 
sewing board members will be judged 
by top people of the fashion world, 
and prizes will be awarded to the 
winners. 

Miss Peggy Garrison will be the 
Walton- Verona entrant on the spring 
sewing board. 

On Morehead Dean's List 

Morehead State University's fall 
semester Dean's List recorded the 
names of 1,477 persons, including 17 
students from Boone County. 

Local names and their standings — 
Hebron, Karen Barrett, 3.63, and 
William E. Dolwick, 3.00. Florence, 
Wanda Barrett, 3.57; Linda Bruce, 
3.81; Janice Cushman, 3.12; Gary T. 
Dearwater, 3.00; Diane Engles. 3.67; 
Lamont Garland, 3.80; Robert Guil- 
laume, 3.25; Billy Humphries, 3.20; 
Michael Meinze, 3.80; Sandra Miller, 
3.06; Vicki Otten, 3.93; Dennie Lee 
Taulbee, 3.63, and Nelda Williams, 
3.38. Union, Sandra G. Stephenson. 
3.06. Walton, Sandra L. Stephenson, 
3.56. 

7th Grade Tournament 
At Ockerman, Florence 

There is a 7th grade basketball 
tournament in progress at Ockerman 
Junior High School, Florence, this 
week. 

The Walton-Verona 7th grade was 
in action Wednesday night. A win 
would put them in the semi-finals on 
Friday night. The finals will be play- 
ed Saturday night. 

The W-V team is coached by Steve 
Stacey and assisted by "Shorty" Coyle. 
Their record is 8 wins, 1 loss. 



Two youngsters were walking home 
from Sunday school after having been 
taught a lesson about the devil. One 
of the boys said to the other, "What 
do you think about that devil stuff?" 
The other thoughtfully replied, "Well, 
you know how Santa Claus turned 
out— he's probably Just your Dad." 



f«K 



Thursday, February 4, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 

Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 • Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 

Assistant Editor 

Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch. Foreign Rate, 6c Per Line. 




Sympathy is extended to Mrs. Jane 
Sleet and Evan Hance of Walton, and 
to Mrs. WHlella Gardner of Carlisle, 
in the death of their brother D. D. 
Hance, in Florida. 

Mrs. Beulah Smith of South Main 
Street is in St. Elizabeth Hospital and 
will undergo major surgery this week. 

Miss Wilma Goode of Edwards 
Ave., who has had surgery at Booth 
Hospital, has returned home and is 
getting along nicely. 

Sympathy is extended to Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth Jorjes in the death of her 
brother, -Harry Simpson, of Williams- 
town. Services were held there last 
Wednesday. __ 

Sympathy is extended to the family 
of Rcamy Simpson, who died at the 
Woodspoint Nursing Home, Florence, 
Sunday afternoon. ^— / 

Mrs. Edith Hamilton and Mrs. 
Mary Stephenson entertained on Sun- 
day for dinner, Mrs. Melvin Utley, 
Doug and Sharon Utley, Mrs. Lee 
Naive, and Mrs. Lil Young. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Heeger and 
family of Groton, Conn., were visiting 
with relatives and friends at Fiskburg, 
the past week. He is. a Warrant Of- 
ficer, and career man in the U. S. 
Navy and is stationed at the big 
Naval Sub Base, New London, Conn. 
He and his wife (the former Marjorie 
Bridges) are graduates of Simon Ken- 
ton High School, Independence. 

Sympathy is extended to Albert 
Rosenstiel of Walton, Route 2, in 
the death of his sister, Mrs. Minnie 
Walthers of Falmouth. Services were 
held there last Thursday. 

Mrs. Woodrow Greene spent Sun- 
day afternoon with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Henry, of Warsaw. 
Mr. Henry has been quite ill the past 
week 

The WSCS of the Walton United 
Methodist Church will meet Friday 
night, February 5. All members are 
urged to be present. 

CARD OF THANKS . . . 

Thanks to everyone for the cards, 
food, flowers, and visits while I was 
in the hospital and at home. Your 
thoughtfulness is deeply appreciated. 
lt-5c GENEVIEVE MURPHY 



Mrs. Ruth Smith was called to 
Lawrenceburg, Ind., last week due to 
the death of her cousin, Russell Beach. 

John Gault, II, and John Gault, III, 
and Elizabeth Arnold were weekend 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. John Gault 
of Nicholson Road. 

Lewis Ryle is a patient in Booth 
Hospital. His room number is 410. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward .Duncan of 
Iowa, spent last Tuesday with her 
sister, Mrs. Woodrow Greene, and on 
Friday, another sister, Mrs. Frances 
Townsend, of Warsaw, spent the day 
with her. 

Mrs. Bert Parker entertained Thurs- 
day with a luncheon for Rev. and 
Mrs. A. J. Russell and Mrs. Walter 
Whitson.. 

Stony Ingram is recuperating from 
surgery at Booth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Fryman and 
son entertained Sunday for Mr. and 
Mrs. Elton Tierbesield and daughters, 
Joann and Helen, and Mr. and, Mrs. 
Denny Fields, all of Covington, in 
honor of Terry Fryman's 17th birth- 
day. 

Sympathy is extended to the family 
of Gerald Roland. 

Mrs. Robert Yates spent the week- 
end with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Simpson, of Lexington. Mrs. 
Simpson is ill with a heart condition. 

BEAVER LICK 

Mrs. Bertha Jack is still on the 
sick list, but is slowly improving. 

Alva Crouch is being kept busy 
lately trying to keep everybody in 
shoes since the snow began to fall. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Rosenstiel and 
Mr. and Mrs. Gene Stephenson at- 
tended the funeral of Albert's sister, 
Mrs. Minnie Walthers of Falmouth, 
on Thursday. 

Kevin Collins is still on the sick 
list. He was taken to the doctor a- 
gain today. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crouch were awaken- 
ed early Friday morning by their son. 
Butch, just getting in from Texas 
for a few days leave. 

Mr. McCubbin surely had a bad 
day for his funeral — snow was on the 



YES 



We have small acreage tracts for sale, located on 

mm 

LLL Highway at Fiskburg; Brown Road at Verona; 
Cleek Lane at Beaver, and near Interstate at 
Crittenden. 

Gayle — 

McElroy 

Realty 

33 Alto Vista Drive 

Walton, Kentucky 
■^\ ^\^ Phone: 485-4297 



S 

■ 





4T> 

©M FEB.3,1161 SNOW PELTED 
THE EAST COAST FROM NEW VORK 
TO WORTH CAROLINA. FOR THE 
FIRST TIME IN HISTORY ALL 

VEHICLES EXCEPT FOR , 

EMERGENCIES-- WERE BANNED 
FROM NEW YORK. STREETS. 



■«/— > 



KJlTHOUT Q80UND TRANSPORTATION A 
BARREL OF ELECTRIC EELS DESTINED 
FOR A CONEV ISLAND AQUARIUM WAS 
STRANDED AT A NEW YORK AIRPORT. 

* * *;*to,u„i,r. KM 



,%iii^J^ 





^T CAPE COD, ELECTRICAL 
REPAIRMEN TRAVELED 
- ON SKIS TO MAKE 
NEEDED REPAIRS. 



KoADS AND WALKWAYS BECAME 
IMPASSABLE DURING THE STORM. 
MAKIV COMMUNITIES AND 
INDIVIDUAL HOMEOWNERS NOU)^ 
USE A MIXTURE OF CALCIUM 2-1 
CHLORIDE AND SALT TO MELT 
SNOUl AND ICE FAST. .—...•-- 




ground and still snowing. 

Bro. Vaugh has been on the sick' 
list now for over a week. All wish 
him a speedy recovery. 



BIRTHS 



Born to Dewey and Lana Mulford, 
6715 Curtis Way, Florence, a son, at 
2:20 p. m., January 27, at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital. The Mulfords are 
former Walton residents. 

Pfc. David D. Eddins and wife, the 
former Barbara Dean, are the proud 
parents of a baby daughter, born on 
January 21 and weighing 7 pounds, 
13V2 ounces. Their address is: 608 
2nd Ave., Apt. 4, Asbury Park, N. J. 
07712. 

A daughter, Amy Lynn, weighing 
9 pounds, 7 ounces, was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. James Ward, of Cincinnati 
(formerly of Walton). The grand- 
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Emmett 
Ward and Mr. and Mrs. Glen Cox, 
Walton. The Wards have *a son, 
Todd, and another daughter, Tracy. 
Mr. Ward is a policeman in Cincin- 
nati. 

JUNIOR CLASS HAM 
DINNER, FEBRUARY 5 

The junior class of Walton-Verona 
High School will have a ham dinner 
Friday, February 5, starting at 5:30 
p. m. The menu will consist of ham, 
sweet potatoes, green beans, salad, and 



dessert. Tickets are on sale from any 
member of the class. Adults, $1.15, 
and children, 65 cents. At the door, 
the cost will be $1.25 for adults, and 
75 cents for children. 

The juniors invite you to be pres- 
ent and enjoy a good dinner. 



Candid Weddings 

Color & Black & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, Walton 
485-4046 



», »n>«il)ii[ll>r :ij! 




DISCOVER THE 

BIG DIFFERENCE 



IN LOW- COST AUTO 
INSURANCE 

You do uvi money with our 
Special Budget Automobile 
Policy. What's more, you get 
quality protection and 
hometown agency service 
. . . service you can count 
•n at ail times. 

These plus benefits add up 
la a big difference for you. 

Call er wrha us today for 
full facts. 

J. B. JOHNSON 

93 North Main Street 

WALTON, KY. 

485.7102 



FjMOh 



REPRESENTING 

/^AffTOMOBILE MUTUAL 
/INSURANCE COMPANY 
HOME OFFICE* COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Kami 



nnnm«»n<l»imminimtmm 






UNION 



Emma Jlhe Ryle and Danny Aylor 
went to Columbus, Ohio, on Sunday, 
Jan. 24, to see her brother. They 
went via Norwood*, Ohio, picked up 
Edith Black and daughter, Toni Gail, 
and took them along. 

Mrs. Clarence McCane entered St. 
Elizabeth Hospital and had major 
surgery Tuesday. She is doing nicely. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Aylor, Todd and 
Nita, were Sunday dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Omer Black. Terry 
Jones, Julana Beil, Marilyn McCor- 
mack, Nancy Weller and Kathy And- 
rews of Big Bone Baptist Church 
called Sunday afternoon and brought a 
recording of a complete worship at 
the church to play for Mr. Black, be- 
cause he isn't able to attend church. 

Kenny Aylor was a dinner guest of 
his mother, Mrs. Bruce Ryle, on Mon- 
day and Wednesday. 

Miss Jane Bristow and Mrs. Omer 
Black went to Covington, Friday after- 
noon to do a little shopping. 

Our sympathy is extended to the 



families of John Rich and Howard 
McCubbin, who were buried here at 
Big Bone Cemetery last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Turner and 
family visited the Donald Parks fam- 
ily of Cincinnati, recently. 

Mr. ad Mrs. Denny Kirb/s week- 
end guest was her brother, Clinton. 
Slover, of Cincinnati. 

Miss Brenda Lou Neil attended a 
birthday party at Bro. Mullins, of 
East Bend, «for his daughter, Becky, 
on Friday. 

The Gilbert Turners attended a 
birthday party for Wm. Polley, Fri- 
day. . , 
^-The Big Bone Baptisfquartet of 
Terry Jones,. Kenny Jones, Bobby W. 
Ginn and Joe H. Beil went to Rich- 
mond, Ky., Friday to the Area Youth 
meeting and sang. On Thursday night 
they sang at Harrison, Ohio, and Mrs. 
Mabel Beil and daughter, Julana, went 
along. 

Bro. and Mrs. James Wilson call- 
ed on his sister Mrs. Mabel Beil, on 
Thursday. They are from Visalia, Jim 
being pastor there. 



TRULY HOMELIKE 



A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 



Independence, Ky. 
356-2673 



-SERVING ALL FAITHS— 



COL. KENNER'S 

Appliance Co. 

5980 Taylor Mill Road Oak Ridge 
Phone 356-5440 



~o- 



Admiral Electric Cooking Stoves 

30 Inches Wide with Drawer, Hinged Cooking Surface, 
Plug In Surface Unit, Lift-Off Door _._ $167.95 

30 Inches Wide, Hinged Cooking Surface, Plug-In Sur- 
face Units, Lift-Off Oven Door, Built-in Oven Light, 
Window Door, Lighted Control Panel, Minute Re- 
minder, Automatic Oven Timer, Timed Convenience 
Outlet . . $1 97.95 

These Stoves Have Many More Quality Features! 
Color— $3.50 Extra 



Coleman Gas & Oil Healing Stoves 

GAS, 55,000 BTU, heats 3-5 rooms. .$131.00 

OIL, 35,000 BTU, heats 1-3 rooms $94.85 

—Installation Extra — 

OpeYi Monday thru Wednesday, 1 a. m, to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m. 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 




COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERVICE! 




Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for You — 

Nie's Pharmacy 

LLL Highway between Independence and Nicholson 



SMALL CHANGE TURNS 
INTO BIG MONEY 
AT GENERAL- 



Steady saving makes small sums 
mount up to big money. Thanks 
to our higher rates ... of divi- 
dends, compounded regularly . . . 
your money earns even more. 



the first la Kentucky 





GENERAL 
SAVINGS 




.'Mill 



INSURED 



the general savings and loan association, #/ic. 

6th & Madibon, Covington, Ky. - 291-7219 4501 Dnde Highway, Elsmerc, Ky. • 341-4848 



% p* 



< 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 4, 197? 



20 Years Ago . 



Thursday, February 1, 1951 
"WALTON— 

Mrs. Lebus Stephenson was hostess, 
to the Jean Bach Circle of the Wal- 
ton Baptist Church, last Thursday. 

William Edward Hankinson, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hankinson, Walton, 
■was one of the ten junior students 
■who were listed on the honor roll for 
the fall term at Transylvania College, 
Lexington. - 

The young people of the Walton 
■Christian Church entertained their 
parents and guests, C. W. Ransler, 



♦ae 



Rev. Gravely, Rev. T. J. Liggett, and 
James Spencer with a fellowship sup- 
per in the church basement Sunday 
evening, January 28th. The 1951 
officers are Johnny Grubbs, president 
rrank Penick, Jr., vice president; 
Glenna Allphin, secretary; and Mary 
Howard, treasurer. 

Cpl. Wilbur L. Morehead, ., son of 
Mrs. Martha Morehead, Walton, R-2, 
has been awarded the Bronze Star 
award. 

Mrs. William Breeden and Mrs. 
Leo Flynn are attending the Home- 




Another grand farm machinery 
exposition ... the best in a 
five state area ... is in the 
making. Visit the booths of our 
225 exhibitors, get the latest 
data on farming techniques 
and methods . . . see today's 
innovations in farm equipment. 
68% of the Nation's popula- 
tion lives within a day's drive 
from the Kentucky Fair & Ex* 
position Center in Louisville. 
Make a date now. Remember, 
too, your free ticket stubs are 
good for a prize-a-day drawing, 
plus a color-TV grand prize. 



10-13 

9:00 am - 5:30 pm 

jjOrder Your Free Tickets 
Now from Your Farm 
Implement Dealer or 
from NFMS. 




Don't miss the tractor pulling champion- 
ships in World Famous Freedom Hall 
Five Contest Classes (One Hot Rod Class) 
TWO NITES. 7 P.M. 
FEB. 10 I FEB. 11 
Admission will be charged for 
Tractor Pull only. 



'^ww^^www^mwww'.w 



NATIONAL FARM MACHINERY SHOW TICKET* ^ 
Bex 21179, Louisville, Kentucky 40221 »', 

(502) 366-9592 V^JJS-K 



makers' Convention in Lexington, this 
week. 

Mrs. Wendell Rouse spent the week 
in Lexington with her son, Asa M., 
who is attending UK. 

The Walton Parent-Teachers Asso- 
ciation has named the following home- 
room mothers: Mrs. Earl Waters, first 
grade; Mrs. O F. Young, second 
and third grades; Mrs. Charles Steers, 
third and fourth; Mrs. J. B. Stephen- 
son, fifth grade; Mrs. William Locke, 
sixth ; Mrs. Ralph Carpenter, seventh 
and eighth; Mrs. Leonard Cook, ninth; 
Mrs. Wallace K. Grubbs, tenth; Mrs: 
Louis Schwab, eleventh; and Mrs. 
Kenneth Johnson, Sr., twelfth grade. 
INDEPENDENCE— 

The Kenton County Garden and' 
Cultural Club held its January meeting 
at the Independence Christian Church 
with Mi?. William Brown as hostess. 

"Bobbie" McGraw, serving Uncle 
Sam in Washington, D. C, has en- 
joyed a ten-day furlough at home, and 
has returned to duty. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cox of Inde- 
pendence were delightfully surprised 
Sunday .when a houseful of relatives 
came to see them. 

Kenton County Homemakers sent 
fifteen delegates to the Farm-Home 
Convention being held this week at 
the University of Kentucky. 
BANK LICK— 

Miss Betty Cloe Black spant Satur- 
day night with her aunt and Uncle, 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Barth called 
on her mother, Mrs. Joe Besterman, 
Friday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Moore and 
son spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
John Hopperton and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Sparks and 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Woods and son 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation fir Repair 

Precast Cisterns and 

Backhoe Work. 



*■'. % 




were calling in Beaver on Friday even- 
ing. 

Master Dennis Kelly arjd sister, 
Linda Sue, spent one day recently with 
.their grandparents. 

FLORENCE— ~~~ 

Billy Noel of Dixie Highway enter- 
tained Saturday evening with a party 
for" members of his graduating class. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Lucas of Russell 
Street are receiving congratulations up- 



VERONA 

Flonnie Edrington, Reporter 

.Mr. and Mrs. James Bush and son, 
Aaron, of Crossplains, Ind., entertain- 
ed at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Buddy Overbay, with a birth- 
day dinner January 23, in honor of 
their son, Aaron, who was one year 
old. Those present to enjoy the na,p- 
py occasion were: Mr. and Mrs. Jim 
Elliston of Verona, Mr. and Mrs. 
Tom Johns and Cathy of Warsaw, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ernest Kinman of Warsaw, 
Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Wiley and Kevin 
of Lawrenceburg, Ind., and Lindsey 
Brashear. Aaron received many gifts, 
and a good time was had by all. All 
left wishing him many more happy 
birthdays. 

John Rich passed away sometime 
last Saturday night from a heart attack. 
He was found Sunday morning by 
his brother, Harry Rich. We extend 
our sympathy to his children and the 
other relatives in his passing. 
• Mrs. Flossie Greenwell of Erlanger, 
was visiting Mfia^rWff^^rSjFred Ham- 
ilton and children la°st weekT 

Mrs. Allie Chandler went to v». her 
brother, Robert Jones, last Sunday, 
who is in the hospital suffering from 
a hearty attack. He is doing ( fine and 
expects to go home soon. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We wish to thank those who sent 
cards, gifts and came to help us cele- 
brate our Golden Wedding Anniver- 
sary. 

MR. & MRS. GEORGE SHELTON 
Owenton, Kentucky It- 5* 

ALERT today, ALIVE tomorrow! 



on the arrival of a baby son. are the proud parents of a baby 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira V. Smith returned daughter, bom at St. Elizabeth hosp. 
Sunday from a two weeks vacation Mr. and Mrs. Roy C. Lutes attend- 
in Florida. t ed Cox Theatre to see "I Know My 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Shoemaker Love" in Cincinnati the past week. 



B. C. &D» 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 



ON TV 




FOR SALE— FAT HENS 

Fill your deep freeze. Cheapest 
meat these is — 50c on foot. 

ARTHURS EGG FARM 

Dry Ridge, Ky. Phone 824-4793 



EMBERTON 

^E™ OF KENTUCKY TODAr"! 




Friday, U.25 P- 25 p . m . 

Friday, 5:°0 P- nl " 3ai u . 25 a . m. and 

5:55 p^'^s^rsSrS eR 

KENTUCKY'S gOV ^°? orTO N, TREASURER. 



ABSOLUTE 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1971 



10:00 A. M. 



To settle the estate of the late Earlie and Eula Crouch, located 8 Miles West of Dry Ridge Exit of 1-75 and 
14 Miles East of Owenton, on Taft Highway, Grant County, Ky. Good school system, new hospital, Eagle Creek 
Country Club, and many other forms of recreation add to pleasure of Grant County. 

The heirs and assigns have contracted with us to sell all their real estate and personal property to the highest 
bidder on date and place above described. 

INVESTMENT PROPERTY -These following described tracts are in the heart of "Proposed Eagle Creek 
Reservoir." This is your opportunity to purchase before completion of reservoir and before prices go up. 

(1) 67 acres, more or less, known as Crouch's Place. Beautiful Eagle Creek winds through these fertile bot- 
toms adding beauty, recreation, good hunting, fishing, and beauty to wooded areas. This has been "Heaven On 
Earth" to many. Irrigation is no problem here. A six-room home with bath and partial basement; also 4-room 
house (hardwood floors), bam (combination dairy, tobacco and hay), tool shed. 

(2) 135 acres with 5-bent barn and stripping room, 4-room house (partial basement), all buildings under 
good metal roof; on Taft Highway (No. 22) at Eagle Creek. 

(3) 26 acres, known as Aunt Lois Crosswaite farm; large pond, good line fence; Mt. Pisgah Road (Eagle and 
Stephens Creek). 

(4) Six acres (more or less), Route 22 (Taft), ideal location for business site, home or trailmobae; cistern; 
bus route, mail route, school bus, and within walking distance of church and store. 

The total tobacco allotment is 2.04 acres and 18 acres feed and grain allotment. The individual farm allot- 
ments will be determined by ASC committee. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY— Living room suite (2-piece), one nice bedroom suite (good condition), one older 
bedroom suite, odd beds, dinette set, GE refrigerator, Frigidaire electric stove, gas and wood range, 2 kitchen 
cabinets, Admiral TV (black and white, UHF, good condition), Siegler oil heating stove, 250-gallon ofl tank, 
dishes, pots, pans, silverware. 

FARM MACHINERY— 46-B John Deere tractor (new Tear tires), John Deere two-way plows, New Holland 
pickup baler with motor, cutoff saw for tractor, McCulloch chain saw, John Deere manure spreader, iron-wheel 
wagon, 2 cane mills with evaporator pan, hammermill, hay conveyor, 1,000-gal. water tank, horse-drawn equipment. 

One 1955 IVi-ton Chevrolet truck with cattle racks and grain racks. 

These properties may be seen any time by an appointment before auction date. The farms will be offered for 
sale at 1:00 P. M. The four tracts will be offered individually^ then thev will be grnnpfd to p«*>tw> highest bid. 

TERMS— Cash for personal property; 10% of sale price down payment on sale date with balance within thirty 
days (with deed) on real estate. 



LUNCH WILL BE SERVED. 



Not Responsible For Accidents 



LUTHER CROUCH, Administrator - Phone 823-1421 
COLSON ALTMAN, Auctioneer & Sales Manager - 824-6466 

"DOODLE" BOBB, Auctioneer 
WILENA P(TRIE, Real Estate Broker - 823-8331 



*s 



Thursday, February 4, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



FIRST-OF-THE-MONTH CLEARANCE 



Girls' Sweaters $2.00 Up 

1 Group Ladies' Sweaters $4.00 

Ladies' Flannel PJ's One-Third Off 
Entire Stock Ladies' Hats. .... Only 25c 

Fish Net Hose...... Only 25c Pair 

1 Group Ladies' Dusters $2.00 

Knit Children's Vests. Special $4.88 



Valentines, Valentine Napkins, Plates 
and Centerpieces by Gibson 

All Costume Jewelry One-Third Off 

Benton -Bonar 

65 N. Main St., Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4495 



1 Group of Permanent Press * 
Shifts.. Only $2.00 

Entire Stock Ladies' Skirts 1-3 Off 

3 Only, Men f s Top Coats $7J7 

1 Group Men's White Shirts .only $2.00 

Boys' Sweaters Special .... 1-3 Off 

Men's Pull-Over Sweaters 1-2 Price 




Home 
Agent's 
Party 
Line 

By 

Nancy Norman 



For women, boots are the import- 
ant fashion accessory this season. And 
for children, boots beat rain, snow, 
slush, and cold weather. By choosing 
carefully, you can have Smart looks 
and easy care in today's leg-accented 
scene. Certainly, it's never been more 
important to keep boots looking store- 
fresh. *And the easiest avenue*to soft 
sheen is suds-cleanable boots. 

Echoing the fashion theme . in 
shoes, boots are more elegant, leg- 
loving, and sleek; designed in styles 
for rough-and-tumble, casual, and for 
dressy wear. The most popular seem 
to be knee-high which can be worn 
with any skirt length and with pants. 
But the newest look is the lower midi 
boot. There are front and said lac- 
ings, zippers and expandable gores, 
stretch leather-looks and shiny crush- 
ed patents. Tour a shoe store or de- 
partment to see the many styles and 
colon for dawn-to-dark activties. 

Fashion boots are made most often 



of leather or vinyl. Winter boots are 
pile or foam lined for warmth. For 
fall and springs, boots are lined with 
nylon tricot or light-weight cotton or 
nylon fleece. There are also rubber or 
molded vinyl over-the-shoe boots — al- 
ways waterproof for wet weather wear. 

To avoid possible disappointment, 
know the difference between water- 
proof and water repellent and ask 
questions before buying. Many of the 
handsome, high-style boots will resist 
splashes or damp pavement but can- 
not be expected to keep feet dry in 
puddles or snow. The secret is in con- 
struction. Boots that are cut and 
sewn, whether leather or vinyl, are not 
waterproof unless seams have been 
sealed. In addition, leather itself must 
be treated to gain water repellancy or 
^waterproof properties. Leather boots 
are cut and sewn, a method which al- 
lows greater detailing. Leather also has 
built-in breathability for comfort, a 
rich texture and beautiful grain. 

Boots of vinyl may be molded from 
a single piece which automatically 
makes them waterproof. Vinyls simu- 
late leather grains and textures from 
smooth to crushes to reptile. When 
boots are made from sheet vinyl in- 
stead of the molding process, they are 
constructed like leather boots, have 
greater detailing, but require special 
tape for waterproofing. 

Boots can enhance or ruin general 
appearance. Good looks depend on 



RATES OF WALTON ADVERTISER 

Local Display™.. '"Trr^- 60c per colunhn inch 

Foreign Display. (6c per line) 84c per column inch 

Mats or Plates — Deadline Monday Noon 

Classified Ads, Cards of Thanks. 50c minimum 

(2c per word if in excess of 25 words) — Payable In 
Advance. No Phone Calls. Deadline Tuesday, 10 a. m. 

Legal Advertising ; — $1 .00 per column inch 

—OFFICE HOURS— 

Monday-Friday— "...-8 a. m. to 12 noon, 12:30 to 4:30* 
Social News Deadline 12:00 Noon, Monday 

Phone 485-4962 



establishing a regular routine-rafter 
wear a little care — especially in wet or 
snowy weather. Vinyl boots and those 
of other man-made materials should 
be wiped clean with a sudsy sponge 
and dried with a cloth. Today's 
leather boots have special finishes 
to keep them soft and flexible. These, 
too, may be cleaned with a sudsy 
sponge. Then rinse with a clean, 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20th 



10:00 A. M. 



At the farm of Mr. & Mrs. Richard Turner, Cason Lane off Sherman-Mt. Zion Road (Fred Ecklar Farm Owner). 
If coming South; take 1-75 to Crittenden Exit; then U. S, 25 to Sherman; if coming North, take 175 to Dry 
Ridge Exit, then U. S. 25 to Sherman. 



Sherman, Ky., Grant County 



Mr. & Mrs. Turner are leaving this' farm and will sell, on the above date— 

TRACTORS, EQUIPMENT, CATTLE— 1969 Farmall 756 diesel tractor with big tires, 3-point hitch, 2 right 
and left hydraulic valves, also with power steering, power brakes, deluxe seat, rear Weights, independent take-off, 
also 1,000 rpm, 100" axle— bought new Oct. 2, 1969; 1970 444 Farmall tractor (gas), live power, power steering, 
differential lock, auxiliary valve for remote cylinder with bumper, plus Freeman front loader, stay bar adjustable, 
to be sold as a unit together— bought new April, 1970; 1952 Farmall Super H recently overhauled, with new head, 
also has extra low gear; all tractor equipment listed below will be sold separately and will not be grouped with 
tractors— 3-point hitch I. H. (No. 411), 4-bottom 14-inch plows (like new), spring trip beam, Holland tobacco 
setter (fits I. H. A, 100 or 140), Woods B-114 rotary mower (9Vi-ft cut pull type), 3-point hitch I. H. 2-row 
com planter, I. H. rubber tired wagon with new 8x16ft. flat bed, lV^-ton trailer with 750x20 tires, 3-point 
hitch 2-barrel boom 21 -ft. spray. 1954 G Allis Chalmers tractor with motor in tear, cultivators, plow, sickle 
bar and rotary mower underneath all work on hydraulic lift — to be old for a neighbor, Mr. Lovelace. 

Forage Harvester Equipment includes New Holland Super 717 with 9 knives, 1969 model, used Wa com seasons, 
Fox blower (power take-off) with long hopper, used 2 years with pipe for 35' silo, extra pipe, distributor buckets, 
new elbow, ropes and pulleys, 2 New Holland wagons with rubber tires and self unload, also electric unload, 700 
pounds front end weight and bracket that fits 544, 656, 756 or 856, new 50-ft. endless 6-in. rubber belt, Champ- 
ion tobacco spray, 275-galIon water tank, 20-ft. hay elevator and motor, 7-ft. I. H. pull type disk, power take-off 
water pump, cow clippers, aluminum electric heater, Warm Morning stove, log chain, many tractor and plow 
parts, electric grinder; DeLaval milker, sterling type, floor model with extra bucket. 

30 head of Holstein cows, heifers and one bull; seven of these cows range in age from 4 to 9 years, balance are 
3 years and under, heifers range in age, 9 months to 2 years, some heifers are bred, some open— there are 16 
cows milking now and milk was weighed Jan. 13—2 cows gave 67 to 73 lbs., 1 cow gave 58 lbs., 8 cows gave 
from 40 to 46 lbs., and 5 cows gave 34 to 39 lbs.; yearling Holstein buB— TB and Bangs tested. 



TERMS: CASH 



Sale Conducted By 



t 



(0L. CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

REALTORS-AUCTIONEERS-APPRAISERS 






4 East Southern Avenue, Covington, Ky. 

Phone 431-4222 Anytime 
"If You Have Anything \o Sell— Call Us" 



AUCTIONEERS 



Main Street, WiUiamstown, Kentucky 

823-1611, If no answer, dial "O^and ask. for 

(no charge) Enterprise 42*22 

t 

COL, CECIL WAYMAN b REL a WAYMAN 

! \ 1 



damp cloth and wipe dry. Scuffs may 
be minimized with shoe polish or ap- 
plication of paste wax. It is especially 
important to clean boots after walking 
through rock-salt used on icy pave- 
ments. Unless taken care of prompt- 
ly, rock-salt will discolor boots. 

Over-the-foot boots for children are 
becoming more and more popular for 
winter warmth. Usually made of the 
molded vinyl in pull-on or zipper 
styles, winter ones are pile-lined. Dec- 
oratve— pile cuffs or knitted leg-hug 
ging tops provide extra warmth and 
discourage snow slipping over the top. 
Ample gussets behind zipper and the 
other closures are added protection 
from cold and wetness. 

Over-the-shoe boots of rubber or 
molded vinyl, close with a zipper, a 
strap-plus-gusset, or have an extra 
wide top with loop and button or 
adjustable strap. Getting boots on and 
closed can be a source of great frus- 
tration for nursery and kindergarten 
age children. R ubbing a bar of soap 
up and down inside the back helps 
shoes slide in. If the child can man- 
age it, a plastic bag put over the 
shoe first provides better sliding power 
than rubber heels. 

Children's boots respond quiekly to 
suds care and should be given fre- 
quent attention since children tend to 
be rough on footwear. Boots should 
be cleaned inside from time to time 
and crevice tool of a vacuum clcaper 
is ideal for this In spite of precau- 
tions, snow-time fun usually means 
snow inside the boots. If boots are 
really soaked, blot up moisture with 
paper towels or clean cloths. Then 
insert the hose of a hair dryer into the 
top and blow the pile dry. This will 
make the boots ready for wear in a 
short time and prevents odor build- 
up from long periods of wetness. 

COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
Vi ACRE 

-by- 
JOE CLAXON 

Burley tobacco is greatly influenced 
by fertilization practices. Both yield 
and quality may be improved by using 
adequate amounts of the proper nutri- 
ents. Soils differ in their productive 
capacity and in their fertility level. 
; Consequently, attention should be giv- 
en to the phyical and chemical char- 
acteristics of the soil in deciding up- 
on the amount of fertilizer to use. 
Soil tests and previous cropping his- 
tory are helpful guides in estimating 
fertilizer and lime needs for- specific 
fields. 

Control of soil acidity is very im- 
portant in building and maintaining 
productive soil. Soil acidity affects 
the availability to plants of nearly all 
nutrient elements in the soil. As soils 
become more acid, certain elements, 
such as aluminum and manganese be- 
come more available and may be toxic 
to plants, while phosphorus and moly- 
denum become less available. 
(Continued On Last Page) 



Staffordsburg 

Mrs. J. A. Keener. Reporter 

There was an especially good turn- 
out for the January meeting of the 
WSCS on Wednesday evening, Jan. 
27, at the church. Mrs. Shaw opened 
the business meeting. The treasurer's 
report was read and a bit later the 
secretary's report given. Some letters 
were read. It was decided to send 
$10 to the cancer fund in memory of 
Mrs. Charles Perry, who passed away 
in December from that disease; also 
$3.00 fp/ food for the children of 
Laos. 'The MYF is having a bake 
sale on Saturday. The meeting was 
turned over to the program chairman, 
Mrs. Don Keeney, who had chosen 
"Christmas In Nepal," an interesting 
topic about in interesting people. As 
a nation living as their ancestors had 
for generations, they are taking their 
place in world affairs. Among those 
enjoying the program were Mrs. Pe- 
poon and daughter, Lola, Mrs. Don 
Keeney, Mrs. Finnell, Mrs. Taylor, 
Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Ramsburg, Mrs. Ly- 
da Rees, Miss Helen Richardson, Mrs. 
Shirley Losey, Mrs. Reva Finnell, Mrs. 
F. Keeney — later Rev. Pepoon and 
Seth came. 

The Homemakers met at the church 
on Tuesday. They have invited the 
Oak Island club to meet with them. 
We hope for good weather. 




Dawson Ballinger is feeling better, 
but is awaiting his doctor's call to go 
to the hospital. 

LOsTdRIVER LICENSES 



Listed below are the names of in- 
dividuals who have lost their drivers 
license for the week ending Jan. 22, 
as released by the Department of 
Public Safety to the Traffic Safety 
Coordinating Committee, Frankfort: 

KENTON COUNTY— Gary Clin- 
ton Gullion, 3140 Ccresent Ave, Er- 
langer, age 19, until Sept. 29, 1971; 
Phillip Andrew Neu, of 6517 Sugar 
Camp Drive, Independence, age 20, 
six months. 

BOONE COUNTY— Daryl Kendall 
Baker, 69 Marian Drive, Florence, 
age 77, unfil July 11, 1971; Anna R. 
Harrington, 1093 Petersburg Road, 
Burlington, age 45, until June 22, 
1971. 

A warranty is what expires just be- 
fore the thing breaks down. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

I wish to thank those who were so 
thoughtful of me during my recent 
illness. Your cards, visits to the hos- 
pital, flowers, prayers, and calls were 
most appreciated. They have helped 
in my recovery, and I am most grate- 
ful to everyone who showed concern 
in any way. 
,lt-5* — LUCILE HUDSON 



/ *Nb 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13 - 10:30 A. M. 

Having decided to quit farming and haying no further 
need for the following described items of Farm Equip- 
ment and Livestock, I will sell them at Auction on 
Saturday, February 13, 1971, located 8 Miles North- 
east of Warsaw, Ky., 2 Miles off U. S. 42, on Ross 
Road, Gallatin County — watch for auction signs! 

EQUIPMENT— 1966 John Deere No. 1020 diesel trac- 
tor, live power (3PTH), John Deere manure loader, 2 
sets 14-inch breaking plows, John Deere corn planter 
(3PTH) with fertilizer attachment, tobacco setter 
(wheel type), 1964 International No. 404 tractor with 
3PTH in good condition and new rubber, 2-row corn 
planter, No. 46 International hay baler (3PTH), hay 
rake 2 years old, New Idea fertilizer spreader, New 
Idea manure spreader (120 bu.), 1964 International 
No. 140 tractor, 1-row cultivator, 24' hay elevator, 
Ford mower (rear type, 6' cut). Ford disc (lift type), 
wagon with 14' flat and corn racks, farm water pump, 
lot hose, Wilson bulk milk tank (250-gallon), electric 
water heater (50-gallon), 2 stainless steel wash vats, 
2 sets Unico milkers (double units), set Ford culti- 
vators, lot steel barrels, 300-gallon diesel fuel tank 
with pump, set single unit Surge milkers, milking ma- 
chine pipeline and pumps, cucumber spraying outfit, 
lot small tools, approximately 500 bales mixed hay. 

23 HEAD CATTLE— 8 head Holstein cows (4 to calve 
in February) 6 of which are to drop 3rd calf, 3 15- 
months-old Holstein heifers, 15-months-old bull, 11 
head feeders (Holstein, Charolais and Hereford) 300 
to 400 pounds. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Mclntyre, Owners 

Warsaw, Kentucky 
—AUCTIONEERS— 

William D. Sullivan & Paul Noel 

Warsaw, Ky.— 567-6331 CarroHton, Ky.— 732-6721 

TERMS: CASH 

^ (Not Responsible For Accidents) 






Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 4, 1971 




Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mum charge of 50c for 25 words or 
less — over 25 words, 2 cents pet 
word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



For Sale— 



SINGER ZIG ZAG— All built in fea- 
tures, automatic bobbin winder, 
monogram, button hole, sews on 
buttons. Two tone paint almost 
new, will sell for only $!>0.00 cash. 
Ma^y consider terms. Call 689-7936. 

2t-5c 

FOR SALE— 1 to 10 acres. Bernard 
Stephenson, Stephenson Mill Road, 

Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4516 3t-4* 

; 

FOR- -SALE— 55x12 foot Elcona mo- 
bile home, tip out in living room, 
2 bedooms, kitchen and living room 
furniture, $3,500.00. Call 356-9810. 

lt-5* 

NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE— 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cash registers, 
and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also carry 
ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. For free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. tf-8c 

FOR SALE— 1960 4-wheel drive Jeep 
truck, 1-ton capacity. Telephone 
485-7179. lt-5* 

SPINET-CONSOLE PIANO — Want- 
ed, responsible party to take over 
spinet piano. Easy terms. Can be 
seen locally. Write Credit Manager, 
P. O. Box 276, Shelbyville, Indiana 
46176. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE— 2 oil heaters, $25.00 and 
$35.00. Box 497, Route 2, Beaver 
Road, Walton, Ky. 485-7455. lt-5* 



FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

FOR SALE or TRADE— 1967 Ford 
pickup, 6-cylinder, 8 ft. bed. Call 
356-6423. 2t-5* 

FOR SALE — Birch cabinets, corner 
sink arrangement, room divider bar. 
Need quick sale. Best offer. Call 
356-9713 after 4 p. m. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE — Charolais bulls, 7/8, 
15/16 and purebred French blood 
line from Ali Baba Dessauny; also 
some heifers. J. B. Spegal & Son. 
Phone 356-7537. 4t-5* 

REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5-speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 



FOR SALE— One used 1,000-gallon 
tank, $75.00; also old cars for the 
taking. 356-7537. 2t-5* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 

seed and feed of all kinds, at the 

Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 

Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 

> phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

INVENTORY Clearance Sale on ap- 
u parel at Boone Saddle Shop. West- 
ern and English apparel, saddles and 
tack. Hay and Purina feed; horses 
boarded. 1971 model Lane trailer. 
8179 Dixie Highway, Florence, Ky. 
Phone 371-1412. lt-5c 

FOR SALE — Two bedroom mobile 
home, reasonable. After 6:00 p. m., 
call 356-6780. 2t-4* 

SWEEPER— Hoover, nice two tone 
model, runs like new. Available for 
only $22.40 cash, may consider 
terms, must sell. Call 689-7936. 

2t-5c 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impala Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone, 
Ky. tf-47 

PICKUP TRUCK — 1968 Chevrolet 
pickup, 8-ft. bed, good tires and 
paint, Kentucky inspection sticker. 
Priced reasonably. Violett Motors, 
5042 Madison Pike, Independence, 
Ky. s lt-5* 

FOR SALE— 1,000 bales mixed hay. 
Sold farm. Call after 6:00 p. m., 
356-6428. , 2t-4* 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-IOc 

FOR SALE— Old model farm truck, 
International, in fair shape, with fair 
tires, price $200.00; also 1960 Olds 
convertible body. 356-5955. lt-5* 

FOR SALE — Jersey cow, cheap; one 
black saddle mare, bred to a Ten- 
nessee Walker. 356-6021. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE — Duroc and Hampshire 
feeder pigs; also a few 150-pound 
shoats. Gordon Moore, Old Lexing- 
ton Pike, Walton, Ky. Telephone 
493-5391. 2t-5* 

FOR SALE or TRADE— Good Ford 
IVi-ton farm truck, V-8, good bed 
and cattle racks, or trade for stock. 
Baker Bros., U. S. 42. Telephone 
485-7240. 2t-4* 

1968 PICKUP TRUCK— Chevrolet, 
8ft. bed, radio, heater, snow tires, 
good paint and tires. Violett Motors, 
5042 Madison Pike, Independence, 
Ky. lt-5* 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes, for 
other special occasions; also sewing 
of all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 
249-A Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. tHc 



. . . FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



r — CHAROLAIS— 

If You Like Charolais, Visit the 
LAZY J FARM, FISKBURG, KY. 

J. 6. Spegal & Son 

Phone 356-7537 




FOR SALE or LEASE— Store build- 
ing with living quarter, office rooms 
and full basement. Call, during day 
823-5241, or night 823-6361. lt-5c 

FOR SALE— 22 New Hampshire Red 
baking hens. 359-4588. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. - tf-49c 





WANTED TO BUY— Marble-top fur- 
niture, gflofLjused furniture, cut 
glasji^^funa and bric-a-brac. Good 
paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-IOc 



NOTICE- 



JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. tf-le 



FOR SALE— 5-room house and lot, 
good location, South Walton. Call 
after 5 p. m., 493-5506. Possible 
land contract. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE — Three 800-lb. steers, 
corn fed, ready for deepfreeze; also 
18-rhoriths-old green broke Walking 
Horse. Call 356-5129. 2t-4c 

FOR SALE — Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vaccinated. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

tf-2c 

TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

FOR SALE — Frigidaire dish washer; 
lady's bowling ball, bag, and shoes, 
size '9; man's bowling ball; all same 
as new. Call 485-7303. It5* 

FOR SALE — Horse-drawn mowing 
machine, John Deere 12-inch tractor 
plows, 3 antique telephones, and a 
mink coat. Call 356-2479. 2t-4* 

FOR SALE— 1965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 

: .» 

FOR SALE — Block, and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 



NOTICE— Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc^ 

SPARE TIME INC6ME — Refilling 
and collecting money from NEW 
TYPE high-quality coin-operated 
dispensers in your area. No selling. ( 

, To qualify you must have car, 
references, $600 to $3350.00 cash. 
Three to six hours weekly can net 
excellent monthly income. More 
full time. For personal interview 
write UNITED DISTRIBUTING 

' CO., DEPT. A, 6 North Balph 
Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15202. In- 
clude phone number. lt-4* 



COLES BEAUTY SHOP - Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 



Services— 



FOR SALE — Truck camper jacks, 
hold downs and mirrors, also four 
trailer jacks, one boy's 26-inch bike, 
$5.00. Phone 356-5596 after 6:00 
p. m. 2t-4* 



For Rent— 



FOR RENT— Sleeping room, and a 
bachelor apartment. Call after 5:00 
p. m., 485-4536 or 485-7319. 85 
North Main St., Walton. tf-3c 



FOR RENT— Modem 8-room house, 
30 acres, $200 month; with .38 
acre tobacco, $250 month. Avail- 
able February 15th. Call Monday- 
Friday, 9:00 to 300, 522-6310. 

2t-4* 

FOR RENT — 3-room house, and a 
2-room house. Elzie Webster, Ellis- 
ton, Ky., Route 1, 41038. Phone 
824-6617. 4t-4* 

FOR RENT — Four rooms, unfumish" 
ed apartment; adult or one child. 
493-5563. lt-5c 



Wanted- 



COMMERCIAL BACK HOE— Cis- 
terns, septic tanks, drain fields, and 
general work. Lunsford Trucking. 
356-7527. tf-5c 

JIM'S BARBER SHOP — 335 West 
Southern, Latonia. Two chair shop. 
First chair, Jim Coldiron; 2nd chair, 
Vic Rosenstiel. Latest hair cuts and 
styles. 4t-5* 

„ ,. r 

ELECTRIC SEWER CLEANING— 
Cisterns and septic tanks cleaned. 
Pre-fab concrete cisterns. J. F. 
Lucas Sanitatiorf^Company. Phone 
356-2315. tf-5c 

WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists; radios and stereos. Used TV's, 
perfect condition, guaranteed 30 
days. 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 
Phone 485-7616. . tf-3c 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO.- 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac- 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home- 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Or 

LIVESTOCK HAULING — Robert 
Richardson, 356-6749 or 291-8370. 

16t-44* 

DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South,. Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 

BUILD UP ROOFING - Shingles, 
gutter work, patch work of all kinds. 
New roof warranty. Free estimates. 
Phone 356-9853 or 356-7100. 

20t-39* 



WANT TO RENT FARM— In the 
vicinity of Walton, Nicholson or 
Independence area. Richard Kunkel. 
356-2081. 2t-5* 

WANTED— Cash for any kind of 

real estate, regardless of price or 

condition. Rel S. CBuck) Wayman, 

356-5068. tf-51c 

WANTED— Ride, Walton to Indus- 
trial Park, Florence. Arrive 7:00 a. 
m., leave 3:00 p. m. Please phone 
485-4823. It- 5c 



TEXAS OIL COMPANY 

needs g5od man over 40 
for short trips surround- 
ing Walton. Contact cus- 
tomers. We train. Air 
Mail R. B. Dickerson, Pres- 
ident, Southwestern Petrol- 
eum Corp., Fort Worth, 
Texas. 





dfaekattd 



A Personal Checking Account 



IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AS A 
BUSINESS CHECKING ACCOUNT 



OPEN A CHECKING ACCOUNT TODAY 



Dixie State Bank 



Save by Mail! 



Walton, Ky. 

Phone 485-4121 




Interest Checks Mailed Semi-Annually 



Member F. D. I. C. 
Accounts Insured to $20,000.00 



ELOISE BEAUTY SALON-125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 

•LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON^Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
493-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cox 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m., 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. t f-38c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS — For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC- 
IATION, 30 Needmore St, Walton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-IOc 

PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. tf-34c 

STEWART'S CUSTOM FARM 
WORK— Plowing, disking, grass 
seed sowing, mowing and baling 
hay, posthole digging. Call foi 
free estimate. Phone 356-5700 or 
356-9905. tf-13c 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf-29c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE— 
Now written to everyone, if driv- 
ing record is good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm pliability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington, Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

SEPTIC TANKS— Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS— Precast; sales 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 

FASHIONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. D^criminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, persona], 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fashionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 

YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER — m Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines as 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, "filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoovei 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Girard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 years in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00. tf-29c 



MOVING! 

NELSON &1ARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 



INCOME TAX 

ROGER SAYLOR 

Crittenden, Ky. 

824-4212 



: 




approac 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



for study. 

A good Study Lamp 
protects precious sight 
and helps reduce vis- 
ual fatigue. Look for 
the Better Light, Better 
Sight tag on the one 
you buy. 



safety... 

Outdoor lighting dis- 
courages prowlers. It 
highlights icy patches 
and other sidewalk 
hazards, too. Then you 
avoid a slip and pos- 
sible nasty spill. 



decoration 

A new portable lamp is 
the easie'st way to dec- 
orate with light. And a 
new lighting fixture or 
valance dramatizes 
your room's decor. 





See the many lamps and lighting fixtures 
on display, Our Lobby, Fourth and Main. 



■ ■ 



You may WIN. 

$100 in lamps and lighting fixtures 

or other valuable-prizes. 

Do It Electrically Week • Feb. 7-13 

The Union Light, Heat and Power Company 

Serving Northern Kentu&vy since 1901 



J 



* Thursday, February 4, 1971 



Wolton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



NEW BANKLICK 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

Our January Bible Study of the 
three Epistles of John was the beginn- 
ing of a new Spirit tn New Banklick 
Baptist Church! Under the able teach- 



ing of Dr. George Jones, the executive 
secretary and treasurer of our associa- 
tion, many things were observed that 
had been over-looked before. We 
graciously recommend this man of 
God to teach the Bible in any church. 
Those who attended the three sessions 
were Bob and Mae Matteoli, Bill 



AUCTION 

BUTLER AUCTION HOUSE • 

BUTLER, KENTUCKY PHONE 472-2880 

Paint - Brushes - Rollers - New & Used Furniture - Stoves - Rugs 



CARL LANCASTER 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
February 17th and March 3rd. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County— George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County — Donald Conrad 824-6551 

Campbell County— Bruce Trapp .635-5129 

Kenton County— George Bach 356-6278 



TRI-COUNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL b COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING b REPAIR 

Trenching b installation of Gas b Water Service 

824 6665 or 356-7477 



HELP WANTED 

Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to— 



BORON STOP 338 



1-75 b 338 



RICHWOOD, KY. 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 



Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax report service 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where 1971 changes were taught. 
He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE* 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 - 1 Mile South of Walton 
Phone 356-2172 



GOD'S 

WORD preached as it is from HIS Book 

+ THE 

BIBLE 

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

HELD IN THE AUDITORIUM OF 

BEECHGROVE ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOL 

SUNDAY SERVICES— 

Morning: Sunday School, 9:45 A. M. 

Church Services, 10:45 A. M. 
Evening: Training Union, 6:30 P. M. 
Church Services, 7:30 P. M. 

Pastor: Walter H. Lawson 



228 Wright Road 



Phone 356-2255 



Walton, Ky. 41Q94 



AUCTIONEER-BROKER 
We Conduct Private Sales - We Boy, SeD and Trade 






Bates, John Patrick, Harris Carpenter, 
Albert' and Mary Martin, Peggy John- 
son, Marie Schadler, Gilberta Kidwell, 
James and Mary Johnson, Raymond 
Lipscomb^Dewey and Shelly Switzer, 
Delbert Straub, Gene, Betty, Brian, 
Stanley, Ginger and Tammy Parker, 
Louise Mercer, Frances Beach, Anna 
Bell Stancil, George and Emma Schad- 
ler. The plans are to have Dr. Jones 
back to teach the Book of Ephesians 
in the very near future. 

New additions to our church during 
the month of January has been up- 
lifting in our spirits. For baptism: 
Shelly Switzer. By letter: Mrs. Georg- 
ina Best, Temple Baptist Church, 
Toronto, Canada; Mrs. Nannie Dillion, 
Ludlow, 4Cyj Bert—ami Lo is R e inhar t, 



Morning View, Ky.; and Mrs. Ray 
Elam, Corbin, Ky.; and Diana Car- 




BY LAWRENCE W. ALTHOUSE 



"HURRYING THE 
CHICKEN" 

Lesson for February 7, 1971 




Background Scripture: Luke 11:5-13; 
18:1-8. 

The late Emmett Fox used to 
tell a story about a city boy who 
was spending his summer on the 
farm. His hosts had a fine time 
showing him around the farm, 
pointing out the sights he had 
never seen in the city where he 
lived. 

One of the 
sights they 
showed him was a 
hen sitting on a 
nest of eggs. They 
told him that 
some day soon a 
little chick would 
come out of each 
egg. The little boy 
Rev. Althouse was delighted with 
this prospect and every morning 
he would race to the chicken 
coop to see whether the great 
miracle had yet occurred. 

No signs of change 

Days went by and the little boy 
became disappointed as nothing 
happened in the chicken coop. 
The eggs looked exactly as they 
had when he had first seen them. 
They bore no signs of change 
whatsoever. So his faith in the 
expected miracle began to wane. 
Finally, after many fruitless days 
of watching, he gave up alto- 
gether, deciding that he had been 
deceived. 

The next day, by sheer habit 
and no longer in anticipation, he 
went to the coop and was amazed 
to find that the miracle had taken 
place: the nest was alive with 
little chicks. How amazing it 
seemed that all this had taken 
place overnight. Yesterday the 
eggs had looked the same as al- 
ways, but today the eggs were re- 
placed by fully-developed baby 
chicks! 

Appearances, of course, had 
been deceiving to the boy. The 
eggs appeared to be the same 

every day, yet all the while won- 
derful changes were taking place 
inside them. The miracle was 
growing right before his eyes, but 
he couldn't see it. 

Is God punctual? 

In "My Fair Lady," Professor 
Higgins sings, "Why Can't A Wo- 
man Be Like A Man?" There's a 
sense in which our prayers must 
often sound as if we're saying, 
"Why can't God be like a man?" 
Why can't he do things our way? 
Why can't he pace himself ac- 
cording to our schedule? Why 
isn't he more punctual? 

This may sound presumptuous, 
yet isn't this what many of us 
feel deep down? "God, I asked 
you to help me last week, and 1 
still am in the same situation." 
"Lord, I've been asking for three 
years for you to change my hus- 
band, and he's still the same." 

The two parables in Luke 11 
and 18 are,not meant to compare 
God to an indifferent neighbor or 
reluctant judge. Rather, with 
these two stories, Jesus is saying 
that if these two all-too-human 
men will respond to a man's pa- 
tient persistence, how much more 
are we assured of the eventual re- 
sponse of a loving God! 

How long? How long? 

Many of us are like the un- 
happy army draftee who was be- 
ing drilled under a hot, scorching 
sun on a sultry day. The rookie 
and his comrades were neither 
enthusiastic or adept at what 
they were doing. A passing officer 
was startled to see the rookie 
drop his rifle. "How long have 
you been in the army?" he de- 
manded of the rookie. The man 
looked wearily at the officer and 
replied, "All day, sir." 

We all know of time when "all 
day" seems to be an eternity, but 
we must remember that it is not. 
Let us not "hurry the chicken," 
but patiently and persistently 
await the answer which God will 
give in his own good time. 



penter (by baptism). "And the Lord 
added to the church daily, those that 
should, be saved." 

Strange things are happening at 
New Banklick Baptist Church! That's 
right, girls! On Saturday night (Jan- 
uary 23) there was a ping-pong tourn- 
ament for the youth. The girls who 
attended went wild! Can you guess 
why? It seems by the grape-vine that 
there were only two girls present but 
. . . there were fifteen boys. WOW! 
We know two girls who really had a 
ball. Just think about it girls. Two 
girls among fifteen handsome boys. 
Double wow. Another Saturday night 
is now being set, so this time girlr, 
yo u had better be on the __ pW anr] 
don't let these same two girls hog all 
those handsome boys. 

Our RA boys keep moving right 
along with their basketball playing. 
They have lost only three games this 
season. They won their last game oveir 
Ludlow, 42 to 12. Congratulations, 
fellows. God speed to you fine boys. 
Mr. 'Ray Mercer sponsors and works 
with these fine young men of our 
church. He certainly needs some help. 
And we encourage the men of our 
church to take a greater interest in 
these leaders of the future. Your ef- 
forts will be greatly rewarded. 

The Sunday School Department, 
starting the first Sunday in February, 
has begun a contest among depart- 
ments. A beautiful "attendance" ban- 
ner is the honored trophy. It will be 
awarded each quarter in 1971 to the 
department having the highest per- 
centage in attendance. The department 
that receives the trophy banner the 
most often during 1971 will get to 
keep it permanently. The goal for 
our Sunday School has been set at 
200. We believe it can be reached in 
the first month with the Spirit of 
Christ in our our people. Our Sunday 
School Director, Mr. Harold Callen, 
extends a hearty invitation to anyone 



who does not attend Sunday School. 
The riches of God's blessings will be 
yours. 

The hours of our church services 
are: Sunday School, 9:50 a. m.; the 
Morning Worship, 11:00 a. m.; Even- 
ing Worship, 7:00 p. m.;" Wednesday 



night services, 7:30. The pastor, James 
D. Johnson, and all the members 
extend to those without a church 
home a hearty— WELCOME! 

Matrimony is the only state which 
allows a women to work 18 hours. 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne— 635-2695 




Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pond 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 



Lunsford Trucking-Blackfopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO LARGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 

MORNING VIEW, KY. 356-7527 - 359-4667 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 



Covington - Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
F. H. A. and Mortgages! 



If ever a man's job became obsolete, it was this fellow's. And what 
a job it was. He learned everything first, then imparted the news to others. 
If he had a good memory, he was usually the best informed man in town. 
Who else read every release and then shouted it all over fawn? He also 
was the principal advertising medium for the tradespeople and shop- 
keepers. He announced their products, services and special sales. 

And in most communities the town crier reminded men of the ap- 
proach of the Sabbath, urging them to be present for worship at the ap- 
pointed hour in the churches of the community. 

The newspaper made the town crier a has-been. It has taken over all 
his functions and performed them more efficiently. That includes remind- 
ing men of the day of worship, and, through advertisements such as this, 
urging us to worship. 

You see one thing hasn't changed. Man's need for God I 

MEET YESTERDAY'S 

NEWSPAPER 




Copyright 1071 Keliter AJvtriltlnf 
Service, Inc., Strubnrg, Va.* 



ScriptarM •elected by the 
Am r l f Bikle Society 



Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 

Revelation Mark Luke Matthew Matthew Matthew Matthew 

3:8-12 4:14-20 4:33-37 7:24-27 7:7-11 0:10-18 ^0:16-33 




The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 



ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 

Phone 485-4600 North Main St., Walton 

BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OP PEOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

Phone 485-4898 Walton, Kentucky 

BENTON-BONAR DEPT. STORE 

Phone 485-4495 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phone 356-2172 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or 371-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Kentucky 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 356-3081 Nicholson, Kentucky 

DIXIE STATE BANK A 

Phone 485-4121 Walton, Kentucky 



HALL ELEC. b APPL. SERVICE 

Phone 485-4087 Walton, Kentucky 

MOTCH— JEWELERS 

613 Madison Avenue Covington, Kentucky 

READNOUR COAL b FEED 

Phone 485-4504 Walton, Kentucky 

JOS. J. HOBAN INSURANCE AGENCY 

ROBERTS INSURANCE AGENCY 
Phone 485-4149 Walton, Kentucky 

RYAN HDW. b IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ah" Ryan 485-4161 Walton, Ky. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 485-tlU Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 485-4962 "Your Local Newspaper" 

WALTON HDW. b DRY GOODS 

Phone 485-4000 Cliff Ryan, Prop. 

WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 

Phone 485-41Q Walton, Kentucky 



J 



Wolton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 4, 1971 * 



IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID IN ADVANCE? 



-NOTICE OF BOND SALE- 



The Kenton County Fiscal Court, will until 9:30 A. M., E.S.T., on Feb- 
ruary 19, 1971, at its regular meeting place in Independence, Kentucky, receive 
sealed competitive bids on $925,000 of County of Kenton School Building 
Revenue Bonds, dated February 1, 1971 (Erlanger-Elsmere Independence School 
District). Minimum bid $906,500 plus accrued interest. Rates in multiples of 
1/10 or 1/8 of 1%. Neither the net interest rate nor any coupon may exceed 
734%. Coupon rate differential: \Vz% . Not over seven coupon rates. 

Bids must be on Bid Form contained in Information for Bidders available 
from undersigned or Charles A. Hinsch & Co., Inc., 1001 Fourth & Walnut 
Building, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202, enclosed in sealed envelopes marked "Bid for 
School Building Revenue Bonds." 

Denomination of $5,000. Only one, interest rate per bond; bonds of* same 
maturity shall bear same rate. Only one coupon shall represent interest for each 
period on each bond. 

Right to reject any or all bids or to waive any informality in any bid 
reserved. Good-faith check: $18,500, forfeited upon failure to take up such 
bonds when ready. 

Sale on the usual tax-exempt basis, subject to the approving legal opinion 
of Skaggs, Hays & Reed. « 

Delivery within 45 days from acceptance in Louisville or Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, Cincinnati, Ohio, or Nashville or Memphis, Tennessee, at no expense to 
the purchaser or at any other place desired by the purchaser at his expense. 

COUNTY OF KENTON, KENTUCKY 
Pub. 2/4/1971 By /%/ A. T. Wood, County Clerk 



CONVENING THE 
92nd CONGRESS 



50 BRAND NEW RECORDS $4.95 

(SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY BACK) 
*ou receive 50 brand new assorted 45 R. P. M. records at less than 10c 
each. These are not budget made but were made for high price sales. 
Elvis, Buck Owens, Dean Martin, James Brown. Great stars of today. 



FOLKS — This is no gimmick. Just a fantastic offer and you make 
no promise to purchase future records. We just simply have 
millions of records that must be sold. 



100 RECORDS $8.95—1000 RECORDS ONLY $75.00 

Larger volume prices on request. Orders post-paid except C. O. D. 

Any purchase enters your name in the "DECCO VACATION SWEEP- 
STAKES" or without a purchase you may enter by sending name and 
address. You may receive a vacation for two for 5 days of resort ac- 
commodations in beautiful Miami Beach. Dozens of vacations offered. 
'Winners notified by mail. Vacations valued at over $165.00 each. Only 
done entry per family. Void where prohibited by law. ^ 

DECCO RECORD COMPANY 



TEMPLE, GEORGIA 30179 



PHONE 562-3956 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 

U. S. Congressman 

4th District, Kentucky 



On Thursday, January 21, at 12:00 
noon, members of the new 92nd Con- 
gress were assembled for the call of 
the roll of States and swearing in 
ceremonies. I began my fourth term 
or seventh year in Congress. 

The chief presiding officer of the 
House of Representatives was Repre- 
sentative Carl Albert of Oklahoma. 
Albert, who was nominated by the 
Democrats, won over Rep. Jerry Ford, 
who was nominated by the Republi- 
cans. The party with the most mem- 
bers, of course, is in effect naming the 
Speaker. 

Each party reported its selection of 




Democrats passed in last year's Con- 
gessional reform act to insure Repub- 
licans adequate committee staffs to do 
their work. 

On Friday, in a special joint ses- 
sion with members of the Senate, we 



received the President for the delivery 
of his State of the Union message. 
I will write next week aboout his 

message. 

Classified Advertising Gets Results 



their leadership. Rep. Hale Boggs of 
Louisiana, will be the Majority Lead- 
er for the Democrats, and Rep. Ford 
will be the Minority Leader for the,, 
Republicans again. 

Officers of the House of Represent- 
atives were announced by resolutions. 
These are the positions of Clerk of 
the Hoouse, Sergeant at Arms, Door- 
keeper, Postmaster, and Chaplain. H. 
H. "Hap" Morrs from Kentucky con- 
tinues as our Postmaster. 

We then proceeded with the rou- 
tine business required to establish the 
new Congress. This included an at- 
tempted change of House rules by the 



WALLPAPER 

FOY JOHNSON FINE PAINT 

Picture Frames - All Sizes 

WALL-TEX ART SUPPLIES 

LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 

264 MAIN STREET FLORENCE, KY. 

—Parking In Rear — Phone 371-7921— 



DO YOU KNOW ... 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As Low As $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

. . NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market 



fe. 



COL. KENNER'S 
Appliance Co. 

5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440 

SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS, 
REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS, ETC. 



(Over 20 Years In the Service Business) 



H 



BankAmericard and Master Charge Honored 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG b COLEMAN GAS fir OIL STOVES! 



Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 



I 



IT'S HOME BUYING TIME! 8 
MAKE YOUR DREAM HOME A REALITY * 




We will be glad to help 
you own a home of your 
own. Stop at one of our 4 
convenient offices and we 
will tailor a low payment 
home mortgage loan to fit 
your budget. 



frlRST|?EDEI?AL 

SavinqsctLoan Association 

OF COVINGTON 
5th & Main Streets — Covington, Ky. 

ELSERE, KY. LATONIA, KY. 

J715 Dixie Highway 36th & Decovraey Ate. 

DIXIE HIGHWAY— SOUTH OP WALTON 



ORDINANCE NO. 1971-1 

An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to 
the existing westerly corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present westerly corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate terri- 
tory of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

SECTION 1. That all territory located within the boundary hereinafter 
set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth 
class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, said point being the 
point of intersection of the existing City Limits with Beaver Grade Road ap- 
proximatey 670 feet northwest of the west right of way of 1-75; thence North- 
easterly with the existing City Limits 640 feet, more or less, to the right of 
way of 1-75; thence Northeasterly with the right of way of 1-75, 900 feet, more 
oT less, to the right of way of 1-71 Southbound ramp to 1-75; thence with the 
right of .way curve to the left 1200 feet, more or less, to the southeast right of 
way of 1-71; thence Southwesterly with the 1-71 right of way 1680 feet, more 
or less, to a point 300 feet from Beaver Grade Road, thence 300 feet from an 
parallel to Beaver Road southeasterly 2650 feet, more' or less, to the existing 
City Limits; thence Northwesterly with the existing City Lirriits 910 feet, more 
or less, to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sec- 
tion 81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and henceforth be considered 
as with the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

SECTION 4. All ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
he remaining sections of said ordinance would have been passed despite such 
invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 4 members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 and February 4, II, 18, 1971 

ORDINANCE NO. 1971-2 
An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to 
the existing North and West corporate limits of the City of Walton, Ken- 
tucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best intersest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present northwest corporate limits of the 
City, and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate 
territory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

SECTION 1. That all the territory located within the boundary herein- 
after set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a 
fifth class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING AT the northeast corner of the existing City limits: thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of the C. N. O. & T. P. Railroad 
1060 feet, more or less, or sufficient to reach the north right of way of Ken- 
tucky No. 16; thence Easterly with said Kentucky No. 16, 100 feet, more or 
less, or sufficient to reach the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike; thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike 1220 feet, 
more or less, to the south right of way of Chambers Road; thence Northwesterly 
with the south right of way of Chambers Road 2300 feet, more or less; thence 
Southeasterly 300 feet, more or less; thence 300 feet from an parallel to 
Chambers Road southeasterly 1650 feet, more or less, to a point 300 feet from 
U. S. Highway No. 25; thence 300 feet from and parallel to U. S. No. 25 
southwesterly 2160 feet, more Or less, to a point in the Parker tract; thence 
with the Parker tract and projection of said tract line southeasterly 450 feet, 
to the existing City Limits; thence Northeasterly with the existing City Limits 
450 feet more or less; thence Southeasterly with the existing City Limits 340 
feet, more' or less> to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a s civil action filed as provided in 
Section 81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statues, in the Boone Circuit 
Court Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

SECTION 4. All ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
the remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regu- 
meeting of Council by a vote of 4 members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
fa * »»st: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 arid February 4, 11, 18, 1971 



COMPLETE INCOME TAX SERVICE 
Harold R. Weaver & Associate 

Farmer, Business, Professional, and Personal. 
Phone for Appointment or Stop In. 



Box 3, Big Bone Road 
Union, Kentucky 41091 



Phone 
384-3330 



Don't Be Late — 27 Years Experience! 



Hungry Jacks 
Smorgasbord 



NOON 
NIGHT 

and 
SUNDAY 




Plus Tax 



NOON 

NIGHT 

and 
SUNDAY 



20 SALADS — 10 HOT FOODS 
6 DESSERTS — 8 BEVERAGES 

You can't cook at home for these prices. Don't "settle for a sandwich. 
Come, visit us for a full meal. Bring the entire family — Aunt Louise, 
Uncle Ralph, Grandma, Grandpa, and Cousin Martha. 



8048 Dixie Highway 



371-8156: 



Corner Industrial Road & Route 25 - Florence, Kentucky 

Open 7 Days FORMERLY OLD FARM Open 7 Days 



Estate Auction 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY i ■ 10:30 A. M. 

LOCATION— 4 miles South of Ghent, Ky., on State Highway 47 (the 
Ghent-Sanders Road), and approximately 6 miles North of Sanders, Ky., 
in Carroll County, and is approximately 5 miles from Sparta- Warsaw 
Exit of 1-71. Watch for auction signs. 

In order to settle the estate of the late James Eli (Buck) Wheeler, I will 
sell the following: 

REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL PROPERTY 

FARM — Consisting of 114 acres (more or less), has 1.04 acres tobacco 
base (1970), 6-acre corn base. This farm has approximately 10 acres of 
bottom land and approximately 65 acres of ridge land of which approxi- 
mately 60 acres is clean, open land; has 7 acres timber land, remainder is 
hill and rolling land, suitable for pasture; has 2 acres, alfalfa hay, approxi- 
mately 20 acres mixed hay; plenty water (watered by 3 ponds, everlasting 
spring and creek), practically all of farm is in good grass except what was 
in cultivation the past year. This land is of good productive quality, being 
locust land, and has some locust which is now ready for posts, also has 
some walnut timber; has good line fence and good cross fence, and is 
fenced in several fields. 

IMPROVEMENTS — Frame house consisting of 4 ropms and a front > 
porch, good tobacco barn 54x45 feet with cistern, garage and stripping 
room 20x24 feet, feed bam 36x40 feet? eom erib, chicken house, and all 
necessary outbuildings. Immediate possession will be given to farm on 
day of sale with down payment and execution of contract. This farm may 
be seen any day before day of sale — contact Mrs. Louise Beverly at the 
farm— phone 502-347-5518. This farm will sell at 1:00 P. M. day of 
sale. This farm is well located, on good highway, mail, milk and school 
bus route service, within easy driving distance of -a growing industrial 
area, and in a good community. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY (Household & Antiques)— Couch, RCA tele- 
vision, gossip bench, electric floor lamp, stand table, 3 coal stoves, table 
lamps, clock radio, lounge chair, large alarm clock, electric clock, 4 chairs, 
2 oak and 1 cane bottom chairs, lot books, bed and springs, folding bed, 
feather beds and pillows, oak dresser, oak wardrobe, walnut dresser, walnut 
vanity, chifferobe, 2 kitchen cabinets, Hardwick bottle gas cooking stove, 
wood stove, 7-piece dinette set, medicine cabinet, electric hot plate, table, 
2-burner oil stove, round table and chairs^ lot dishes, lot cooking utensils, 
iron skillets, pots, pans, coffee pots, toasters, etc., wheat sacks printed 
and white sacks, washing machine, air conditioner, foot tub, buckets and 
dippers, large sea shells, cot, suitcase. 

ANTIQUES— Cherry bureau, cherry wardrobe, combination writing desk 
and bookcase (oak), 2 coffee grinders, butter mold, china cabinet, glass 
doors and glass sides, lot dishes (glass bowls, china, glasses, cups, platters, 
etc.) rolling pin and kneading board, muffin iron, iron W3sh boiler, iron 
kettle, wood washboard, picture frames, trunk, two 4-gallon cream cans, 
5-gallon cream can, oil lamps, lanterns, 3-gallon stone jars, 5-gallon stone 
jugs, 10-gallon glass jug, sausage mill, hay knife, farm dinner bell, Mason 
jars, mandolin guitar, flat irons, etc.,- stand table, sewing machine (pedal 
type). 

TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT, Corn, Small Tools and Miscellaneous- 
1968 model 140 International Farmall tractor (in good condition, good 
rubber), set 1-row cultivators, breaking plow, mower, side dresser, new 
seed sower, tractor harrows, tractor wagon and flat, D. C. Cast tractor 
(good rubber) and breaking plows, manure spreader, sled; 2-row corn 
planter, McCulloch chain saw, harrows, band saw tractor 20', 2 wall to- 
bacco presses, lot new lumber, 2 5-gallon buckets, black asphalt fiber 
roofing paint, 4 5-gallon buckets aluminum fiber roofing paint, pair plat- 
form scales, 6 10-gallon cans, 5 gallons No. 10 oil, 5 gallons 20 weight 
oil, 2 Vi-rolls barb wire, fluorescent lights, ice cream freezer, chickens 
(22 hens and 1 rooster), 2 ladders, 24x1 Oft. culvert, metal barrels, spider 
harrow, hillside plow, double-shovel plow, 2 laying-off plows, approximate- 
ly 25 barrels good yellow corn, sprayer, large tarpaulin, mail box, 1-man 
saw, 2-man saw, 2 pair barb wire stretchers, 2 tobacco setters, lot small 
tools (posthole diggers, axes, hoes, shovels, bench vise, hand saws, sledge 
hammers, chains, nana seed sowers, hone collars, etc.), 2 lawn chairs, 3 
lawn rockers, plus many other items too numerous to mention. 

(Not Responsible For Accidents) 

TERMS: Real estate, 20% of the purchase price to be paid down on 
day of sale; deed to pass to purchaser upon payment of balance of pur- 
chase price, which shall be no later than six months from date of sale. 
Personal property, cash. Lunch served on grounds. 

James Eli (Buck) Wheeler Estate 

MRS. LOUISE BEVERLY, Administratrix 

Ghent, Kentucky (Route 1) Phone 347-5518 

PAUL NOEL & W. D. SULLIVAN, Auctioneers 

Carrollton, Ky.— Phone 732-6721 Warsaw, Ky.-Phonc 567-6331 



Thursday, February 4, \9l] 



J 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



-DEATHS- 

WILLIAM HOWARD McCUBBIN 

Waiiam Howard McCubbin, 71, of 
108 Nicholson Road, Walton, died at 
12:30 p. m., Wednesday, Jan. 27, at 
St. Elizabeth Hospital, where he had 
been a patient for 10 days. 

He was a retired grinder for Crane 
and Breed Co., Cincinnati., and a 
lifelong resident of Boone County. 

Survivors include his wife, Edna 
Hodges McCubbin; a son, William 



McCubbin, Jr., with the U. S. Navy, 
Norfolk, Va.; three daughters, Mrs. 
Ruby Hawkins of Jeffersontown, Ky^ 
Mrs. Shirley Simpson of Independence, 
and Miss Bonnie McCubbin of Cov- 
ington; four brothers, Roy and Wen- 
dell McCubbin of Walton, Harry Mc- 
Cubbin of Ft. Mitchell, and Jim 
McCubbin of Boone County, and two 
sisters, Mrs. Dora Hon and Mrs. 
Ruth Vest, both of Walton. 



Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Saturday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. 






Accounts Insured 
To $20,000.00! 

WE PAY 

QUARTERLY 
INTEREST^ 

and the Highest 

Rates Allowable on 

the Following Accounts: 




2-Year Certificates 

Per Annum 
$5000 Minimum, 



6% 



12-Month Certificates 

Per Annum 

$1000 Minimum 



5%% 



6-Month Certificates 

Per Annum 

$1000 Minimum' 



5 J /4% 



Passbook Savings 
Per Annum 



5% 



R0SEDALE SAVINGS 



Caroline & Southern Avenues 

Phone 431-7723 



Covington, Ky. 



CARLISLE'S ?«££KIDS 



8E A WIS*E 
F0RESI6HTED MAN -, 
USE OUR YEARLY 
FUEL OIL PLAN 




With our yearly fuel oil plan, 
you're never uncomfortable. We 
provide warmth in all weather — 
without having to be called. 



e LOCAL TRADEMARKS, lab • 




MRS. ETHEL COLLIER 

Mrs; Ethel Flannery Collier, 71, of 
5558 Madison "Pike, Independence, 
died Friday, Jan. 29 at Woodspoint 
Convalescent Home, Florence. 

She is survived by three daughters, 
Mrs. Helen Coyle, Mrs. Betty Barrier 
and Mrs. Rosemary Stevens, all of 
Covington; a son, William Collier of 
Independence; a brother, Edward 
FIanriety~oFMcAllen, Texas; a sister, 
Mrs. Irene Lewis of Florence; 10 
children, and a great-grandchild. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Monday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Independence. Burial 
was in Independence Cemetery. 

REAMY SIMPSON 

Funeral services of Reamy Simpson, 
83, a former Walton businessman and 
a former resident of Orlando, Fla., 
were held at 2:00 p. m., Tuesday at 
Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home, 
Walton. Burial was in Highland Cem- 
etery, Ft. Mitchell. 

Mr. Simpson died Sunday, Jan. 31, 
at the Woodspoint Nursing Home in 
Florence. 

He is survived by twO sons, Paul 
Simpson of Walton, and Horace G. 
Simpson of Maysville; three daughters, 
Mrs. Lucille Clore of Englewood, Cal., 
Mrs. Thelma Chipman and Mrs. Ger- 
aldine Rich, both of Orlando, Fla.; 
two brothers, Opal Simpson of Wal- 
ton, and Roy Simpson of Cincinnati, 
and a sister, Mrs. Bird Cook, Florida. 

MRS. LILLIAN MULLINS 

Services for Mrs. Lillian Mullins, 
73, were held at 2:00p. m., Wednes- 
day at the Wilmington Baptist Church 
at Fiskburg. Burial was in Gardners- 
villc Cemetery. 

Mrs. Mullins died last Sunday at 
Booth Hospital, Covington . " She was 
a member of the Eastern Star, who 
held services Tuesday evening. 

She is survived by two sons, Mar- 
vin Mullins of Morning View, and 
Gene Mullins of Falmouth; a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Louise Fields of Ft. Wright; 
two sisters, Mrs. Flora Mangold of 
Florence, and Mrs. Christine Tun- 
gate of Piner, and a brother, Lester 
Glacken of Demossville. 

Peoples of Butler, had charge. 

MRS. PEARL F. ELLIOTT 

Mrs. Pearl F. Elliott, 89, formerly 
of Morning View, died Monday at 
Woodspoint Nursing Home, Florence. 

She is survived by eight daughters, 
Mrs. Edna Lagemann, Mrs. Clara 
Riley and Mrs. Margaret Meese of 
Cincinnati, Mrs. Hazel Mann of Morn- 
ing View, Mrs. Beular Knobloch of 
Dayton, Ohio, Mrs. Virginia Hudson 
of Independence, Mrs. Edith Hudson 
of Erlanger, Mrs. Dorothy McCoy of 
Midway, Ohio, and two sons, Wilford 
Elliott of Walton, and Milford Elliott 
of New Carlisle, Ohio. 

Services will be held at 2:00 p. m., 
today (Thursday) at the Wilmington 
Baptist Church, Fiskburg. Burial will 
be in the ^Wilmington Cemetery. 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Home, 
Independence, had charge of arrange- 
ments. 




SAVE NOW ALL MERCHANDISE 

Material Sewing Accessories 

Upholstery Material Glassware 

Toys Furniture 

NEW HOME SEWING MACHINE 
slop in at 



Kay's Variety Shop 



Crittenden, Kentucky 



Phone 823-5241 



WILLIAM N. STEENKEN 

William N. Steenken, 54, of 4415 
Oliver Road, Independence, was dead 
on arrivel Monday at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, where he was taken from his 
residence following a seizure of illness. 

He is survived by a son, Aljan E. 
Turner of Ft. Mitchell; two sisters, 
Mrs. Ann Cartser of Ft. Mitchell, and 
Mrs. Celestine Messert of Louisville; 
three brothers, Henry Steenken of 
Connersville, Ind., and Herman and 
Franklin Steenken of Villa Hills. 

Requiem High Mass will be at 10 
a. m., today (Thursday) at St Cecilia 
Church, Independence. Burial was in 
St. John Cemetery. Swindler Funeral 
Home, Independence, had charge of 
arrangements. 

County Agent's Vi.Acre 

(Continued from Page 4) 
Nitrogen is a very important ele- 
ment in the development of yield and 
quality in burley tobacco. Lack of 
nitrogen reduces the field and lowers 
the quality; however, an oversupply of 
nitrogen delays maturity and may also 
lower quality. For silt loam or clay 
loam soils where a good grass sod or 
small grain cover crop is plowed under, 



200 to 250 pounds of nitrogen per 
acre generally is sufficient. When the 
sod plowed under is Tated poor, or on 
sandy soils, 250-300 pounds of nitro- 
gen per acre should be provided. When 
the tobacco is grown two or more 
years in the same field, increase the 
nitrogen fertilization by 50 - pounds 
per acre. 

A deficiency of phosphorus in the 
soil results in poor quality tobacco. 
Phosphorus deficiency in the tobacco 
plants is characterized by slow growth, 
spotted, narrow leaves, and delayed 
maturity. Because soils differ greatly 
in levels of available phosphorus, the 
amount needed from fertilizer will 
vary considerably. Seventy-five to 200 
pounds of P205 per acre will be' suf- 
ficient for tobacco grown on soil test- 
ing medium or low in phosphorus. 

High levels of potassium in burley 
tobacco leaf are usually associated with 
dejirable quality, and may contribute 
to disease resistance of plants in the 
field. Soils that test medium or low 
in available potassium should have ap- 
plications of 200-400 pounds of K20 
per acre. On soils high in available 
potassium 200 pounds of K20 per acre 
should be applied to maintain the po- 



tassium level. Potassium fertilizers us- 
ed for burley tobacco should always 
be low in chlorine. 

Manure contains about 4 pounds of 
chlorine per ton. Excessive chlorine 
in tobacco causes sogginess and poor 
quality in the cured leaf. For this 
reason, do not use more than 10-12 
tons of manure per acre in fertilizing 
burley tobacco. 

Stop by or call the Extension Of- 
fice for "Fertilizing Burley Tobacco." 
Have your soil tested! 

The merchant sent his bill to a 
slow-paying customer with the nota- 
rial, "This bill is one year old." By 
return mail he got a greeting card 
saying, "Happy Birthday, Bill." . 

-BIRTHS- 

Born to Albert and Judith Fetrey 
of 338 Hicks Pike, Walton, a son, at 
12:00 p. m., January 29, at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital. 

With just a little »ore help from 
the government, therell be a fortune 
to be made in poverty. 




Hcnjfc one, $& toweat |wxl pni«©4 



HAM SALE 



GIGANTIC - TENDERIZED 

SUGAR CURED 
Whole or Shank Half — Lb. 



49c 



SIDE BACON 



SUGAR CURED 

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3 Lbs. or More — Lb. 



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WIENERS 



SKINLESS — VAC-PAC 
Full Pound Package — Lb. 



59c 



BING CHERRIES, Sweet Hickory 16-oz. size 45c 

FRUIT COCKTAIL, White Villa 17-oz. size 29c 

PINEAPPLE JUICE, White Villa large 46-oz. size 33c 

CUTteEN BEANS, White Villa 15%-ol size 23c 



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SYRUP m SWEET POTATOES, While Villa 23-01. size. .... 31c 
CHILI SAUCE, While Villa 12-oz. size 27c 



PULLET EGGS 



FRESH 
Extra Special 



3 doz $1 .00 



BEEF STEW, While Villa 24-oz. size 59c 



ORANGE JUICE 



Frozen White Villa 
Large 12-Oz. Size 



29c 



WAFFLE SYRUP, While Villa large 32-ei. size. 39c 



Assorted NAPKINS 



PATRICIAN 
200 Count 



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Produce Department 

APPLES cello bag 4M9c 

FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OF $3.00 OR MORE 



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Two Deliveries On Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 6:00 p. m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 8:00 p. m., Friday and Saturday 



Phone 485-4991 



Walton, Kentucky 



i nr 



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A Modem ly-Equipped Weekly Newspaper 



Letter Press and Offset Printing Phone: 485-4962 



Serving A Progressive Community — Boone, Kenton, Grant b Gallatin Counties 



10c Copy 



Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1971 



Christian Church 
Honors Retiring 
Pastor and Wife 

Members and friends of the Walton 
Christian Church honored their min- 
ister and his wife with a family din- 
ner in Fellowship Hall following the 
morning worship service on Sunday, 
February 7th Rev. and Mrs. Arthur 
J. Russell will retire from the active 
ministry the first of June. 

From an humble beginning at Vic- 
tory Christian Church, in Lexington, 
Ky., where he preached his first ser- 
mon, have come 40 full years of ser- 
vice to Christ. He returned to this 
* church the third Sunday in January 
and delivered the same sermon that 
he first used. The years of pastorate 
have have been shared in mission work 
through the General, Kentucky, South 
Carolina, and National offices which 
invloved traveling through most of the 
United States and some in Canada. 
In this work, Rev. Russell was re- 
sponsible for promoting leadership de- 
velopment. He says that this wide 
scope of involvment has made his life 
richer as he has experienced so many 
of the challenges and joys of the peo- 
ple he worked with. 

Following the meal, enjoyed by 
nearly 100 persons, there was a period 
of fellowship and songs, presided over 
by the board chairman, Paul Simpson. 
Mrs. Russell related some of the 
events of their most active life. They 
were presented with a beautiful an- 
tique brass bucket filled with lovely 
flowers — a memento from the congre- 
gation in appreciation of their loyal 
services here since December, 1967. 

The Russells are the proud parents 
of three daughters and a son. Mrs. 
Max Fiscus, her husband and three 
- children were present for the Sunday 
> program. The other daughters and 
families are: Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell 
Canim, St. Louis, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. 
James Dugelby, Kerrville, Texas, and 
the youngest, a son, Michael, a stu- 
dent at Texas Christian University in 
1 Ft. Worth. There are 11 grandchild- 
ren. 

Recalling some of the highlights of 
a long and fruitful ministry, Rev. Rus- 
sell reflected upon how so many peo- 
ple helped him get enrolled in Tran- 
sylvania College, Lexington^ in- 1929. 



NAMED OFFICIAL 
OF OKI GROUP 

Boone County Judge Bruce Fergu- 
son has been elected vice-president of 
the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional 
Planning Authority. 

Other officers elected at a recent 
board of trustees meeting at Carrou- 
sel Inn, Cincinnati, were Middletown 
(Ohio) City Commissioner Raymond 
W. Brown, president; Warren County 
Commissioner, second vice-president; 
R. A. Anderegg, Hamilton County ad- 
ministrator, was re-elected treasurer, 
and A. H. Hessling was re-named to 
the post of secretary. 

New Pastor at Florence 

The congregation of the Florence 
Baptist Church, Florence, welcomed a 
new pastor, Rev. J. William Jones, on 
Sunday, February 7. Bro. Jones and 
his family came to Florence from 
Princeton, Ky. He is a native of Mur- 
ray, Ky., and a graduate of the South- 
em Baptist Theological Seminary in 
Louisville. 

Mrs. Jones, nee Virginia Deriney, is 
a graduate of Georgetown College. 
They have three children, a son and 
two daughters. 

The Florence Church will have a 
reception in honor of Rev. and Mrs. 
Jones and their family on Sunday, 
February 14, from 2:00 until 4:00 p. 
m., in Fellowship Hall of the church. 

Walton Masons to Meet 

Walton Lodge, No. 719, F&AM, 
will hold its regular monthly business 
meeting on Thursday, February 18, at 



Times were tough on a young preacher 
in school who had an early morning 
paper route for financial support. Miss 
Eudora Groves soon gave a helping 
hand for the 4:00 a. m. route, and 
has been a faithful wife and helpmate 
since their marriage January 1, 1932. 

"In the mid-1940's I had the op- 
portunity to council with 15 young 
people who were going into full time 
Christian service. It has been a real 
blessing to work with these youngsters 
and see them mature and advance in 
fulfilling their calling as ministers, mis- 
sionaries, etc. While we were in 
South Carolina, we had the pleasure 
of assisting six young students find a 
way through seminary work. There 
are so many times each day that we 
have a chance to talk to someone and 
share the good news with them . . . 
it is hard to say what has been our 
greatest moment," Mr. Russell said. 

Since moving to the pastorate here, 
Rev. Russell has served as president 
of the Walton Ministerial Ass'n. 

The fact that his active ministry is 
coming to a close does not mean that 
they plan to sit and twiddle their 
thumbs and wait for old age. He 
plans to pursue his hobbies of rock 
collecting, furniture restoration, and 
add to his collection of unique clocks. 
"I feel that hobbies are an important 
part of our lives. They sometimes 
teach us more in a failure than we 
would learn in a success of our chosen 
vocation," Rev. Russell concluded. 

They will move to 629 Headley 
Avenue, Lexington, and live in the 
same apartment that they lived in 
when they were newlyweds attending 
college. — Jim Lawrence 

Walton OES To Meet 

Walton Chapter, No. 161, OES, 
will hold its regular monthly business 
meeting on Monday, February 15, at 
7:30 p. m. All members are urged to 
be present, and visitors are welcome. 
Refreshments will be served after the 
meeting. 

Get 71 License Tags Now 

Gov. Louie B. Nunn has urged 
Kentucky motorists not to delay ob- 
taining 1971 auto license tags, now 
on sale in offices of the County Court 
Clerk throughout the state. 



Simon Kenton FHA 
Alumnae Meeting 

The Simon Kenton Future Home- 
makers of America Alumnae met on 
January 21 with ten members present. 
Judy Courtney Schadler presided. 

The programs and activities were 
presented and approved with minor 
corrections and additions. The pro- 
grams for each month sound interest- 
ing and the activities guaantee lots of 
fun. 

The by-laws were presented by Rita 
Trapp Potts and approved with neces- 
sary corrections. With our club now 
being three years old, we now have 
some organization as to the officers' 
duties, our dues, etc. 

We then enjoyed delicious home- 
made cflkd ;ind cookies brought by 
the hostesses for the evening, Carol i 
Gailey Kitts and Peggy Bailey Wart- 
man. 

We would like to invite any former 
Simon Kenton FIIA member to visit 
our meetings, held the third Thursday 
of each month, and join in our pro- 
grams and activities, which include a 
knitting demonstration, creative ideas, 
first aid and safety, white elephant 
sales, bake sales, banquet, skating and 
bowling parties, etc. Of course it is 
all worth it in September when we 
have our "Night Out," and go to 
Cincinnati for dinner and a movie 
that is paid for by the club. This is; 
our reward for participating in our' 
various money-making projects. 

If the above information interests 
you and you would enjoy seeing some 
of the FHA girls you graduated with, 



f- 



Volume 56 - Number 6 



8:00 p. m. There will be work in the 

E. A. degree. All members are urged ™ me *° 1 our "f* m % t,n « on Thu ^ 

to be present, and visitors welcome. ^'pSS^i?' at r 7 /° * m "' at 

Refreshments will be served after the the RECC Bu,ld,n g> Independence 



meeting. 



Boone DAR Selects 
Four Good Citizens 



NEW TAX DEADLINE 
FOR INDEPENDENCE 

Deadline for payment of city real 
estate taxes has been extended by the 
City of Independence from February 
1 to March 15. 

After March 15, the 1970 tax pay- 
ments are subject to a penalty, ac- 
cording to Board of Trustees Chair- 
man Norbert Schoborg. 

The city also is looking for a new 
city clerk, Mr. Schoborg said. For* 
mer clerk Joe Huesman resigned be- 
cause of other duties. The job pays 
$50.00 a month. 

NEW HAVEN PTA 

The New Haven PTA will meet on 
February 15, at 7:30 p. m., in the 
school cafeteria. 

Founders' Day will be observed at 
this meeting, and all past presidents 
will be honored. 

All parents are urged to attend this 
meeting, and help support the PTA. 

A baby-sitter will be provided for 
the pre-school children. 

Refreshments will be served after 
the meeting. 

Bearcats Win Pair; 
Pioneers Win-Lose 

Walton- Verona 72, Silver Grove 43 

Walton-Verona continued in the 
race for the title in the NKIAC by 
defeating Silver Grove's Big Trains, 
72-43, Tuesday night of last week, at 
Silver Grove. 

The winners placed ten players in 
the scoring column with Gary Ingram 
leading the way with 20 points, while 
Mike Ferguson added 15. Steve Scott 
was the whole show for the Trains, 
scoring 26 points. Walton gained it's 



Our program titled, "A House of 
Ideas," being slides and a speaker from 

the telephone company is sure to be bi t advautagcs h thc Jnd 

interesting and informative. wtriHT. 

We will answer roll call with an 



final periods. 
The W-V reserves also won, 55-28. 



Boone County Chapter, Daughters 
of the American Revolution, has an- 
nounced the names of the 1971 Good 



Holmes 92, Simon Kenton 76 

Simon Kenton's Pioneers tossed a 



"Idea For Easy Cleaning." 

Vema Elliott Wagner and Rita 
Trapp Potts will be hostesses for the 
evening. 

Members present at the January scare into thifcovington Holmes Bull- 
meeting were: Judy Schadler, Rita d °S s before going down to a 92-76 
Citizens, who are graduating seniors Potts, Sandy Richardson, Judy New defea t Tuesday of last week on the 
selected from four local high schools. Ginger Bailey, Carol Kitts, Peggy Bulldog floor. 

They are: Patricia Robertson, Lloyd Wartman, Arlene Porter, Vema Wag- Bob Hurst led the way for the win- 
High School, Erlanger; Laura Rogers, ner and Pam Barnes.— Pam Barnes ners with eight points in the first 
Conner High School, Hebron; Diana — 



Sue Johns, Bo one C ounty High School, 
Florence, aricT~T3arlene Berkemeier, 
Walton-Verona High School, Walton. 
The contest is open only to girls 
and the recommended method of se- 
lection is to have the senior class 
choose three girls, and from the three 
the faculty selects one, who becomes 
the school's Good Citizen. The fol- 
lowing qualities are used for selection: 



period. The Pioneers, with Greg 
Halderman leading the attack with 
nine points, held" the^uppef hand in 
the second period, to bring his team 
up to a one-point deficit. However, 
Hurst and his mates took charge of 
This week is being nationally recog- things in the final period. Hurst toss- 

nized as Vocational Education Week. ed in 40 points for the evening, Sut- 
In Kentucky, the observance is ties had 17, Simpson 13, and Sandy 

particularly important to promote vo- U« Leistner led the Pioneers with 7 



National Vocational 
Education Week 



cational education and mereas« tha points. Davis had 17 and Halderman 

Dependability, which includes loyal- public's awareness of this growing 16. . 

ty, truthfulness and punctuality; ser- phase of education. The S. K. reserves lost 72-38. 

vice, which is cooperation, courtesy, Through vocational education, a ~ : ~ 

and consideration of others; leadership, a ] arge majority of youths and adults Walton-Verona 82, Augusta 52 

which is personality, self-control, and „ot only gain access to good jobs, but Walton-Verona's Bearcats won their 

also are able to advance to higher- 16th game of the season by trouncing 

paying jobs. Augusta, 82-52, last Friday night on 



ism, which is unselfish interest in fam- 
ily, school, community, and nation. 

On April 3, the four girls will be 
taken on an extended tour to Frank- 
fort, where they will be guests at a 
tea given by Mrs. Wendell Ford, wife 
of Lt. Gov. Ford, in the Old Gov- 
ernor's Mansion. 

FAIR BOARD MEETS 

A meeting of the Boone County programs in secondary, post secon- 

Fair Board was held January 26, in dary, adult, disadvantaged and handi- 

Burlington. capped areas. Presently, 2,800 voca- 

The following officers were elected: tional education instructors are in- 

John Walton, President; Franklin volved in the state's vo-ed program. 
Brown, Vice President; Beckham This would be a good time to start 

Shields, Vice President; Jack Ann- recruiting for next year, 

strong, Secretary-Treasurer, and Mrs. -^— _________ 



Now is the time for each parent tne Walton floor, in the NKIAC. 

and youth to think of the benefits of After the teams P^yed on even 

vocational education which can be rerms m the first period, the Bearcats 

reaped throughout an individual's life, gained a 10-point advantage in the 

especially in this age of science and second period and added to it as the 

technology. game progressed. 

During the 1970-71 school year, Ferguson led the winners with 23 

there were approximately 128,000 Ken- points ' while Ingram and Huffman 



tuckians served in vocational education 



R. V. Lents, Assistant Treasurer. 

Many new and exciting plans are 
being formulated to make the 1971 
fair (August 2-7) one of the best in 



added 15 tallies each. V. Kelsch was 
top man for Augusta with 23 points. 
Walton-Verona won the reserve 
game, 52-36. 

Simon Kenton 87, Dixie Heights 72 

Friday night of last week at Dixie 
Heights in the NKAC, Simon Kenton 
was the winner, 87-72. 

The Pioneers after leading by two 
points at the end of three periods 



WHITE'S TOWER PTA 

Tire regular monthly meeting of the turned on the 'scoring power in the 
Whites Tower Elementary School final ^^ {ot 31 ^^ to settle 
history. It is said that the Boone PTA was held Thursday, January 21 t he contest. 
County Fair is one of the top 15 in at 7:?0 P- ■_ in *e school cafeteria. For t he winning Pioneers, Haynes 
the state. It being Fathers' Night, the entire had 18 points, Martin 14, Halderman 

In the financial report, it showed ™mcss portion of the meeting was 1 C ( an< j j^e 14. F or t he losers, Tag- 
total assets at $40,412.88; total liabfl- conducted by the fathers. ] auer had 16, Frye 20, Fischer 16, and 
ities at $35,553.70, with a balance as Following the business session was Fookes 13. 

a display of gym equipment. Ivan 
Cooper, Physical Education Instruc- 
tor, explained the use and the results 
of each piece of equipment, which 
was then demonstrated by board mem 



of January 1, of $4,859.18. 



The reserve tussle was won by Dixie 
Heights, 57-38. 



New Topic — The Weather 

The past several days we have seen was then demonstrated by board mem- NAMED BANK DIRECTOR 
all kinds of weather— warm, zero, rain, bers, teachers, and the school prin- Stockholders of the Florence De- 
snow, and freezing rain. It is said, "If cipal, Charles Miller. posit Bank elected two new members 
you don't like Kentucky weather, just It was felt the program was well to the board of directors at a recent 
stick around and it will soon change. received and those participating surely meeting, according to William P. Mc- 



The only good part about the snow, had a ball putting it together. 



it gives the children an opportunity to 
use the new sled they received for 
Christmas, and a chance to get the 
old one out again. 

Don't forget to feed the birds dur- 
ing bad weather— they depend on us 
in cold weather, 



The meeting was adjourned and re- 
freshments were served. 



*>. 



Small boy to playmate as pretty lit- 
tle girl passes by: Wow, if I ever stop 
hating girls, she's the one 111 stop children live on Old Beaver Road, 
hating firstl Congratuations, my boy! 



Evoy, president. They are Harold L. 
Campbell, who is executive vice-presi- 
dent of the bank, and Arthur Tanner, 
Jr., another vice-president. 

Mr. Campbell is a native of Wal- 
ton, and he and his wife and two 



Are Outstanding 
Teenagers at Simon 
Kenton High School 

Twenty-seven seniors at Simon Ken- 
ton High Schools Independence, have 
received the honor of being recognized 
as "Outstanding Teenagers of Amer- 
ica," or as Merit's Who's Who of 
American Teenagers. 

The only requirement to receive - 
Merit's recognition is to be in the 
top ten percent of the graduating 
class. Those who met this require- 
ment and now possess this honor are: 

Greg Bach, Beth Brinkman, Nancy 
Butte, Linda Elliott, Nona Endress, 
Joyce Feder, Dennis Gray, Barbara 
Harms, Rhonda High, Peggy Jaeger, 
Karen Lamb, Rhonda LaFollcttc, 
Chuck Leffler, Steve Leistner, Delores 
Mcintosh, Lyn Miller, Steve Moss, 
Chela Richardson, David Smith, Sue 
Sterneberg, Mary Suter, Debbie Swain, 
Linda Williams, Judy Waters, Nancy 
Williams, Steve Hungler, and Diane 
Whaley. 

Also, four of these 27 students re- 
ceived the recognition of being "Out- 
standing Teenagers of America." Re- 
quirements for this honor are to be 
in the top ten percent of the grad- 
uating class and to be active in extra- 
curricular activities. Students receiving 
this honor are: 

Nancy Butte, .Dennis Gray, Rhonda 
Hight, and Gary Wagner. 

Emberton to Speak 
At Lincoln Dinner 

Tom Emberton, principal GOP can- 
didate for governor, will be the guest 
speaker at the Boone County Lincoln 
Day Dinner. The dinner is set for 
7:00 p. m., Tuesday, February 23, and 
will be held at Hungry Jack's Smorgas- 
bord, Industrial Road and U. S. 25, 
Florence. 

The dinner is being chaired by 
Mrs. Harry Daugherty, Union; Mrs. 
John Schram, Florence, and Mrs. R. 
C. Brakefield, Walton. 

Tickets are available from members 
of Boone County Republican organ- 
izations or by calling Mrs. Ivan Clem- 
ents of Union, 384-3352. Tickets are 
$3.00 each. 

The chief committee ~is~ 
Mrs. Russell Comett, Boone County 
Republican Women's Club President; 
Don Brown, Boone County Republi- 
can Club President, and Miss Wanda 
Dibert, TARS President. On the dec- 
orations committee are Mrs. Sylvan 
Martin and Mrs. Robert McManus. 

Serving as hosts will be Mr. and 
Mrs. Harvey Pelley, Mr. and Mrs. 
Leo Scalf, and Mr. and Mrs. Bill 
Bailey. 

50th Wedding Anniversary 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Baldwin, Sr. 
will celebrate their Golden Wedding 
Anniversary on Saturday evening, Feb. 
13th from 7:00 to 9:00 p. m., in Fel- 
lowship Hall of Sunny Acres Method- 
ist Church, Taylor Mill Road, Cov- 
ington. An open house reception is 
planned and friends and relatives are 
invited. 

Presently Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin 
live at 3499 80th Street North, St. 
Petersburg, Fla., but are formerly 
from Pelly Road, Independence. Mr. 
Baldwin retired as an engineer in 1963 
from the Pennsylvania Railroad. He 
is a member of Bradford Lodge, and 
the Scottish Rite Order of the Ma- 
sonic Lodge. Mrs. Baldwin is a mem- 
ber of the Eastern Star in Indepen- 
dence. 

The Baldwins have one daughter, 
Mrs. Nadine Asher, of Independence, 
and four sons; Bob of Cincinnati, and 
J. D., Bill and Ray Baldwin, all of 
Independence. They have 13 grand- 
children and five great-grandchildren. 

Retires As Bank Head 

A resident of the Independence 
area for many years, T. Byron Step- 
hens has retired as president of the 
First National Bank, Covington. 

Active in banking for 51 years, Mr. 
Stephens has been succeeded by Har- 
old Tniitt. 

Mr. Stephens was president of the 
Latonia First National Bank when it 
merged in 1961 with the Covington 
institution. 

At the annual stockholders meeting, 
assets of $34 million were reported — 
double that of ten years ago. 

In a modern home, a switch regu- 
lates everything except the kids. 




Miss Judith Hetterman 

Miss Judith Hetterman, a senior at 
Walton-Verona High School, recently 
was awarded the Betty Crocker award. 
She earned the highest ranking in her 
-school in General Mills 1971 search 
for the American Homemaker of To- 
morrow. She received a Homemaker 
of Tomorrow charm and her examina- 
tion paper will automatically be en- 
tered in judging to select the State 
Homemaker of Tomorrow. 

Miss Hetterman is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Hetterman, Route 
2, Crittenden. She plans to enter the 
University of Kentucky in the fall. 

Big Bone Lick 
Park to Get Land 

The State Parks Department has 
disclosed it is seeking to expand the 
present Big Bone Lick^Park area by 
approximately 230 acres embracing 17 . 
tracts of land adjacent to the park, 
near Highway 338, and within a mile 
of the boat dock near the park. 

According to reports, the land is 
now being surveyed, and some of the 
property is being appraised. Some of 
the property owners have been sent 
land contracts or options to sell their 
land. 

Ken Hart, assistant to Commission- 
er of Parks S. W. Palmer-Ball, said 
it is proposed, once the surveying and 
land-acquisition program is further a- 
long, to make application to the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Outdoor Recreation for 
funds to help finance the undertaking. 

Purpose of the proposed acquisition 
is to obtain more recreational facilities, 
picnic and supervised play areas for 
the community. It is part of the nat- 
ural program for expansion of the Big. 
Bone Lick Park area. 

Lions Club Meet 
Held February 2 

The Walton Lions Club met Feb. 
: The -guest speaker was DicTT 
Murray, a Covington druggist, who 
spoke about drug addiction. 

A new member, Martin Code, was 
installed by Lion Leon Hall. 

A Father-Son night will be observ- 
ed the evening of February '16. The 
members are asked to bring their son, 
or if you don't have one, bring some 
other young man. Ac cording to Don 



Rice, program chairman, a film on 
safety will be shown by the Kentucky 
State Police. 

Joe Koshin will report on the horse 
show that is being planned for early 
spring. 

The second annual Fast Time dance 
will be held April 24th at All Saints 
Church, Walton, from 9:00 p. m. un- 
til 1:00 a. m. The Johnnie "D" 
Band will furnish the music. 

The March 2 meeting will be a 
bit different— the meeting has been 
designated as Father-Daughter Night. 
All members are encouraged to bring 
their daughters, granddaughters, nieces, 
etc. It should be a big event. 

Kenton Elementary PTA 

The Kenton Elementary PTA will 
hold its regular monthly meeting on 
Thursday, February 18, at 8:00 p. m., 
in the school gym. 

Mrs. Eugene Zornes, vice president, 
will be in charge of the Founders' Day 
observance. All parents are urged to 
be present. 

Named to Honor Roll 

J. Carson Gary, principal of Pinker- 
ton High School, Midway, Ky., has 
announced that Cynthia Lynn Allphin, 
daughter of Mrs. Lucille Allphin of 
Walton, has been named to the honor 
roll with the distinction Magna Cum 
Laude for the fall semester, 1970. 

Miss Allphin is a senior at Pinker- 
ton High School. 

SOCIAL AT ST. CECILIA 

A hand embroidered percale pillow 
case social for the benefit of the 
Sisters of St. Cecilia will be held at 
the school hall in Independence, on 
Sunday, February 14, at 2:00 p. m. 

After getting swept off their feet, 
it's surprising how many girls lose in- 
terest in brooms. 



<, 



Thursday, February 11, 1971 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 



-* 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 
— Assistant Editor 
Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch. Foreign Rate, 6c Per Line. 




Mrs. Elizabeth Jones is spending a 
week with her daughter, Mrs. Will 
Lynn, and Mr. Lynn of Taylor Mill. 

Ree Spetler is spending some time 
in Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Wilson 
were Saturday dinner guests' of their 
granddaughter, Mr. and Mrs. Pat King 
o# Cynthiana. Other guests were Mr. 
and Mrs. Bill Rorer of Cynthiana. 

Tommy Black of South Main, has 
been on the sick list, but is better 
at this time, j • 

Miss Susan Jarman of the University 
of Kentucky, Lexington, spent the 
weekend here with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Andy Jarman, and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Webb and 
Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Ward and son, 
Dean, were recent dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Clifford of 
Cynthiana. 

Mrs. Bernice Caldwell of Lexing* 
ton, visited her sister, Mrs. Jimmy 
Smith, in St. Elizabeth Hospital, on 
Friday afternoon. 

Sympathy is extended to Mrs. Edith 
Black and family in the passing of her 
daughter, Mary K. Black. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kendall have 
been ill at their home on South Main 
Street. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Parker of 
Spauling, W. Va., spent several days 
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Burdine and Mrs. Savella 
Parker. 

Lewis Ryk;, who has been a patient 
in Booth Hospital, is now at Woods-, 
point in Florence. 

We are glad to report that Mrs. 
Lucile Hudson is able to be out again 
after an operation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fomash and 
family were recent guests of her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Roy McCubbin, 
and attended the funeral of her uncle. 
Howard McCubbin. 

Mesdames Richard Ryan, Ed Egan, 
William Parker and Floyd Humphrey 
entertained Mrs. Mary Stephenson for 
dinner Friday evening at Stringtown 
Restaurant, Florence. 

Mrs. Sue Davis and daughter, Pam, 
were Sunday guests of her father, Bill 
Roberts, and family. 



Mrs. Joseph W. Menefee returned 
home last Monday after spending an 
enjoyable weekend in Ft. Polk, La., 
with her husband, Pvt. Joseph W. 
Menefee. 

Mrs. Viola Roberts was taken to St. 
Elizabeth Hospital, Sunday afternoon, 
after having suffered a stroke at the 
Erlanger Rest Home. 

Mrs. Raymond Rotcr of Beaver, 
was ill the pasr\,week and unable to 
teach school. 

• 

Miss Diana Breeden and Dan Straw 
of Georgetown College, were the Sun- 
day guests of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Franklin Breeden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Jones and 
daughter," Evelyn, of Hilliard, Ohio, 
were the weekend guests of their 
children in Walton and Verona. 

Bill Robinson of Alta Vista, is a 
patient in St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
Room 303. 

Lowell and Eric Christy, twins of 
Mr. and Mrs. Orlando Christy, are 
patients in St. Eizabeth Hospital. 

Mrs. Fannie Adams of Nicholson 
Road, entered Booth Hospital, Satur- 
day for tests. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Sturgeon re- 
turned home Saturday after a short 
vacation in Florida. 

Wilford Beighle of Piner, under- 
went surgery at Booth Hospital, the 
past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Lawrence and 
son, Randy, were Saturday dinner 
guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Shelton, of Owenton. 

Lon Wilson of Beaver, is now re- 
siding at Woodspoint, Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Flynn enter- 
tained Thursday evening in honor of 
the birthday of their daughter, Mrs. 
Jack Rouse. Other guests were Mr. 
Rouse and family and Mrs. Frances 
Stephens and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Sturgeon, 
while in Florida, attended a Charolais 
meeting and sale at Tampa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Jack and Mrs. 
Martha Jane Carpenter were the Sun- 
day evening dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. W. Rouse. 



YES 



B 

: 



: 
: 



We have small acreage tracts for sale, located on ■ 
LLL Highway at Fiskburg; Brown Road at Verona; | 
Cleek Lane at Beaver, and near Interstate at ! 

Crittenden, — ~7~ ■ 

■ 

Gayle [ 
McElroy ■ 
Realty : 

33 Alto Vista Drive 

Walton, Kentucky i 
Phone: 485-4297 




BEAVER LICK Notes Of Servicemen 



Mrs. Edna Dickerson's house caught 
on fire one day this past week, but 
luckily they were able' to put it out 
before it spread through too much 
of the home. 

Miss Mary K. Black was laid to 
rest in the Beaver Christian Cemetery 
on Saturday. She was well known 
throughout the neighborhood and it 
was a nice day too. 

Butch Crouch has bought him a 
new car since coming home. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Ryan's father pass- 
ed away last week. 

One of the Big Bone school buses 
had an accident one day last week. 
Some man hit an icy spot on the 
road and ran into the bus, which was 
loaded and on its way to school with 
the children. Luckily none were ser- 
iously injured, but the" driver of the 
car was hospitalized. It is not known 
at this time just how badly he was 
injured. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Stephenson and 
son and Mrs. Rosenstiel visrted Sandy 
Stephenson at Morehead, Friday after- 
noon. They were all entertained for 
supper by a cousin of Sandy's mother, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Derrickson. Mr. 
Derrickson is head of the Agriculture 
Department of the University, and 
has one son attending college there, 
also two daughters in high school. His 
wife was also a former school teacher 
and Sunday School teacher. A mighty 
fine Christian family for any young 
girl to associate with. 

Mrs. Bertha Jack is much improv- 
ed this week. 



UNION 



The Pratts of Lonbranch Road had 
the fisfortune to lose their home by 
fire last week. 

Gary Perkins and Miss Cindy Pru- 
ett called on Mrs. Bruce Ryle, Friday 
evening. 

Mrs. Clarence McCain is home 
from the hospital after major surgery 
two weeks ago, and is doing fine. We 
wish her the very best. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Turner and 
children visited Mr. and Mrs. Elza 
Blackburn and children in Covington, 
on Friday. 

Debby Kirby and Brenda Lou Neal 
attended a slumber party at the home 
of Joan Williamson, at East Bend, on 
Wednesday. 

There is to be open house at the 
Hamilton. School on Monday, Februray 
15, 7:00 to R ; 0Q p. m. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville Dickerson 
and family of Falmouth, were Friday 
guests of his aunt and family. 

Mrs. Mae Horton had the misfor- 
tune to fall and beak her leg on 
Monday. She 'is home from and hos- 
pital and doing alright. 

Our milkman, Gary Lee Tackett, 
after delivery of milk here, was killed 
near Hebron, Thursday. We extend 
sympathy to the family. 

Orin Edwards is sfill quite poorly. 
We wish him a return of the very 
best of health. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Henry Beil call- 
ed on his parents, Thursday. 

Rev. and Mrs. James Wilson and 
daughter, Diane, of Visalia, visited Mr. 
and Mrs. Clinton Jones and Mrs, Bud- 
dy Love and children, Friday. "Mf.'* 
Love and a few friends are spending 
a few days in Florida. 

Mike ^uckett has retuned to Viet- 
nam after several days at home with 
his family. 

Mabel Beil and brother, James Wil- 
son, visited their father, Joe Wilson, 
at the Baptist Home in Newport, and, 
found him doing ifne. 

Home Noel ran into the school bus 
•Wednesday and he was hurt— had a 
broken knee cap and arm mangled. 
Dale Turner, one of the high school 
boys, had a fractured shoulder. Other 
children were just shaken up. 



The Menefee brothers, Airman 
Dwight D. Menefee and Airman 1/c 
Michael D. Menefee, help "keep 'em 
flying" in the Air Force. They are 
the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Tilford 
Menefee, Elliott Road, Demossville. 

Dwight is stationed at Sheppard 
AFB, Texas, and Mike at Vanden- 
berg AFB, Cal. 

Dwight is a J1970 Simon Kenton 
High School graduate and brother 
Mike a 1969 Simon Kenton grad- 
uate. Dwight recently had a seven- 
day leave at home and Mike had a 
15-day "vacation." 

A local GI stationed near the DMZ 
in South Vietnam was ' pictured as a 
typical U. S. soldier by UPI telephoto 
on Wednesday, February 3 in the 
Cincinnati Post. 

The young man in question is Sgt. 
Joe Norris. He was unofficially iden- 
tified by his wife, Carolyn, his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Norris, and 
a host of friends. Sgt Norris is ex- 
pected home soon for a 10-day leave. 

Slaffordsburg 

Mrs. J. A. Keeney, Reporter 

Our minister, Rev. Paul Pepoon, 
has been attending a pastor's confer- 
ence at Wilmore for a few days this 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Finnell, Jr., 
Neva Jo and Glenn, with Mrs. Joe 
Richardson visited Mr. and Mrs. R. 
Marshall and daughter of Nicholas- 
ville, January 31. 

Mrs. F. Reinhardt of Taylor Mill 
Road, is a patient in Jewish Hospital, 
recovering from surgery. She is the 
daughter of Mrs. Ed Jones of Visalia 
Road. 

Clifford Lipscomb, who is well 
known in this community, suffered a 
stroke recently and is now a patient in 
St. Elizabeth Hospital. 

This is not news, but probably a 

dream Is there among the readers 

of this paper anyone who knows how 
the old "log cabin" quilt was made? 
I have one which is probably over 100 
years old. Some of the blocks are 
worn and I would like to replace them 
but do not know how to do it. I 
should like to hear from anyone who 
knows. My address is: 561 Decoursey 
Road, Independence. Phone 356-6214. 

We regretted to learn that Mrs. 
Bryce Schulker fell recently and crush- 
ed her elbow. It causes her great 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We want to thank everyone, neigh- 
bors and friends, for their kindness to 
our family shown during the loss of 
our loved one, Gerald G. Roland. 
Everyone who brought food, sent 
flowers and said prayers. We send a 
special thanks to the Walton Volun- 
teer Fire Department Life Squad, Dr. 
J. M. Huey, Chambers & Grubbs, 
Rev. Kelly Kennedy, Mrs. Fay Con- 
ner, and all the pallbearers. May God 
bless each and everyone of you and 
keep you safe. 
* Mrs. Shirley Roland & Children 
Mr. & Mrs. Omer Roland and 
Mr. & Mrs. Gene Roland 
and Family lt-6* 



pain. We would love to hear that she 
is imprvoing. 

For the information of out-of-area 
friends of Dawson Ballinger, he is 
feeling better. He is getting out of 
doors and always glad to see friends. 

The Jack Greer family is expected 
to visit in this community over this 
weekend. They are bringing Neal to 
the doctoA 

Latest reports from Randall Wag- 
ner is that he is responding to treat- 
ment. 

I enjoyed a short visit on Friday 
with Miss Elsie Hiteman. 

We are glad to hear that Paul Sharp 
is home again from the hospital. 

The black sheep of the banking 
clan applied to his brothers for a loan. 
They agreed, but set the interest at 
nine percent. "I'm not complaining, 
brothers," said the outcast. "But what 
will bur father say when he bolls 
down and sees his own sons demand- 
ing nine percent from their own 
brother?" "Don't worry," replied one 
of the brothers. "From where Pop is, 
it'll look like six percent." 



VERONA 

Flonnie Kdrington, Reporter 

Mrs. Martha Crase got a call Friday 
that her mother, Mrs. Carrie Burton, 
was very ill, and she and her son, 
Dillard Crace, left Friday to be with 
her. We wish her a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Lillian Stephenson is getting 
along fine and is expected to be home 
from the hospital any day. We wfeh 
her a speedy recovery. 

(Editor's Note: We failed a receive 
page one of the Verona news). 




Valentine Day 
Sunday, February 14 



TRULY HOMELIKE 

A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 



Independence, Ky. 
356-2673 



—SERVING ALL FAITHS— 



Candid Weddings 

Color & Block & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, Walton 
485-4046 



COL KENNER'S 
Appliance Co. 

5980 Taylor Mill Road Oak Ridge 
Phone 356-5440 



Admiral Electric Cooking Stoves 

30 Inches Wide with Drawer, Hinged Cooking Surface, 
Plug In Surface Unit, Lift-Off Door $167.95 

30 Inches Wide, Hinged Cooking Surface, Plug-In Sur- 
face Units, Lift-Off Oven Door, Built-in Oven Light, 
Window Door, Lighted Control Panel, Minute Re- 
minder, Automatic Oven Timer, Timed Convenience 
Outlet „ $197.95 

These Stoves Have Many More Quality Features! 
Co l o r^-$3.50 txtra 



-o- 



Coleman Gas & Oil Heating Stoves 

GAS, 55,000 BTU, heats 3-5 rooms. .$131.00 

OIL, 35,000 BTU, heats 1-3 rooms $94.85 

— Installation Extra — 

Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m. 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 




COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERVICE! 




Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for You — 

Nie's Pharmacy 

LLL Highway between Independence and Nicholson 



4 



SMALL CHANGE TURNS 
INTO BIG MONEY 
AT GENERAL- 

Steady saving makes small sums 
mount up to big money. Thanks 
to our higher rates ... of divi- 
dends, compounded regularly . . . 
your money earns even more. 



the first la Kentucky 




GENERAL 
SAVINGS 



the general savings and loan association, inc. 

6th & Mfthaon, Covington, Ky. - 291-7219 4501 Dine Highway, Ebmcrc, Ky. - MM848 

y 




Walton Advertiser, Wdfon, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 11, 1971 



School Menu . . . 

Walton-Verona Schools 

Feb. 9— Ground beef and macaroni, 
•cole slaw, pineapple upside-down cake, 
Bread, butter, and milk. 

Feb. 10— Chopped S%ak, potato 
gems, green beans, jelk>, bread, butter, 
and milk. 

Feb. 11 — Turkey salad, creamed 
peas, mixed fruit, apple butter, hot 

CARD OF THANKS . . . 

First, thanking our Lord and Sav- 
ior for bringing , me home, and doing 
so well. Then, I want to thank every- 
one who was so kind and nice during 
my hospital stay and home. All the 
ministers, Bro. Davis, Bro. Russell, 
Bro. Ennis, Bro. Johnson, Bro. Hoff- 
man and Bro. Welsh, for their loving 
prayers. All the Christian-minded 
hrothers and sisters for their prayers, 
cards, flowers and food. Let us all 
keep faith in Jesus Christ. Thanks! 

JAMES "STONY" INGRAM 

lt-6c 








Etrtr 
J* 



biscuits, butter, and milk. 

Feb. 12 — In service day — no school. 

Feb. 15— Pork barbecue on a bun, 
cole slaw, Navy beans, banana pud- 
ding, and milk. 

Feb. 16 — Chili spagetti, toss salad, 
peach pie, bread, butter, and milk. 

Feb. 17 — Chicken fried steak, peas 
and carrots, mashed potatoes, jelloand 
cookies, and milk. 

Feb. 18 — Hamburgers on a" Buri7 
potato salad, buttered kale, chocolate 
cake, and milk. 

Feb. 19 — Tuna fish salad, potato 
chips, green beans, fruit, and milk. 



STATE OF 
THTOHTOM 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 

U. S. Congressman 

4th District, Kentucky 




DO YOU KNOW . . . 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As Low As $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market 



COMPLETE INCOME TAX SERVICE 
Harold R. Weaver & Associate 

Farmer, Business, Professional, and Personal. 
Phone for Appointment or Stop In. 



Box 3, Big Bone Road 
Union, Kentucky 41091 



Phone 
384-3330 



Don't Be Late — 27 Years Experience! 



President Nixon presented his State 
of the Union message to a joint meet- 
ing of Congress at 9:00 p. m., Fri- 
day, January 22. 

Administration goals set for the new 
Congress by the President, as simply 
as I can state them, are: 

Welfare Reform — A guaranteed 
minimum income for every American 
family with children. There is a plan- 
ned curb on payments to those who 
are able to work but refuse to do so. 

Peacetime Presperity — A Federal 
budget that will stimulate the econ- 
omy, an expanding money supply, and 
pressure on both labor and manage-' 
ment to check the wage-price spiral. 

Health Care — A set of proposals 
for improving health care and making 
it available to more people. The speci- 
fic goals are for basic medical care 
for every needy family; expand the 
supply of doctors, nurses and other 
health workers; encourage wider use 
of preventive medicine; make more 
care available in areas short of doctors, 
hospitals, and other medical services, 
and find a cure for cancer. 

Revenue Sharing — A plan to share 



federal revenues, with no strings at- 
tached, with states and cities for the 
purpose of improving education, trans- 
portation, law enforcement, urban and 
rural development, and so forth 

Reorganization of Departments — 
A plan to combine seven existing do- 
mestic Departments plus related in- 
dependent agencies into four new 
agencies. This would consolidate exist- 
ing programs into four distinct cate- 
gories, for human needs, community 
development, physical environment, 
and economic development. 

The message was almost over- 
whelmingly broad and optimistic. The 
objectives are all laudable but they 
can be better discussed when the 
President's actual plans and proposals 
are known. After I have given them 
a long, hard look I will be witting 
about each goal at a later date. 

Meanwhile, the President has won 
assurance of prompt Congressional 
hearings on reorganization of the gov- 
ernment's sweeping bureaucracy which 
we have watched grow by leaps and 
-bounds through the years without per- 
ceivable plan or conscious policy. 



B* C. & D. 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 




PUBLIC AUCTION 

The Owen County Board of Education Will Sell at 
Public Auction the Following Real Estate & Property: 



New liberty School 

FEBRUARY 13 — 1 :30 P. M. 

Eight-room building, large gymnasium, city water, oil furnace. Located 
on a 2.29-acre site in New Liberty on U. S. Highway 227. 

• . •• • 

All plumbing and electrical fixtures attached to above property will be 

sold with buildings. Several items of furniture and kitchen equipment 

will be sold at each building. 

TERMS— Real estate, 20% down, balance upon delivery of deed. 

Furniture and equipment, cash. 

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 

OWEN COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION 

PAUL NOEL— AUCTIONEER 



Home 
Agent's 
Party 
Line 

By 

Nancy Norman 

One out of every 4 garments worn 
B by woomen and children n this coun- 
try is made at home. The number of 
home sewers in approaching the fifty 
million mark. All of this adds up to 
the fact that the home sewing indus- 
try is one of the ten fastest growing 
businesses in the country. 

Why the sudden upsurge in home 
sewing? The reason that is given 
most frequently is that it has been 
elevated from a economy-based chore 
to a pleasure-based hobby with a 
strong emphasis on fashion. 

Prior to the Civil War, all women 
had to sew. Then the emergence of 
ready-to-wear reduced the number of 
home sewers and the task took on 
the stigma of poverty. Today's seam- 
stress ca select patterns from the lat- 
est array of styles and hundreds of 
fa s hi o n fabric s; In faet r patt e rn s line- 



in fashion and the related topics such 
as makeup and accessories. Sewing is 
used as a creative outlet. 

Today's home sewer is interested in 
the "look" and will pay more per yard 
for the fabric and a greater price for 
the pattern. Stores are discovering 
that some of their most expensive fab- 
rics sell very quickly ifNhey have the 
fashion appeal that women want. 

With all of this excitement in the 
home sewing market, we in the Ex- 
tension Service are constantly working 
with the home sewers to help them 
*stay abreast of current trends. The ex 
tent of our services can be summariz- 
ed as follows: 

1— Individual questions and prob- 
lems discussed by phoning or visiting 
our office. Quite often University of 
Kentucky or commercial publications 
will be given to you to give more 
depth to the topic. 

2 — A monthly newsletter that goes 
to home sewers who request their 
name be added to the mailing list. 
New products and techniques are fea- 
tured in this publication. 

3 — Workshops at graded levels of 
clothing construction are offered per- 
iodically. Enrollment for these is us- 
ually quite high and must be limited 
due to resources. 



for-line designer garments and fabrics 
that would tempt the Seventh Avenue 
Couture are available for the home 
sewer. 

The type of person that sews has 
changed, too. Most home sewers are 
young — in the 18 to 30 bracket. In 
fact, teenagers list sewing as their 
number one hobby. 

Women's Wear Daily describes the 
"typical" woman who sews as a young 
mother with young children. She is 
above average in intelligence and most 
have had either college or business 
training. The median level of income 
is $9,500 apd 85 percent own their 
own homes. She has a strong interest 



4 — Special programs taught by the 
agent or a commercial representative 
on certain topics. An example would 
be a meeting, "Sewing On Polyesters" 
to be held May 12 at 10 a. m. 

Driving's lot like baseball — it's the 
number of times you get home safely 
that counts. 



To mend a pot cover that has 
lost its knob, push a stainless 
steel screw up from the bot- 
tom, attach a cork on top, and 
you have a Mediterranean pot 
cover! 




phone someone 

you love 
long distance. 



Cincinnati Bell 




For best value in detergents, 
choose one with a high phos- 
phate content; no substitute is 
as good as phosphate for gently 
cleaning out the dirt. A good 
brand name if your best assur- 
ance of a high phosphate 
content. 

• *• 

Need new decorations for a 
child's room? Cut the illustra- 
tions off greeting cards you 
receive, then let the child mon- 
tage them on one wall! 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation & Repair 

Precast Cisterns and 

Backhoe Work. 

356-5804 



An Appreciation 



Of Our Heritage 




Perhaps, one of the things we 
should appreciate most today is our 
priceless heritage. 

What we consider every day, the 
good things in life that we enjoy, are 
ours because someone else paid a 
price for them. 

Our forefathers who brought this 
nation into existence, did so — not for 
their own profit and pleasure — but for 
the good of God and man. 

We are Americans. We say we are 
for America. Because of this position, 
we should be proud to live under a 
flag which stands for those ideals we 
value so highly and are willing to 
fight for to preserve. 

Today, too many danger signals are 
flying — many well informed patriotic 
citizens feel that too little apprecia- 
tion for our heritage is being transmit- 
ted in the school room. They say it 
is. educationally unsound to fail to 
teach this basic American concept: 



respect for law and order and the 
rights of others, for these ideals*^re 
fundamental ingredients of a free soc- 
iety. 

Teachers in the classroom should 

ft 

make a special effort to see that a 
greater appreciation for our heritage is 
transmitted to the students. This in- 
struction in the classroom should in- 
clude therefore, the teaching of proper 
respect for the flag. — Wendell Butler, 
Supt. of Public Instruction, Ky. 




INCOME TAX SERVICE 



Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax report service 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where 1971 changes were taught. 
He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE! 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 - 1 Mile South of Walton 
Phone 356-2172 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13 - 10:30 A. M. 

Having decided to quit farming and having no fur 
need for the following described items of Farm Equip- 
ment and Livestock, I will sell them at Auction on 
Saturday, February 13, 1971, located 8 Miles North- 
east of Warsaw, Ky., 2 Miles off U. S. 42, on Ross 
Road, Gallatin County — watch for auction signs! 

EQUIPMENT— 1966 John Deere No. 1020 diesel trac- 
tor, live power (3PTH), John Deere manure loader, 2 
sets 14-inch breaking plows, John Deere corn planter 
(3PTH) with fertilizer attachment, tobacco setter 
(wheel type), 1964 International No. 404 tractor with 
3PTH in good condition and new rubber, 2 row corn 
planter, No. 46 International hay baler (3PTH), hay 
rake 2 years old, New Idea fertilizer spreader, New 
Idea manure spreader (120 bu.), 1964 International 
No. 140 tractor, 1-row cultivator, 24' hay elevator, 
Ford mower (rear type, 6' cut), Ford disc (lift type), 
wagon with 14' flat and corn racks, farm water pump, 
lot hose, Wilson bulk milk tank (250-gallon), electric 
water heater (50-gallon), 2 stainless steel wash vats, 
2 sets Unico milkers (double units), set Ford culti- 
vators, lot steel barrels, 300-gallon diesel fuel tank 
with pump, set single unit Surge milkers, milking ma- 
chine pipeline and pumps, cucumber spraying outfit, 
lot small tools, approximately 500 bales mixed hay. 

23 HEAD CATTLE— 8 head Holstein cows (4 to calve 
in February) 6 of which are to drop 3rd calf, 3 15- 
months-old Holstein heifers, 15-months-old bull, 11 
head feeders (Holstein, Charolais and Hereford) 300 
to 400 pounds. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Mclnlyre, Owners 

Warsaw, Kentucky 
—AUCTIONEERS— 

William D. Sullivan & Paul Noel 

Warsaw, Ky.— 567-6331 Carrollton, Ky.— 732-6721 

TERMS: CASH 

. (Not Responsible For Accidents) 






Thursday, February 11, 1971 



— 



r \ 



Walton Advertiser, Woltorv Kentucky 




Church League 
Basketball Results 

Jiuihfc. first, game of the 
Basketball League, Saturday night, 
Piner defeated New Bethel, 94-80. 
Dunn led the winners with 82 points, 
and Rich was tops for the losers with 
41 tallies. 

The second game saw the Christ- 
ians rally in the last minutes to defeat 
Rich wood, 76-68. Rick Stephens and 
Jim Mullins led the victors with 27 
and 26 points, respectively. Spillman, 
Houston and J. R. Feagan had 13 a- 
piece for Rich wood. 

In the next game, the Methodists 
defeated All Saints, 84-65. G. J. 
Poore and Lloyd Poore led the win- 
ners with 29 and 26 points, respec- 
tively: -Bifr-Wethingtori led All Saints 



STATELY BIRTHDAY POSE»On the celebration of his 162nd birthday, the 
statue of Abraham Lincoln stands proud and tall in the Capitol Rotunda; The 
14-foot statue was designed by A. Wieman in 1911 and presented to Kentucky by 
James B. Speed of Louisville. (Steve Mitchell Photo) 



with 21 markers. 

In the last game, Hickory Grove 
edged out St. Patrick, 98-94. Mastin 
led the winners with 27 points, and 
Janeway added 26. Saalfeld led St. 
Patrick with 34 points and Meier 
had'30. 
' This Saturday at 5:30, the Method- 
ist play the Christians — in the first 
meeting of these teams, the Christian 
edged the Methodist, 61-60; at 6:45, 
Walton Baptist play St. Patrick; at 
8:00 p. m., Church of Christ tangles 
with All Saints, and the final con- 
test pits Piner against Richwood. 

The standings: 

Eastern Division — Christian 8-2; 
Piner 6-4; Methodist 4-4; St. Patrick, 
2-6; Richwood 1-9. 

Western Division — Hickory Grove 
8-2; Walton Baptist 7-2; St. Cecilia 
7-2; Church of Christ 6-3; All Saints 
3-6; New Bethel 0-10. 

A woman motorist, after a" traffic 
violation, was halted by a traffic of- 
ficer who ordered her: "Pull over." 
The judge fined her $25. She was 
anxious to keep her husband from 
learning of the incident. Since he 
regularly examined her checkbook, she 
marked the stub, "One pullover, $25." 

It's hard to believe that men will 
propose to a girl under a light they 
wouldn't even pick out a suit by. 




A Basketball Fiasco at 
New Haven Elementary 

The ladies on the New Haven fac- 
ulty, or the New Haven "Waddlers," 
as they are commonly known, will 
play the PTA Mothers at the New 
Haven gym. 

The men faculty members, well 
known as the "Leaping Turtles" at 
■school, will play the PTA Fathers. " 

Game time is February 1 1 at 7:00 
p. m. Admission is 50c for students 
and $1.00 for adults. Proceeds will go 
for science equipment for the school. 

This promises to be the spots event 
of the year, so come and enjoy your- 
self. 

Refreshments will be available in 
the cafeteria. — Pub. Chm. 



LOSE DRIVER LICENSES 

Listed below are the names of in- 
dividuals who have lost their drivers 
license for the week ending Jan. 29, 
as released by the Department of 
Public Safety to the Traffic Safety 
Coordinating Committee, Frankfort: 

KENTON COUNTY: Don Smith, 
644 Bowman Road, Independence, 28, 
until July 18, 1971; Peter G. Sharon, 
104 Goodridge Drive, Erlanger, 18, 
six months; Deforest Bishop, 3235 N. 
Talbot Ave., Erlanger, 36, six months. 

BOONE COUNTY: Richard Ed- 
win Klein, Jr., 273 Mt. Pleasant Road, 
Hebron, 19, until June 14, 1971; Jul- 
ian Steffen, 246 Locust Lane, Flor- 
ence, 33, until June 14, 1971. 

Republican Club To Meet 



-NOTICE OF BOND SALE CORRECTION- 



The Fiscal Court of Kenton County, Kentucky will consider competitive 
bids on $925,000 of County of Kenton (Kentucky) School Building Revenue 
Bonds, da&d February 1, 1971 at 9:30 A. M., E.S.T., on February 18, 1971, 
at the regular meeting place in Independence, Kentucky, rather than February 
19, 1971. All other terms relating to the sale of such bonds remain identical 
with those published in Notice of Bond Sale which appeared in this newspaper 
on February 4, 1971. 
(Pub. 2/11/71) (Signed) A. T. WOOD, County Clerk 



CHEMICAL CLINIC 



Come, hear the latest information on insect control 
and weed control in corn, alfalfa, minor elements, and 
weed control around the farm. 

Meeting Starts at 7:30 P. M., February 18th at 

Hungry Jack's Smorgasbord 

Dixie Highway & Industrial Road 

Sponsored By 

Boone County Farm Supply 

and 

Geigy Agricultural Chemical Co. 



Florence, Ky. 



Dividend Declared by Bell 

The Board of Directors of Cincin- 
nati Bell, last week declared a quar- 
terly dividend of 60 cents per share, 
payable April 1, to shareholders of 
record at the close of business March 
_L This wilLbc the 17 6th . d ividend 



paid by the company. 



Understanding Wife: One who has 
the pork chops ready when the old 
man comes home from a fishing trip. 



A sharp saw makes a sharp 

carpenter of any handyman. 

Have your saw precision 

sharpened by machine at 

CABER'S 

SERVICE CENTER 

5253 MADISON PIKE 
INDEPENDENCE, KY. 

Hours: Monday thru Friday, 5:30 
to 8:30 p. m., Saturday, 9:00 a. 
m. to 6:00 p. m. 

Phone 356-5548 

Hand or circular, fine or coarse- 
all saws set, oiled and sharpened to 
needlepoint perfection. 



Hie Boone County Republican Club 
'will meet at &;00 p. m., Thursday, 
Febuary 11, at the Republican Head- 
quarters in Florence. 

FREE NURSING CLASSES 

The Cincinnati Area Red Cross an- 
nounces the scheduling uf a - new series 
of free nursing classes scheduled to 
begin February 18 at the Memorial 
Building, 720 Sycamore St., Cincin- 
nati. For further information, call 
721-2665. 

Two Indians watched the white 
men building a lighthouse. One night 
after it was completed, the Indians 
took up their accustomed stations as 
a thick fog started to roll in. "Ugh, 
said one Indian to the other, "light 
shine, bell ring, horn blow, but fog 
come in just the same." 

The real diplomat is a woman who 
can look happy when she has an un- 
expected dinner guest 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We wish to thank our neighbors 
and friends for cards, flowers, food and 
kind words. Special thanks to Dr. J. 
M. Huey, Hamilton Funeral Home, 
the pallbearers, and Bro. Ralph Huff- 
man. 

The Charlie Richards Family 

lt-6c 



-GUNS- 

Hand Guns, Rifles & Shotguns 

Shooting and Reloading Supplies 

Holsters, Cases, Cartridge Belts, Scopes 

.22 Long Rifle Mini Mags... 85c box, reg. $1.00 

11 Long Rifle Mini Mags, H. P. ..95c box, reg. $1.10 

Small Pistol Primers CC1 .$7.50 per 1,000 

Large Rifle Primers CC1 $7.50 per 1,000 

GUN REPAIR & REBLUEING 

CLEVELAND GUN SHOP 

805 Cox Road, Off Taylor Mill Road, 
Near Cherokee Shopping Center Phone 356-9393 




jillowcases 
^ 412 pairs of socks 



use it 
everywhere 



m**^\ V % y stere it]j 





anywhere 



JUST 30 MINUTES 
TO DO IT ALL IN 
THE NEW HOOVER 



SPIN DRYING WASHER 



DRYER— $1 29.95 



DRYER... 




Gets laundry amazingly clean. 
Uses just 10 gallons of water 
and only 1/3 the detergent. 
Spin-dry a load in just 1 
minute. Completely portable 
...roll to the sink, no 
plumbing. Store anywhere. 
You have to see it to 
believe it. 



WASHER— $169.95 



• Compact x 

• Perfect Mate for Hoover Spin-Drying Washer 

• Portable . . . Rolls on Wheels 

• Plug Into Standard Electrical Outlet (15 amps) 

• Automatic Timer with Cool-Down Period for 
Wash n' Wear Fabrics 

• Fluff and Tumble Cycle 

• Automatic Shut-Off for Dryer and Heater 
When Door Is Opened 

• Starter Button Prevents Accidental Starting 

• Big All-Steel Drum — Quiet Operating 
9 Easy To Clean Lint Filter 

9 No Venting Required 

Choice of Snow White, Avacodo or Harvest Gold! 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF HOOVER CLEANERS! 



EASY CREDIT TERMS! 



Benton- Bona r 

65 N. Main SI., Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4495 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



f 

Thursday, February 11, 197! 




SECTION «J%W 



Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mum charge of 50c for 25 words or 
less— over 25 words, 2 cents per 
word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



For Sal 



SINGER ZIG ZAG— All built in fea- 
tures, automatic bobbin winder, 
monogram, button hole, sews on 
buttons. Two tone paint almost 
new, wiH-sell for only $50.00 cash. 

' May consider terms. Call 689-7936. 

2t-5c 



FOR SALE — Trombone;^ needs new 
case, $35.00. Call after 5:00 p. m., 
Jim Lawrence, 493-5433. tf-6 



FOR SALE— 1 to 10 acres. Bernard 

Stephenson, Stephenson Mill Road, 

• Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4516 3t-4* 



FOR SALE— 1965 Buick Grand Sport, 
401 cu. in., 360 h. p., 3-speed, 4- 
barrel, with 3.73 gears. Make offer. 
Extra, 2 snow tires. 356-2087 after 
4:30 p. m. lt-6* 

NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE- 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cash registers, 
;and calculators. Prompt service at 
■reasonable prices. We also carry 
•ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. For free estimate, 
'visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. • t f-8c 

FOR SALE — 2 acres, 5-room frame 
house, Wilson Road, Independence, 
$10,000. Rubbe Realty Company. 
356-9250. tf-6c 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— Toy Pomeranian puppies, 
AKC champion blood 'line, males 
and females, red, blue, blond and 
white. Joe A. Kannady, Elliston, 
Ky. 410J8. 2t-6* 



FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5-speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 

FOR SALE— Young hens and roosters. 
Clarence Rouse, 356-9793. lt-6c 



FOR SALE— Holstein heifer, to be 
fresh last of February or first of 
March. 359-4703. lt-6* 

FOR SALE— One used 1,000-gallon 
tank, $75.00; also old cars for the 
taking. 356-7537. 2t-5* 

PICKUP TRUCK— 1968 Chevrolet, 
8-ft. bed, extra sharp, Ky. sticker, 
ready to go. Violett Motors, 5042 
Madison Pike, Independence, Ky. 

lt-6* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

SWEEPER— Hoover, nice two tone 
model, runs like new. Available for 
only $22.40 cash, may consider 
terms, must sell. Call 689-7936. 

2t-5c 

FOR SALE or TRADE— 1967 Ford 
pickup; 6-cylinder, 8-ft. bed. Call 
356-6423. 2t-5* 

FOR SALE — Charolais bulls, J/8, 
15/16 and purebred French blood 
line from Ali Baba Dessauny; also 
some heifers. J. B. Spegal & Son. 
Phone 356-7537. 4t-5* 

REDUCE safe and fast with Gogese ' 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impala Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone, 
Ky. tf-47 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-10c 

FOR SALE — Duroc and Hampshire 
feeder pigs; also a few 150-pound 
shoats. Gordon Moore, Old Lexing- 
ton Pike, Walton, Ky. Telephone 
493-5391. 2t-5* 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing 
of all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse", 
249-A Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. ti-3c 

TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
•plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 



FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. "— U-49c 

FOR SALE— Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vaccinated. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

tf-2c 

FOR SALE— 1965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 



Wanted- 



WANTED — Non- drinking adult 
Christian couple to live in my 
home. All utilities paid. Mother 
partly paralized and eyesight failing; 
the lady or husband will have to 
give insulin shots, do house work 
and cooking. I'm a partly paralized 
veteran of WW II. My dad has 
heart trouble and can do little 
work. Man expected to drive and 
do yard work, plus < small errands. 
Good salary per month. Can intcr- 

, view Saturday, February 13, 1 :00 
to 4:00 p: m. Ernest L. Hight, 18 
Roe St., Walton, Ky. lt-6c 

WANT TO RENT FARM— In the 
vicinity of Walton, Nicholson or 
Independence area. Richard Kunkel. 
356-2081. 2t-5* 

WANTED— Cash for any kind of 

real estate, regardless of price or 

condition. Rel S. ^Buck) Wayman, 

356-5068. tf-51c 

WANTED TO BUY— Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 



For Rent— 



FOR RENT — Three-room house trail- 
er. Call 485-4298. lt-6* 

FOR RENT — Modern four-room un- 
furnished apartment; adults or one 
child. 493-5563. lt-6* 

FOR RENT — 3-room house, and a 
2-room house. Elzie Webster, Ellis- 
ton, Ky., Route 1, 41038. Phone 
824-6617. 4t-4* 



Glowering father, "And what's the 
reason for your coming in at 5 o'clock 
in the morning? Son, "Breakfast." 



... FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
dry water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 48S-4Q87 



FOR SALE— FAT HENS 

Fill your deep freeze. Cheapest 
meat these is — 50c on foot. 

ARTHUR'S EGG FARM 
Dry Ridge, Ky. Phone 824-4793 



INCOME TAX 

ROGER SAYLOR 

Crittenden, Ky. 
824-4212 




Services— 





Direct mail for 

Rosanne to 
MortonSaltCo. 
110 Nl W acker 

Drive, 

Chicago 60606 

the lifesaver it 



Although summer usually is 
nice, winter is^eomething else 
again. If you're up North, any- 
way. 

Winter in the "snow belt" 
means cold, wrndy,snowy«veath- 
er-and icy roads. And it means 
one of the best friends we have 
around. Salt. 
Highway rock 
salt, to keep 
pavemen t s 
bare and safe. 

Before auto- 
mobiles were 
improved, salt 
on streets was 
looked upon as 
a necessary 
evil. But now 
that we no 
longer blame it 
for causing our 
cars to rust, 
salt is being 
recognized as 
has been all along. 

The National Safety Council 
says that the only safe pave- 
ment is a bare pavement. Kock 
salt has a unique combination 
of valuable characteristics. 
Chemical efficiency. Economy. 
And speed of application. 

Did you know' that at 25°F. 
salt will melt about 15 timos its 
weight in id? And, at 30°, 45 
times? Highway officials now 
try to put salt down before the 
snow and ice arrive, which 
makes plowing more effective, 
too. 

All but two or three of the 
snow belt stale.* have mileage 
death rates below tlie national 
average. Hard to believe, but 
true. And the national rate has 
declined in each of the past four 
years. 

If you wou'd like to know 
more about this cold weather 
friend, just clip this article and 
the name of your newspaper 
and send them to me marked 
"Slory of Highway Salt." I will 
send you r.n illustrated 20-paTe 
booklet ; >;ouL the value of high- 
way salt. 



Ah, said the customs officer, find- 
ing a bottle of whiskey, I thought you 
said there were only old clothes in 
this trunk? Aye, that's my night cap. 



CK HATTLTNG — Robert" 
Richardson, 356-6749 or 291-8370. 

16t-44* 

JIM'S BARBER SHOP — 335 West 
Southern, Latonia. Two chair shop. 
First chair, Jim Coldiron; 2nd chair, 
Vic Rosenstiel. Latest hair cuts and 
styles. 4t-5* 



NOTICE- 



FREE TO A GOOD HOME— Part 
Collie female; large Terrier, adults 
only, needs fenced yard; part Ger- 
man Shepherd female; also medium 
size Terriers. Call 331-2374, 9:00 
a. m. to 4:00 p. m. 2t-6* 

NOTICE— Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 

LOST — Strayed from home, 2 young 
Foxhounds, black and white spotted, 
one male, one female, about 1 8" 
high,, no collar. Stanley Kacaba, 
Walton. 485-4046. lt-6c 



ELECTRIC SEWER CLEANING— 
Cisterns and septic tanks cleaned. 
Prefab concrete cisterns. J. F. 
Lucas Sanitation Company. Phone- 
356-2315. tf-5c 

WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists; radios and stereos. Used TV's, 
perfect condition, guaranteed 30 
days. 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 
Phone 485-7616. tf-3c 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE" CO.— 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Or 

COMMERCIAL BACK HOE— Cis- 
terns, septic tanks, drain fields, and 
general work. Lunsford Trucking. 
356-7527. tf-5c 

DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 

BUILD UP ROOFING - Shingles, 
gutter work, patch work of all kinds. 
New roof warranty. Free estimates. 
Phone 356-9853 or 356-7100. 

20t-39* 

LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON— Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
493-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cox 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12.00 to 8:00 p. m., 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. tf-38c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS — For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC- 
IATION, 30 Needmore St., Walton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 

PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. tf-34c 



JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday anr| gpt^ 
urday, 8:00 to -6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
■' Saturday. tf-lc 

COLES BEAUTY SHOP — Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 

ELOISE BEAUTY SALON— 125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf-29c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE— 
Now written to everyone, if driv- 
ing rccoroWs good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
oh life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington. Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

SEPTIC ' TANKS— Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS-Precast; sales 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 



FASHIONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, personal 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fashionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 

YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER — In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines as 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoovei 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Girard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 years in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00. , tf-29c 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 



IkctsTMRgure 

%\E LONGEST BICYCLE EVER 
BUILT IS THE VIGINTIPEDE. IT 
IS OVER 35 FEET LONG, 
WEIGHS TWO TOMS AND 
CARRIES 20 MEN. 



••• 



©YC10MES AND TORNADOS 
TURN COUHTER- CLOCKWISE 
\M THE NORTHERN HEMIS- 
PHERE AND CLOCKWISE IN n 
THE SOUTHERN. ^/^ 



&.->£: 



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WV>5o! 



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WAS LEVIED BV M\SS0URM^8Zl 



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BETWEEN -mE AGES OF 21 AND 5^ 



iWKEUfcl 



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fewNcos A rr~; — — - 

AMAZON I TR,,r^! T,VE 
, COUNT RFvAIm £' CA NWOTJ 

^UMertatTa^ l I 0WEsr 
•N THfffi D A^UTV 



TODAY, 
HIGH-SPEED 
ELECTRIC MULTIPLIERS AREAMUST 
FOR HOME AND OFFICE . ONE NEW 
MODEL BY SEARS, FOR UNDER 4 200. 
IS CALLED "THE MULTIPLIER" 
BECAUSE OF ITS AUTOMATIC; 
MULTIPLICATION FEATURE. m 



Thursday, February 11, 1971 



Wqlton Advertiser, Wolton, Kentucky 



NEW BANKLICK 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

THE RECREATION COMMIT- 
TEE of New Banklick Baptist Church 
'has some wonderful plans for our 
youth during the spring and summer 
of 1971. One thing of greatest inter- 
est is the attempt to have a Junior 
and Intermediate softball team. Ray 
■Mercer, our recreation "director, has 
not yet revealed his plans in toto, but 
we are sure they will be tpps. Ray has 
done a wonderful job with our boys' 
basketball teams. We also are indebt- 
ed to Frank and Gilberta Kidwell for 
working on this committee to super- 
vise both our boys and girls in our 
church located activities, such as the 
ping-pong tournament held recently at 
our church. There has been skating 



and other activity during the winter 

months. We are looking forward to 

greater things during the spring and 
summer of 1971. 

THE MISSION COMMITTEE, 
under the able direction of Albert 
Martin has been taking care of our jail 
services in Covington. Those partici- 
pating in this effort in the past are: 
Albert Martin, John Patrick, Elza 
Dean, Harris Carpenter, James Newby, 
Robert Matteoli and Virgil Hensley. 
We encourage others to give of their 
time and talents for this mission en- 
deavor. 

THE MISSION COMMITTEE 
AND THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
co-sponsor mission work at the Kyles 
Lane TB Sanitarium each Sunday. 
We most certainly do appreciate the 
number who are so faithful to attend 
so regularly in these efforts for Christ. 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 



Covington 



Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 



j 



F H. A. and Mortgages! 



Lunsford Trucking-Blacklopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO LARGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 



MORNING VIEW, KY. 



356-7527 - 359-4667 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
February 17th and March 3rd. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County— George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County— Donald Conrad 824-6551 

Campbell County— Bruce Trapp 635-5129 

Kenton County— George Bach 356-6278 



TRI-COUNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING & REPAIR 

Trenching & Installation of Gas & Water Service 

824 6665 or 356-7477 



HELP WANTED 

Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to — 



BORON STOP 338 



1-75 b 338 



RICHWOOD, KY. 



GOD'S 

WORD preached as it is from HIS Book 



THE 



BIBLE 

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

HELD IN THE AUDITORIUM OF 

BEECHGROVE ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOL 

SUNDAY SERVICES— 

Morning: Sunday School, 9:45 A. M. 

Church Services, 10:45 A. M. 

Evening: Training Union, 6:30 P. M. 
Church Services, 7:30 P. M. 

Pastor: Walter H. Lawson 

228 Wright Rood Walton, Ky. 41094 

Phone 356-2255 



Brother Gene Parker is the music di- 
rector, and our pianists are Mrs. Kath- 
erine Hopperton, Margaret Kanatzar 
and Barbara Johnson. Those who give 
their time for these mission efforts 
are: Ray and Louise Mercer, Roy and 
Frances Beach, Anna Sorrell, Peggy 
Johnson, John Patrick, James Kanatzar, 
Willie Kidwell, John and Helen Goff, 
Robert Matteoli, and Pastor Johnson. 
Those who give of their time for 
mission efforts are rewarded in many 
blessings by making others happy in 
the Lord. 

A YOUTH CHOIR is in the mak- 
ing at New Banklick Baptist Church. 
Yes, because of the demand by ou^ 
teen-agers for a variety of musical in- 
terests, a YOUTH CHOIR is being 
started by Ray Mercer, recreation de- 




BY LAWRENCE W. ALTH0USE 



WHAT IS HUMILITY? 

Lesson for February 14, 1971 




Background Scripture Lukt 14:7-1 1i 
18:9-14. 

Jesus's parable about the 
places of honor at a banquet re- 
mind me of an experience I had 
a number of years ago. We were 
living in the suburbs of New 
York City at the time. A semi- 
nary classmate and his wife came 
to visit us and had 
but one request: 
they wanted to be 
in the audience for 
one of Jack Paar's 
Tonight shows. 

In order to get 

there early enough 

| to get good sea>.3, 

I proposed taking 

a "short-cut" into 
Rev. Althouse the city to beat 

the traffic. Like so many best-laid 
plans of mice and men, this one 
went astray and we got to the 
studio just as the doors were clos- 
ing. When we got inside it was 
obvious that there were no more 
seats available except for a front 
row reserved for V.I.P.'s. 

The last were first 

My heart sank, but just then, 
the usher beckoned to us, leading 
us down to the front row of seats. 
I couldn't believe it: these were 
the best possible seats, just a few 
yards away from the performers. 
As we sat down, the crowd, know- 
ing as we did that these seats 
are reserved for dignitaries, be- 
gan to buzz excitedly with "I 
wonder who they are?!" 

Apparently the performers 
were just as confused for they 
too smiled and nodded at us. Mr. 
Hugh Downs came by our seats 
and chatted with us for a few 
minutes. Mr. Paar's guests on the 
show would from time to time di- 
rect their attention to us as if 
we were the sole audience and 
later, when Elsa Maxwell brought 
some food on stage, she brought 
some over to us, setting the stu- 
dio audience to buzzing once 
again. > 

Often I have wondered why 
that usher did what he did with 
usthat night. Perhaps he was one 
of God's angels sent to demon- 
strate anew that God often makes 
"the last" to be "first." My own 
best efforts to be "first" had end- 
ed in near disaster and it was 
only an act of grace that literally 
propelled us forward. 

Humility and truth 

From time to time we must be 
thus humbled before we learn to 
be truly humble. We must learn 
that we cannot make it through 
life on our own wit and right- 
eousness. In fact, in addition to 
the fact that we cannot achieve 
moral perfection, God does not 
require it of us as a prerequisite 
to answering our prayers. CRE- 
ATIVE PRAYER, The only de- 
mand God does make of us is 
humility, not perfection. 

Often, then, the channel of 
grace is closed to us, not because 
we are sinners, but because we 
are not humble and, worst of all, 
we may not even know that we 
are not humble. 

Inverted pride 

So what is humility? St. Vin- 
cent de Paul says, "The reason 
why God is so great a lover of 
humility, is because he is the 
great Lover of Truth." St. There- 
sa puts it even more simply: 
". . . it has always seemed to me 
that humility is simply truth." 
What God wants of us, then, is 
not modest lies or self-mutilation, 
but the truth. He wants us to be 
honest about ourselves. E. Her- 
man says: "At least one-half of 
what we call humility, especially 
the habit of self-accusation and 
self-abasement which passes for 
a deep sense of sin, is the fruit 
of self -obsession." 

Self-abasement may often be 
no more than an inverted pride. 
What God wants of us is simply 
the truth. It is both bad enough 
and 'good enough without dis- 
tortion. 



partment director. Any teen-ager be- 
tween the ages of 13 and 20 yean of 
age are eligible to enroll. This group 
will in no wise interfere with the 
present Junior Choir under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Frances Beach, Mrs. 
Jackie Grayson and Mrs. Katherine 
Hopperton. There are future plans to 
send this Youth Choir on tour this 
summer, if full cooperation of the 
youth and parents, are given. There 
is also rumors about the possibility of 
organizing severaf Folk-Musicals using 
the Youth Choir members. If you 
are interested, why not see Ray.,, Mer- 
cer and get your name in the pot 
now. 

- THE YOUNG MARRIED PEO- 
PLES' SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS 
TEACHER, HERMAN SPADA, and 
wife, Wanda, have a new baby girl at 
their house. She is Jodi Sue, bom on 
Tuesday, January 19, 1971, at St. Eliz- 
beth Hospital, weighing in at six 
pounds, 13 ounces. Mother and babe 
doing well. Let us take this oppor- 
tunity to encourage any of our young 
married people, up to ages 35, to visit 
this wonderful class if you do not have 
a church to attend. Brother Herman 
is an excellent Bible teacher and loved 
by everyone. We know if you come 
to visit, you'll want to stay. If you 
wan{ to study the BIBLE then this is 
the class to join. 

. The motto of New Banklick Baptist 
Church is: "Enter to Worship — De- 
part to Serve." You are only a visitor 
once because you will want to come 
back for more of good Gospel preach 
ing and singing. The pastor, James 
D. Johnson, extends a cordial welcome 
tp anyone who does not have a reg- 
ular church home. 

Friend: So you and your son are 
carrying on the business together . . . 
Owner: Not exactly — I run the bus- 
iness and my son does the carrying on. 





IS REALCf A GER- 
MAN BREED. THE. 
ISA.ME DERIVES 
FROM THE GERMAM 

*pud£lin; / meaning 
"to splash in the 

WATER. 



Afi/r/OOTB 

REMOVING FOREIGN SUBSTANCES 
FROM VOUR. OOG'S COAT 
WITH TURPENTINE OR 
KEROSENE MAY CAUSE 
A PAINFUL BURN . TO H EAL 
AvPPLY VEGETABLE OIL OR 
PETROLEUM JELLY. 





re£D/A/G r/p 

MOST DOGSTHRIVE ON 
ONCE-A-DAV FEEOI NSS, 
IF THEIR DIET \S NUTRIT- 
IONALLY WELL-BALANCED. 
IF YOUR COG BBSS FOR FOOD, 
HOWEVER, TRV DIVIDING 
HIS RATIONS INTO MORNING 
AND EVENING SERVI NGS. 



From 



frisKies 



Nutrition Research Kennelt 



Support Your Local 
S.P.C.A. or Humane Society 



% 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne— 635-2895 




Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pond 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 





E FOR LEARNING 



These are the wonderful years, when there is so much to learn - and 
hours enough in which to learn it. 

Youth has an unquenchable thirst for knowledge; also the desire, 
the capacity and the energy to absorb - If given even a little encourage- 
ment. But today, perhaps more than over before in history, youth does 
need guidance. 

Be sure the young people In your life have the opportunity to ex- 
amine the whole picture. But in their search for the stars, don't let them 
forget the miracle of this planet upon which they live and its Creator. 

Let them know their church. 



Copyright 1971 KMftar Advwtblng S«rvJct, Inc. Stmburg, Virgin* 



Scripture! i elected by *• American Bible Society 



Tuesday 

John 
1:29-34 



Wednesday 

John 

3:14-17 



Thunday 
John 

4:1-14 



Friday 

John 

6:27-37 



Saturday 

John 
6:63-66 



m^&^<^^^^^^m9m^mm:m^^m 



The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 



ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 

Phone 485-4900 North Male St, Walton 

BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PEOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

PhOM 485-4818 

BENTON-BONAR DEFT. STORE 

Phone 485-4495 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phase 888-1171 Walton, Keatocky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or 371-905$ 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Keatachy 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 358-3081 Nicholson, Kentucky 

DIXIE STATE BANK 



HALL ELEC. & APPL SERVICE 

Phone 4854087 Walton, Kentaeky 

MOTCH-JEWELERS 

018 Macttson Atom* Covtafton, 

READNOUR COAL fir FEED 



Phone 485-4181 



Walt—, Keatachy 



JOS. J. HOBAN INSURANCE AGENCY 

ROBERTS INSURANCE AGENCY 
Phone 485-4149 Walton, Kentucky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ah" Ryan 485-4181 Walton, Ky. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 485-0111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 485-4081 "Year Local Newspaper** 

WALTON HDW. & DRY GOODS 

Phone 4854000 Cliff Ryan, Prep. 

WALTON LUMBER *HMPANY 

Phone 4854183 Walton, Kentaeky 



I 



Wolton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 1?, 1971 



\r 



20 Years Ago . . . 



Thursday, February 8, 1951 
WALTON— 

Prizes were awarded to Arthur Lin- 
ton, Jr. and Cleo Martin for the best 
essays submitted on the topic, "Citi- 
zenship." This contest was sponsored 



by the Wa-Na Club and conduted in 
the Citizenship class of the Walton- 
Verona High School. 

Mr. and Mrs. Powers Conrad left 
Sunday for Louisville, where they will 
attend the annual Hardware Conven- 



Foy - Johnston 

DIRECT FACTORY PAINT DEALER 

Wallpaper In Stock 
- Wall-Tex Art Supplies 
Picture Frames . . . 

LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 



264 Main Street 
Park In Rear 



Florence, Kentucky 
Phone 371-7921 



tion and will then continue their va- 
cation in Hot Springs, Ark. 

Eli Russell recently purchased the 
registered Brown Swiss bull, Feather- 
tone Silver's Gem, 10+154, from John 
A. Caldwell of Burlington. 

Classes were resumed at the Walton 
Graded and High School, Monday, af- 
ter a week's vacation because of weath- 
er conditions. 

Mrs. Jesse W. Thornton is recover- 
ing at St. Elizabeth Hospital from a 
major operation. 

The miscellaneous shower given in 
honor of Miss Betty Maloney and Guy 
Carlisle at the Methodist Church last 
Thursday evening, was well attended, 
considering the cold weather. 



■ 

5 

: 



IT'S HOME BUYING TIME! 
MAKE YOUR DREAM HOME A REALITY 

We will be glad to help 
j, you own a home of your 
own. Stop at one of our 4 
convenient offices and we 
will tailor a low payment 
home mortgage loan to fit 
your budget. 

llRST^EDERAL 

Savinqs^Loan Association 

OF COVINGTON 
5th & Main Streets — Covington, Ky. 

ELS ERE, KY. LATONIA, KY. 

3715 Dixie Highway 36th & Decooraey Ave. 

DIXIE HIGHWAY— SOUTH OF WALTON 




WMIMIHIlti ii i £>;* 




DISCOVER THE 

BIG DIFFEREHCE 



IN LOW-COST AUTO 
INSURANCE 

You do save money with our 
Special Budget Automobile 
Policy. What's more, you get 
quality protection and 
hometown agency service 
. . . service you can count 
OD at all times. 

These p/us benefits add up 
to a big difference for you. 

Call or write us today for 
full facts. 

J. B. JOHNSON 

95 North Main Street 
WALTON, KY. 

485-7102 

/ 

REPRESENTING 

^AUTOMOBILE MUTUAL 

/INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE* COLUMBUS, OHIO 





SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20th 



s 



10:00 A. M. 



At the farm of Mr. & Mrs. Richard Turner, Cason Lane off Sherman-Mt. Zion Rood (Fred Eeklar Farm Owner). 
If coming South, take 1-75 to Crittenden Exit, then U. S. 25 to Sherman; if coming North, take 1-75 to Dry 
Ridge Exit, then U. S. 25 to Sherman. 



' Sherman, Ky., Grant County 



Mr. & Mrs. Turner are leaving this farm and will sell on the above date— 

TRACTORS, EQUIPMENT, CATTLE— 1969 Farmall 756 diesel tractor with big tires, 3-point hitch, 2 right 
and left hydraulic valves, also with power steering, power brakes, deluxe seat, rear weights, independent take-off, 
also 1,000 rpm, 100" axle— bought new Oct. 2, 1969; 1970 444 Farmall tractor (gas), live power, power steering, 
differential lock, auxiliary valve for remote cylinder with bumper, plus Freeman front loader, stay bar adjustable, 
to be sold as a unit together— bought new April, 1970; 1952 Farmall Super H recently overhauled, with new head, 
also has extra low gear; all tractor equipment listed below will be sold separately and will not be grouped with 
tractors— 3-point hitch I. H. (No. 411), 4-bottom 14-inch plows (like new), spring trip beam, Holland tobacco 
setter (fib I. H. A, 100 or 140), Woods B-114 rotary mower (914-ft cut pull type), 3-point hitch I. rf. 2-row 
corn planter, I. H. rubber tired wagon with new 8xl6-ft. flat bed, lV^-ton trailer with 750x20 tires, 3-point 
hitch 2-barrel boom 21-ft. spray. Also to be sold for a neighbor, Mr. Lovelance — 1954 G Allis Chalmers tractor 
with motor in rear, cultivators, plows, sickle bar and rotary mower underneath, all work on hydraulic lift 

Forage Harvester Equipment includes New Holland Super 717 with 9 knives, 1969 model, used 1*4 corn seasons, 
Fox blower (power take-off) with long hopper, used 2 years with pipe for 35' silo, extra pipe, distributor buckets, 
new elbow, ropes and pulleys, 2 New Holland wagons with rubber tires and self unload, also electric unload, 700 
pounds front end weight and bracket that fits 544, 656, 756 or 856, new 50-ft. endless 6-in. rubber belt, Champ- 
ion tobacco spray, 275-gallon water tank, 20-ft. hay elevator and motor, 7-ft. I. H. pull type disk, power take-off 
water pump, cow clippers, aluminum electric heater, Warm Morning stove, log chain, many tractor and plow 
parts, electric grinder; DeLaval milker, sterling type, floor model with extra bucket 

30 head of Holstein cows, heifers and one boll; seven of these cows range in age from 4 to 9 years, balance are 
3 reaxs and under, heifers range in age, 9 months to 2 years, some heifers are bred, some open— there are 16 
cows inflUng now and milk was weighed Jan. 13—2 cows gave 67 to 73 lbs., 1 cow gave 58 lbs., 8 cows gave 
from 40 to 46 lbs., and 5 cows gave 34 to 39 lbs.; yearling Holstein bull— TB and Bangs tested. 

TERMS: CASH 



Sale Conducted By 



COL. CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

REALTORS-AUCTIONEERS-APPRAISERS 



4 East Southern Avenue, Covington, Ky. 

Phone 431-4222 Anytime 
"If You Have Anything to Sell— Call Us" 



Main Street Williamstown, Kentucky 

823-1611, if no answer, dial "O" and ask for 

(no charge) Enterprise 4222 



AUCTIONEERS 



COL. CECIL WAYMAN & REL C. WAYMAN 




Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Wilson of 
Verona, and Miss Orpha Fisher of 
Lawrenceburg, Ind., were guests Sun- 
day of Mrs. Erma Stockman. 

Mr. and Mrs. Art Smith recently 
heard from their son, Bobby, who is in, 
the Air Force — for the first time since 
last May. 

INDEPENDENCE— 

Edward Schulker, who was flown 
here from Korea to be at the bedside 
of his father, John Schulker, reports 
that it was tough going fighting with 
the U. S. forces North of the 38th 
parallel. 

Men who were married after last 
June 25, "can expect to receive an in- 
duction call in March or April," W. 
M. Baulch, Chairman of Selective 
Service Board 50, Covington, has an- 
nounced. 

Members of Kenton Fiscal Court, 
Saturday, approved a resolution urging 
the State Highway Department to 
make a survey of the proposed access 
highway from Covington to Florence 
and Devon. 
BEAVER LICK— 

Misses Judy and Jill Feagan, Patsy 



COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
'/2ACRE 

— by— 
JOE CLAXON 



A few farmers in 1970 produced 
corn with no-tillage in Boone County. 
Their reports in the main are very 
favorable. This practice of growing 
corn may be productive in the future. 

As the demand increases for higher 
levels of crop production, conserva- 
tion of soil and water resources be- 
comes more important. The modern 
farmer must continually seek cultural 
practices which increase profits and 
at the same time conserve natural re- 
sources. 

For these reasons, a relatively new 
production management system called 
"no-tillage" has been adopted by many 
corn producers* and is receiving wide- 
spread attention from agricultural sci- 
entists. 

No-tillage offers a decrease in labor 
costs and at the same time uses the 
soil and water resources more effici- 
ently. 

When one is trying to intensify 
crop production, a very important fac- 
tor is more efficient use of water. No- 
tillage production is a positive step to- 
ward increasing water use efficiency 
and protecting the crop against short- 
term droughts. No-tillage increases the 
infiltration capacity of soils, hence, de- 
creasing the amount of surface runoff 
and serving as a very effective erosion 
control measure. 

The killed sod cover under no- till- 
age contains a dead air space that 
serves as an insulator. This surface 
mulch prevents some of the sunshine 
from reaching the soil and produces 
loWfcr day soil temperatures under no- 
tijlage than under bare conventional 
plots. This insulating effect also pro- 
duces a slightly higher night time soil 
temperature. After the corn seedlings 

»ch sufficient height .to shade the 
ground the difference in soil temper- 
ature between no-tillage and conven- 
tional diminishes. 



Mastin, and Judy and Joyce Dicker- 
son were shopping in Beaver, Satur- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Black and 
daughter spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Ed Black. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Sparks and baby 
spent Sunday with her mother, Mrs. 
Annabelle Stephenson, and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Smith had as 
dinner guests Sunday evening, Mr. and 
Mrs. Marvin Kelly and children, Mr. 
and Mrs I. D. Isaacs and son, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black and Lee 
Trapp. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Moore and 
son spent Tuesday evening with Mr. 




NEW 
DIMENSIONS 
IN BEAUTY 

by Alice Koscot 



DEAR ALICE: I've been 
told to use a moisturizer, but 
I have oily skin. Do I need it? 
A.J. 

DEAR A.J.: Yes. Oily skins 
may also be thirsty for mois- 
ture. A coat of moisture lotion 
under make-up, and moisture 
cream at night. I like mink oil 
moisturizer; it pampers. Isn't 



greasy 



DEAR ALICE: My skin is 
n:>; a pretty color. Make-up? 
HELP! 

DEAR HELP: Try a base 
close to your skin color, spar- 
in,"' v. Overlay with a tone you 
Like. Top with translucent pow- 
der. 

DEAR ALICE: What hair- 
do please lor small head, fea- 
tures? TINA. 

DEAR TINA: Small hair-do 
with birr impact. Sleek, close to 
head. Try a short, side-parted 
wig, synthetic, for variety and 
fun. — 

DEAR ALICE: I have a 
short, neck. What necklines for 
me? B.N. 

DEAR B.N. : Show more skin, 
via V-necks. Strive for vertical 
lines. Small, up-turned hair. 

DEAR ALICE: What is best, 
loose or pressed face powders? 

S.N. 

DEAR S.N.: Loose translu- 
cent powder to set make-up; 
pressed powder compact for 
touch-ups. 



For 150 Beauty Tips, send self 
ssed, stamped envelope to 
Koscot, P.O. Box 11040, 



<: 



f Orlando, Florida 32803. 



and Mrs. William Wilson. 



Spaghetti-Meatball Supper 

The public is invited to attend a 
meatball and spaghetti supper, sponsor- 
ed by the Married Couples Class of 
the Independence Christian Church. 

Serving will begin at 4:00 p. m., 
Saturday, February 13th, and continue 
until 8:00 p. m. Adults, $1.25, and 
children, 50 cents. The menu will 
consist of meatballs and spaghetti, 
French bread, tossed salad-, Trbmemade 
pie, and drink. 

Take your Valentine out for an 
enjoyable home-cooked meal. 



ORDINANCE NO. 1971-1 

An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to 
the existing westerly corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WH.EREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present westerly corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate terri- 
tory of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

SECTION 1. That all territory located within the boundary hereinafter 
set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth 
class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in- the existing City Limits, said point being the 
point of intersection of the existing City Limits with Beaver Grade Road ap- 
proximate^ 670 feet northwest of the west right of way of 1-75; thence North- 
easterly with the existing City Limits 640 feet, more or less, to the right of 
way of .1-75; thence Northeasterly with the right of way of 1-75, 900 feet, more 
or less, to the right of way of, 1-71 Southbound ramp to 1-75; thence with the 
right of way curve to the left 1200 feet, more or less, to the southeast right of 
way of 1-71; thence Southwesterly with the 1-71 right of way 1680 feet, more 
or less, to a point 300 feet from Beaver Grade Road, thence 300 feet from an 
parallel to Beaver Road southeasterly 2650 feet, more or less, to the existing 
City Limits; thence Northwesterly with the existing City Limits 910 feet, more 
or less, to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sec- 
tion 81 JO and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and henceforth be considered 
as with the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

SECTION 4. All ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
the remaining sections of said ordinance would have been passed despite such 
invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 4 members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

«=> K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 and February 4, 11, 18, 1971 

ORDINANCE NO. 1971-2 
An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous tc* 
the existing North and West corporate limits of the City of Walton, Ken- 
tucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best intersest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present northwest corporate limits of the 
City, and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate 
territory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: * 

SECTION 1. That all the territory located within the boundary herein- 
after set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a 
fifth class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING AT the northeast corner of the existing City limits: thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of the C. N. O. & T. P. Railroad 
1060 feet, more or less, or sufficient to reach the north right of way of Ken- 
tucky No. 16; thence Easterly with said Kentucky No. 16, 100 feet, more or 
less, or sufficient to reach the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike; thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike 1220 feet, 
more or less, to the south right of way of Chambers Road; thence Northwesterly 
with the south right of way of Chambers Road 2300 feet, more or less; thence 
Southeasterly 300 feet, more or less; thence 300 feet from an parallel to 
Chambers Road southeasterly 1650 feet, more or less, to a point 300 feet from 
U. S. Highway No. 25; thence 300 feet from and parallel to U. S. No. 25 
southwesterly 2160 feet, more or less, to a point in the Parker tract; thence 
with the Parker tract and projection of sai d tract line southeas terl y 450 fo*, 
tQ the existing City L imits; the nce Northeasterly w ith the existing City Limits 
450 feet more or less; thence Southeasterly with the existing City Limits 340 
feet, more or less, to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in 
Section 81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statues, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

SECTION 4. All ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
the remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regu- 
meeting of Gouncil by a vote of 4 members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 and February 4, 11, 18, 1971 

jCOL.KENNER'SJ 
I Appliance Co. I 

5 5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440: 

; : 

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BankAmericard and .Master Charge Honored 



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j Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. ra to 6 p. m. | 

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Saturday, 10 a. * _.'.:: 5 p. m. 

^■■■■iiHsisasaBS!s=aBa2H==c===r====3z===! 



'Thursday, February 11, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



-ff-" 




>o~**3 



"I always ttraddle the whit* line, |utt le b« safe.' 
The Travelers Safety Service 



ABSOLUTE 

SATURDAY, FEB, 20, 1971 - 10:30 A. M. 

Located 5 Miles South of Warsaw, on Vera Cruz Road, approximately 
Y2 Mile West of Boone Road, and approximately 3 Miles from Warsaw 
and Sparta Exit of 1-71. Watch for auction and directional signs! 

Due to ill health and no longer able to farm, we will sell the following 
Real Estate, Cattle, Work Horses, Tools, Household and Miscellaneous: 
FARM consists of 129 acres (more or less), 1.03 acres tobacco base in 
1970, 10-acre com base. This farm is ridge and hill land, approximately 
85 to 90 acres tractor land, has some woods land, has approximately 40 
acres mixed hay, and is watered by 3 ponds and 5 springs. All of this 
farm is under good cattle fence and is fenced into eight different fields. 
Practically all in good grass and is a fine grazing farm. 

IMPROVEMENTS— Good frame house containing 5 rooms, plus utility 
room and bathroom. Has enclosed back porch with cistern, and a con- 
crete front porch. Good feed barn, 42 feet by 70 feet with electricity, 
practically new tobacco bam 36 feet by 44 feet with stripping room at- 
tached to barn. Has electricity and cistern at barn; 4,000 tobacco sticks 
to go with farm. Garage and work shop 20 feet by 24 feet, brooder 
house, chicken . house, smoke house with basement. This farm has ap- 
proximately 1 mile of road frontage on blacktop and gravel road. Well 
located, on school bus route, mail and milk route, in good community. 
Immediate possession will be given to this farm. Farm may be seen 
anytime before sale date by contacting Mr. and Mrs. Willie Osborne at 
the farm, Phone 606-643-5414. 

CATTLE — Whiteface cow, 3 years old, coming with second calf; 
Guernsey heifer, coming with first calf; 2-year-old Holstein heifer; Guern- 
sey cow; 7-months-old Brown Swiss heifer; 7-months-old Brown Swiss 
bull; yearling Holstein and Shorthorn bull (mixed). All cattle will be 
tested by date of sale. Team of good work horses, 10 years old, will 
work single or double, will weigh about 1200 lbs. each and are gentle; 
set good tug harness, saddle, bridle; 2-row com planter, rubber tired 
wagon with flat and bed, rounder plow, hillside plow, laying-off plow, 
cutting harrow, rastus plow, harrow-tooth plow, 62-tootli section harrow, 
mowing machine, No. 141 McCulloch chain saw, electric skill saw, elec- 
tric grinder, tobacco setter, and 12-foot aluminum boat; sledge hammers 
and iron wedge. 

HOUSEHOLD— 2-piece living room suite, platform rocker, Warm Morn- 
ing coal heater, radio, 2 metal beds with springs and mattresses, iron bed 
with springs and mattress, chest of drawers, dresser, coal stove, wood 
cooking stove, 4 bow back chairs, large refrigerator, dish cabinet, 2 wall 
cabi nets, 2 ba se c abin ets, double barrel shotgun (breech). 



ANTIQUES— Dishes, glass and china* goblets, tureen, some carnival 
glass dishes, oil lamps, sugar bucket, metal clock, rope-leg stand table, 
dresser, wardrobe, couch, stone churn and dasher, stone pitchers, stone 
crocks, comb case, iron dinner bell in good condition, dining room table 
and chairs, sideboard, picture frames, picture of old Carrollton bridge, 
dutch oven, old cook book (dates back to 1880), old iron kettle, 2 round 
iron kettles (15 gallons each), broad axe, knapping hammer, trunk, kraut 
cutter, comb and brush set, lot of flat irons, 2 wooden ice boxes (one 
large, one small with no paint), grass seed sower, plus many other items 
too numerous to mention. 

(Not Responsible for Accidents) 
—LUNCH TO BE SERVED ON GROUNDS- 
TERMS — Real estate, 20% of purchase price to be paid down on day 
of sale, balance of the purchase price to be paid on delivery of deed- 
deed to be delivered on or before 30 days from date of sale; personal 
property, cash! 

Mr. & Mrs. Willie Osborne, Owners 

Route 1 - Sparta, Kentucky Phone 606-643-5414 

PAUL NOEL — AUCTIONEERS— W. D. SULLIVAN 

Carrollton, Ky.— 732-6721 Warsaw, Ky.— 567-6331 



CARLISLE'S ?«e£ KIDS' 




Even heat, comfortable heat, 
efficient heat — throughout your 
home all winter with our fuel 
oil. Phone now for service. 



• LOCAL XtAMMAJUUb I"* 




-DEATHS- 

J. WALTER POOLE 

J. Walter Poole, 82, died Monday, 
Feb. 1, at Woodspoint Nursing Home 
at Florence. He was a resident of 
Poole Road, Verona. 

He is survived by six daughters, 
Mrs. Agnes Acra of Burlington, Mrs. 
Margaret Waddell of Covington, Mrs. 
Dorothy Bowin of Ft. Mitchell, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Herring of Walton, and 
Mrs. _Theresa Ryan and Mrs. Loretta 
Cuzick of Verona; four sons, Joseph 
and Lawrence Poole of Verona, Tony 
Poole of Williamstown, and Robert 
Poole of Independence; a sister, Mrs. 
Anna Kroger of Cincinnati, and four 
brothers, Msgr. O. L. Poole of Rich- 
mond, Ky., Raymond Poole of Bur- 
lington, Fred Poole of Van Nuys, 
Calif., and Raphael Poole of Shreve- 
port, La. 

Requiem High Mass was held at 
10:00 a. m., last Thurdsay, at All 
Saints Church, Walton. Burial was 
in St. Patrick Cemetery, Verona. 

Hamilton Funeral Home of Verona, 
had charge of arrangements. 

MISS MARY K. BLACK 

Miss Mary K. Black, 47, of 28 
South Main St., Walton, died Wed- 
nesday, Feb. 3, at St Elizabeth Hos- 
pital, Covington, following a long 
illness. 

She is survived by her mother, Mrs. 
Edith Black, of the same address. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Saturday at the Chambers ••& Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. Burial was 
in the Beaver Lick Christian Church 
Cemetery. 

CHARLES RICHARDS 

Charles Richards, 76, one of the 
t last blacksmiths in Boone County, died 
at 11:00 p. m., Tuesday, Feb. 2, in 
Booth Hospital, Covington. He lived 
on Highway 16, Verona, and was a 
veteran of World War I. 

He followed in the footsteps of his 
father in the operation of a blacksmith 
shop on Walton-Verona Road, shoeing 
horses, repairing wagons and sleds. He 
closed his shop during World War II. 

Survivors are his wife, Cora Ken- 
nedy Richards; a daughter, Mrs. Mary 
Spaulding of Covington; two sons, 
William E. Richards of "Verona, and 
Charles Richards of near Crittenden, 
and two sisters, Mrs. May Smith of 
Covington, and Mrs.Xee Hudson of 
Lansing, Mich. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
Saturday at the Hamilton Funeral 
Home, Verona. Burial was in New 
Bethel Cemetery, Verona. 

FREDERICK REQUARDT 

Frederick Requardt, 77, of 5306 
Madison Pike, Independence, died 
last Saturday at the Veterans' Hos- 
pital in Lexington. 

He is survived by two daughters, 
Mrs. Roberta Bramlage of Walton, 
and Mrs. Jeanine McKinley of Inde- 
pendence; a son, Clarence Requardt of 
Covington; a sister, Mrs. Mabel Arm- 
strong of Independence, and a broth- 
er, Edward Requardt of Covington. 

Services were held at 11 a. m., 
Wednesday in the Swindler Funeral 
Home, Independence. Burial was in 
the Independence Cemetery. 

MRS. HATTIE PRUETT 

Mrs. Hattie Pruett, 82, of Orlando, 
Fla., and a former well known Wal- 
ton resident, died Sunday, February 1-. 

She is survived by one son, Clifford 
C. Pruett, Orlando; three grandchild- 
ren, Beverly of Orlando, Jim of Jack- 
sonville, and Tom Pruett of Dover, 
Del., and six great-grandchildren. 

Services were held in Orlando. 

LEWIS C. STEPHENSON 

Lewis C. Stephenson, 79, of Wal- 
ton, a retired farmer, died last Sun- 
day at the Cincinnati Veterans Admin- 
istration Hospital. 

He is survived by a son, Charles 
Stephenson, Walton, and a daughter, 
Mrs. Laura Bush, Nashville, Tenn. 

Services were held at 10:30 a. m., 
Wednesday at the Chambers and 
Grubbs Funeral Home, Walton. Bur- 
ial was in Floral Hills Cemetery, Tay- 
lor Mill. 

OLUS VEST 

Olus Vest, 63, of 711 Garrard St., 
Covington, died last Sunday at the 
Veterans Hospital, Cincinnati. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Nancy Lewis Vest; a stepdaughter, 
Mrs. Myrtle . Hollon, Bromley; his 
stepmother, Mrs. Jessie Vest, Verona; 
a half-brother, Ralph Vest, Verona, 
and a half-sister, Mis. Edna Stephen- 
son, Walton. 

Services were held at 11:00 a. m., 
Wednesday at the Hamilton Funeral 
Home, Verona. Burial was in New 
Bethel Cemetery, Verona. 





Yet soy ya get a problem 
Ya don't know what to do 
Just put an ad in classified ; 
Dot's my advice to you. 



RATES OF WALTON ADVERTISER 



_60c per column inch 



Local Display 

Foreign Display. (6c per line) 84c per column inch 

Mats or Plates — Deadline Monday Noon 

Classified Ads, Cards of Thanks 50c minimum 

(2c per word if in excess of 25 words) —Payable In 
Advance. No Phone Calls. Deadline Tuesday, 10 a. m. 

— $1.00 per column inch 



Legal Advertising. 



—OFFICE HOURS— 

Monday-Friday_8 a. m. to 12 noon, 12:30 to 4:30 

Social News Deadline 12:00 Noon, Monday 

Phone 485-4962 



TREE AND SHRUB 
SEEDLINGS AVAILABLE 

Two Northern Kentucky Soil and 
Water Conservation Districts are mak- 
ing tree and shrub seedlings available 
for interested property owners. 

Packets consisting of Scotch Pine,. 
Bue Spruce, Russion Olive, Dodgood 
and Bush Honeysuckle, which control 
erosion, provide wildlife food and cov- 
er and beautify premises come in two 
sizes. 

One includes 50 seedlings and the 
cost is $10.50, while the other con- 
tains 25 and the cost is $6.50. 

Orders may be placed now with the 
local Soil Conservation District in; 
which you live — Boone or Kenton Co- 
unty S. C. D., 8671 Dixie Highway,. 
Florence, Ky. 

On Dean's List at NK 

Among students on the Dean's List 
at Northern Kentucky State College 
for the fall semester were three fromi 
our area. They are: 

Deborah DeGroot, Morning View? 
Michael Mullins, Morning View, and 
Donnie Murray, Verona. They had a 
3.5 average or better. 




Rump Roa st 
Pork Roast 



ROLLED $ 

READY FOR YOUR 
FREEZER _ LB. 



1.09 



BONELESS 
ROLLED 



LB. 



59c 



Sausage 



FRESH PORK 
HOME MADE ._.„ LB. 



49c 



SHELL-OUT BEANS, Honey Grove 15K-oz. size 15c 

WHITE HOMINY, While Villa 15-oz. size 13c 

TOMATO PUREE, White Villa large 19-oz. size 25c 



Peaches 



WHITE VILLA 

Sliced or Halves 

Large 29-Oz. Size 



29c 



AMERICAN CHEESE, While Villa pound 79c 

VEGETABLE SH0RTNING, While Villa Mb. size 69c 



Tomato Juice 



WHITE VILLA 
Large 46-Oz. Size 



29c 



BROWN & SERVE ROLLS 

COUNTY FAIR 



••••••••••••••.••a 



Special 



• •••.*••>•••••••••»• 



3 for $1.00 

Regular Price 43c 



Produce Department 

Head Lettuce 3% 249c 

FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OF $3.00 OR MORE 




Model 




Store 



FREE Delivery Every Morning — Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 
Two Deliveries On Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 6:00 p. m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 8:00 p. m., Friday and Saturday 



Phone 485-4991 



Walton, Kentucky 



^ 



<*** 



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k* 



# 



^ 



M><>V* 





mm® 



A Modemly-Equipped^ Weekly Newspaper t- Letter Press and Offset Printing Phone: 485-4962 
Serving A Progressive Community— Boone, Kenton, Grant & Gallatin Counties jqc Copy 



Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 7 



Bearcats Win and 
The Pioneers Lose 

Basketball games were cancelled on 
Tuesday of last week, due to the snow. 
However, action was resumes last Fri- 
day night. 

The Walton-Verona Bearcats en- 
tertained St. Thomas, and the 'Cats 
clung to their NKIAC lead, which 
they share with St. Henry, by, defeat- 
ing the visitors 89-60. The Bearcats 
are now 7-0 at home. They have five 
more conference games to play, four 
at home. 

W-V led throughout the contest, 
being in front 21-10 at the first per- 
iod, 43-22 at the half, and 64-40 at 
the end of the third peroid. 

For St. Thomas, Ryan had 11 
points and Hafele added 10. The 
Bearcats put five men in double fig- 
ures. Messmer led with 17 points, 
Goldsberry added 15, Sargent 14, and 
Ferguson and Ingram had 10 each. 

The Pioneers didn't fare so well 
Friday. Campbell County, who had 
won five games in a row before last 
Tuesday night's loss at Highlands, got 
back on the positive side of things 
with an 86-72 victory af the Simon 
Kenton gym. 

The winners led throughout, being 
in front 18-15 at the first quarter, 38- 
34 at halftime, and 61-48 at the third 
period. 

Craig was the big gun for Campbell 
County, scoring 31 points. Morris 
added 16, Ballinger 15, and Anderson 
13. Davis was tops for Simon Kenton 
with 31 big points, and Leistner add- 
ed 16. 

Body Management 
In At Beechgrove 

Kenton County's Beechgrove Ele- 
mentary School is the focal point of 
a new experiment in a program de- 
signed to discover physical deficien- 
cies in a student. 

Robert Taylor, Beechgrove principal, 
outlined the project called "body man- 
agement." 

In it a student is put through a 
series of simple exercises each morning 
to discover a lack of co-ordination, if 
any. Such defects are then compared 
with the child's academic achieve- 
ments. 

In tests thus far, teachers have dis- 
covered eye and ear problems which, 
in some cases, may be corrected with 
simple, exercises. In other cases, more 
serious treatment may be required. 

Failure to correct the deficiencies, 
Feechgfbve teachers report, may re- 
sult in a classroom lag even though 
the student has high capabilities. 

In recent weeks, members of the 
staff have observed similar classes in 
schools in Dayton, Ohio, where the 
program has been underway for sev- 
eral years with good results. 

Staff ordsburg Homemakers 

The Homemakers Club of Staffords- 
burg met at the church February 2nd 
with Mrs. M. M. Mann as hostess. 

When Mrs. L. J. Rapp went early 
to turn up the thermostat, she found 
the basement door blown ope n and 
the water pipes frozen. This was a 
bad situation, since the Oak Island 
Club were to be guests.. However, 
most of the members were present. 

The business meeting was held with 
Mrs. Rich asking for the devotion to 
be given by Mrs. Don Riddle, and 
based on the 23rd Psalm. 

Mrs. F. Keeney reviewed the book, 
"TR," which is the life Of Theodore 
Roosevelt. 

Among the visitors were: Miss El- 
ma Taylor, Mesdames Kathryn Gutt- 
ridge, Leontine Stephens, Elizabeth 
Barberick, Mary Jackson, R. R. Rector, 
Dorothy Ballinger, M. Noll, Dixie 
Dressman and children, F. Jackson, 
Alline Riddell and W. Huffaker. 

Members were: Mesdames M.Mann, 
G. Rapp, E. Ware, F. Elam, V. 
Lynch, K. Wharton, B. Hill, D. 
Nitschke, P. Pepoon and son, O. Shaw, 
M. Rich, S. Damico, F. Keeney, and 
a prespective new member, Mrs. R. 
Pitzer, and two children. 

The lesson on annual flowers for 
the U. S. was given by Mrs. Paul Pe- 
poon, who showed some beautiful 
slides, loaned by U. K. 

Social At Independence 

The Altar Society of St. Cecilia 
Church, Independence, will sponsor a 
social on Wednesday, February 24, at 
1:30 p. m., in the school hall. 



Southern States Meeting 
Is Held In Louisville, Ky. 

Southern States Cooperative's dollar 
volume, exclusive of grain marketing, 
for the first six months of the 197-71 
fiscal year showed a 12 percent in- 
crease over the same period last year. 

This information was contained in a 
report presented by John Henderson 
of Lexington, a regional manager of 
the cooperative, to members at a reg- 
ional board meeting held in Louisville, 
February 10. 

O. H. Campbell, Henderson, Ky., 
a director, presided at the session. 

Attending the meeting from this 
area were Chris Combs, manager of 
Boone County Farm Supply, Walton, 
local Southern States retail outlet, and 
board members Denny Jones and 
Kline Menefee. 

Volume for the organization, not 
including grain marketing, stood at 
$63,200,000 for the first half of the 
fiscal year, as compared to $56,300,000 
a year ago. 

HEART SUNDAY 



& 



U COMING UP 

Volunteers are still needed for the 
Heart Sunday canvass which is to be 
conducted in Walton and Boone Co- 
unty as the high point of the 1971 
Heart Fund Campaign here, it was 
announced by Marvin Kendall, Walton 
area chairman, and William Leicht, 
rural area chairman. 

"So that everyone in the commun- 
ity will have a chance to give, we 
hope to enlist the services of men 
and women who can find time to call 
on a few neighbors to advance the 
most vital health crusade of our time," 
said Dr. Ferd Metzger, Florence, co- 
chairman of the 1971 Boone County 
Heart Fund campaign. 

Boone County has a goal of $5,000 
as its contribution to the fight against 
diseases of the heart and blood vessels 
said Mrs. C. E. Whalen, Florence, co- 
chairman. She emphasized that al- 
though the heart and blood vessels 
are now responsible for about 53 per 
cent of all deaths in the nation, dra- 
matic progress has been achieved 
since the onset of massive research 
programs begun in 1950, a year after 
the first heart fund campaign. 

The Heart Fund campaign has been 
conducted throughout February, and 
reaches its climax with a residential 
visitation next Sunday — Heart Sunday! 

- ■ — — ' ■ ■■■■■■■ .i ■ 

MAKE HONOR ROLL 

Two Walton girls, Misses Diana 
Breeden and Beverly Coyle, were a- 
mong 239 Georgetown College stu- 
dents to qualify for th e "I 
Roll" during the first semester ef the 
current school year. A student earn- 
ing this honor must have a quality 
point average of 3.0 to 3.49. 

Miss Breeden is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Breeden, of 
Walton, Route 1, and she is a junior. 

Miss Coyle is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Andrew Coyle of 24 Beding- 
er Avenue, and is a sophomore. 



Seven Safeguards 
Of Cancer Cited 

Cancer killed nearly 330,000 Amer- 
icans last year, and an even greater 
number will die of this disease in '71 .[ 
Researchers seek clues to cancer's 
cause, physicians help cancer patients 
with increasingly effective treatment 
techniques. But still the figures rise.; 
What else can be done to halt them? 

"Every adult in Northern Kentucky^ 
can help," said Larry Newman, area, 
director for the Northern Kentucky. 
Unit of the American Cancer Society. 
Each of us has within himself the 
power to help cut down the number 
of cancer deaths in this area. 

If cancer is detected and treated 
early enough, it is one trf the most 
curable of diseases. There are seven r 
safety measures and everyone can take 
advantage of them. 

Newman detailed the seven safe- 
guards: All adults can help guard 
against lung cancer by not smoking 
cigarettes; from skin cancer by avoid- 
ing over-exposure to the sun; from 
colon-rectum cancer by having a proc-| 
to every year, especially from the age 
of 40; from cancer of the mouth by 
having dental examinations regularly. 
A woman can take two additional 
steps: To help protect herself from 
breast cancer, she should practice a 
breast self-examination each month, 
and for uterine cancer, she should 
have a Pap test each year. Finally, 
everyone should have an annual health 
checkup. 

Church League 
Basketball Results 

In the first game Saturday, the 
Methodists made the division rirSr 
closer by defeating the Christians, 81- 
69. G. J. Poore led the Methodists 
with 34 points, and Royce chipped in 
with 25. The Christians were led by 
Rick Stephens with 18. Holder, Noe 
and Mullins added 15 each. 

The second game was won by the 
local Baptists, 2-0, over St. Patrick— 
the result of a forfeit. 

The third encounter saw All Saints 
defeat the Church of Christ, 86-70. 
Bill Wethington led the winners with 
31 points. Mike Rust and Mike 
Wethington added 13 each. Marcum 
was tops for the losers with 27, and 
Humphries added 20. 

In the last game, Piner defeated 
Richwood, 77-66. Matteoli led the 
winners \vith 22 and Cook added 21. 
Jerry Feagan and Jim Houston led the 
losers with 17 and 15, respectively. 

is week^t 5i3J), St. Cecilia play s 
the Church of Christ; at 6:45, Hickory 
Grove tangles with All Saints; at 8:00, 
St. Patrick plays Richwood, and at 
9:15, New Bethel tangles with the 
Methodists. 

The league is having a slight short- 
age of funds, and it would be apprec- 
iated if more people would come out 
and support their church team. Thank 
you! 



THE COLTS 4-H HORSE 
AND PONY CLUB MEETS 

The first official meeting of; the 
Colts 4-H Horse and Pony Club" was 
held February 4, in Kenton County, 
at the home of Randy and Vickie 
Lemox. 

Officers were selected as follows: 
President, John Jehn; Vice-President, 
Randy Lemox; Secretary, Patti Max- 
field; Treasurer, Jay Jehn, and Re- 
porter, Paul Maxfield. 

The club looked over the booklet, 
"Horses and Horsemanship." A dis- 
cussion from this book on the color, 
kinds, breeds, color markings, and the 
parts of a horse. • 

The next meeting will be held at 
the home of Randy and Vickie Lemox 
on February 18. Some jnovies on 
horses will be shown, provided by 
William Zembrodt. 

Those who attended were Nancye 
Lemox, leader; members, John Jehn, 
Randy Lemox, Jay Jehn, Julie Jehn, 
Vickie Lemox, Laurie Buckner, Lisa 
Buckner, Sandy Isaacs, Darryl Isaacs, 
Anne Maxfield, Patti Maxfield. John 
Zembrodt, and Mark Zembrodt.— 
Paul Maxfield 

Happiness is like potato salad. 
When you share it with others you 
have a picnic. 

White's Tower PTA 

The White's Tower Elementary 
School PTA will hold its Founders' 
Day program on Thursday, Feb. 18th 
at 7:30 p. m., in the school cafeteria. 
All past presidents will be recog- 
nized. 

•fts part of the program, the Pro- 
tection Department of the John Shil- 
lito Company will present a film on 
shoplifting, "Silent Crime." The film 
deals with the problems of shoplifting 
and the consequence if caught. All 
parents are urged to attend with their 
children — it could happen to you! 

Baby sitting services are provided 
for the pre-schdol children. 

Walton Homemakers 

The Walton Homemakers Club will 
meet February 19th at 11:00 a. m., 
in the home of Mrs. Donald Rice of 
22 Alta Vista Drive, Walton. 

The lesson, "Annual Flowers," will 
be taught by Mrs. Lillian Acree and 
Mrs. Donald McMillian. 

Please bring your wool yarn pillow 
to the meeting. All members are urg- 
ed to be present, and visitors are wel- 
come. 

A Recognition Dinner 

A 5-year pin will be awarded Clara 
Smith, Florence, wTTen Booth Hospital 
administration holds its annual recog- 
nition dinner February 18. She is a 
member of the hospital's nursing staff. 

Two others in this area will be 
honored who have a total of 40 years 
of service— Donald Taylor of the hos- 
pital laboratory, and Hazel Lowe, al- 
so of the nursing staff. Both are from 
Erlanger. 



NFO's Hog-Lil 
Is In High Gear 

The -NFO's commodity "lift" oper- 
ations were overwhelmingly launched 
by delegates attending the recent Nat- 
ional Convention of the National 
Farmers Organization in Louisville. 

A statement from the organization's 
home office at Corning, Iowa, reports 
a flurry of preparations. According to 
the report, "The hog cattle and grain 
'lift' structure was hammered out at 
a 3 -day national board meeting and 
those plans were carried back home 
to the district level by directors. The 
'lift' operation was then fine-tuned by 
a session of administrative leaders rep- 
resenting all 50 of NFO's marketing 
areas across the U.S. -and- scores of 
veteran action men that will make up 
the 'hog lift' staff personnel were 
briefed and assigned areas of respon- 
sibility." 

Gene Potter, director of NFO's 
meat department, said, "We are now 
well into 'operation hog-lift' which is 
proving to be one of the most, effec- 
tive tools ever used by farmers to im- 
prove their general price levels." 

"Operation hog-lift" is designed to 
disrupt normal market and supply pat- 
terns, which forces buyers to be more 
aggressive in an attempt to maintain 
their supply, thus increasing the gen- 
eral price level. It is expected that 
buyers will try to buy off NFO mem- 
bers for a few cents per hundred- 
weight in an attempt to break up the 
volume moving through the collective 
bargaining structure. 

The NFO policy has already caused 
considerable strengthening in the hog 
market. 

DAR Selects Four 
Male Good Citizens 

Mrs. Francis J. Sayre, Regent, and 
Mrs. Helen Collins, Chairman of Nat- 
ional Defense, Boone County Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, have announced the names of 
the boys in four local high schools 
who will be awarded the Good Cit- 
izenship Medal. 

They are: Rick Palmiter, Boone Co- 
unty High, son of Kenneth Palmiter; 
Ronald Huffman, Walton- Verona High, 
son of Rev. Russell Huffman; David 
Hobbs, Lloyd High, son of James 
Hobbs, and Lee McNeely, Conner 
High, son of Lee McNeely. 

This contest is open only to boys 
who are graduating seniors. Method 
of selection is to have the senior class 
choose three boys and from these the 
faculty chooses one who is awarded 
this medal; * — — — « — <+• 



NEWS ARRIVED LATE 

Due to the fact that Monday was 
a holiday fpr the Post Office, we did 
not receive a good part of our mail 
until Tuesday, which resulted in some 
news being left out of this issue. We 
are sorry, but we do- not have time 
to set up much news on Tuesday. 

CHURCH MAKES PLEA 
FOR A LAD OF FOUR 

The New Banklick Baptist Church 
is making a public plea to citizens of 
this area to help a fOur-year-old boy, 
1 homas Lee Davis, who was born with 
a kidney defect. 

Doctors say it is impossible for him 
to live without a kidney transplant, 
and soon he will need a kidney ma- 
chine while waiting for the trans- 
plant. 

A spokesman for the church said 
this is a time for all Christians to 
stand together and lend a helping 
hand to a young child in need. Any 
General Mills coupons will be accept- 
ed. If you desire to send them to us, 
we will see to it that little Tommy 
will receive them on your behalf. The 
General Mills/coupons can be used to 
help purchase, a kidney machine. 

The youngster lives in San Jose, 
Calif., but the address of the church 
is 225 Banklick Road, Walton, 41094. 



February Meeting 
Of (apt. Lillard DAR 

The February meeting of the Capt. 
John Lillard Chapter, Daughters of > 
the American Revolution, was held at 
Harp House, Williamstown. Hostesses 
were Mesdames W. O. Blackburn, Lee 
Points, Milton Valentine, Misses Bet- 
ty Ackman and Florence Conrad. 

The Regent, Mrs. Charles Allphin, 
reviewed the President General's mes- 
sage, regarding the importance of Feb- 
ruary as the birth dates of great men. 
f In the National Defense report, Mrs. 
T. A. Peny said, "For all intent and 
purpose, Russia now has a naval base 
in Cuba." 

. In the flag report, Mrs. Abram 
Hedges said that it is an universal 
custom to display the flag only from 
sunrise to sunset, and on flagstaffs at 
night upon special occasions when a 
light is used. 

Mrs. Davis Gaines, a genealogist, 
member of the Boone County DAR 
and State Chairman of Good Citizens, 
was guest speaker. Her subject was 
Aims of Good Citizens. 

Miss Martha Blain introduced the 
high school seniors selected as DAR 
Good Citizens, their mothers, and 
school sponsors. Receiving the a- 
wards were Susan England of Owen 
County, Fontaine Atha of Grant Co- 
unty, and Connie Lovelace of Wil- 
liamstown. Miss England has the 
honor of being the winner in the 5th 
District. The pilgrimage to Frankfort 
honoring the Good Citizens will be 
April 10th. 

During the business session, the 
following were appointed delegates to 
the State Conference in Lexington: 
Mrs. Charles Allphin, Mrs. E. H. 
Martin, and alternates, Mrs. Lloyd 
Watson, Miss Louise Flege, Mrs. Ken- 
neth Green and Mrs. T. A. Peny. 
Delegates to the National Congress 
inJWashingtQn, which m e ets 4n-Apri4r 




Above are a few of the more than 300 participants in the 1971 Builders' and Appliance Dealers' Workshop, held in 
Louisville, January 26-28, and sponsored by the Owen County RECC, featuring national authorities who discussed 
new techniques: First row, James T. Hull, Hull's TV & Appliances, Alexandria; Jack Renaker, Electrician, Florence; 
Jack Hagedom, Hagedorn 6V Sons, Erlanger. Second row, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Lusby, Triple-L, Williamstown; Mr. and 
Mrs. L. M. Galloway, Independence. Third row, Bill Smith, Walton, Owen County RECC Industrial & Rural De- 
velopment; Joe Maus, Independence; Scott Keith, Owen County RECC Special Services. 



This is an annual award to those 
who possess to an outstanding degree 
the qualities of honor, service, cour- 
age, leadership and patriotism. 

The DAR believes that education 
of our youth in American Citizenship 
is of supreme importance for our 
National Defense, and to foster among 
students a greater appreciation of the 
qualities of citizenship needed by our 
country if it is to retain its sovereignty 
and independence of action. 

Walton-Verona PTA • 

The Walton-Verona- PTA will meet 
on February 22 at 7:30 p. m., in the 
high school at Walton. 

Founders' Day will be observed, and 
ah invitation is extended to all past 
presidents to be present. 

To Honor Speakers Bureau 

Thomas M. Houston, 1297 River 
Road, Hebron, will be honored for 
his voluntary contribution to Cincin- 
nati Bell's Speakers Bureau during a 
luncheon February 26. 

Houston is one of 26 telephone 
company employees who have parti- 
cipated in at least 10 speaking pro- 
grams for the bureau during 1970. 

Speakers and their wives will be 
guests of Cincinnati Bell during a 
luncheon in the Continental Room of 
the Netherland Hilton. 

Spaghetti-Meatball Supper 

The public is invited to attend a 
meatball and spaghetti supper, sponsor- 
ed by the Married Couples Class of 
the Independence Christian Church. 

Serving will begin at 4:00 p. m., 
Saturday, February 20th, and continue 
until 8:00 p. m. Adults $1.25, and 
children 50c. The menu will consist 
of meatballs, spaghetti, French bread, 
tossed salad, homemade pie, and drink. 

Egotist: An I-dropper. 



will be Miss Laura Dickerson and 
Mrs. Charles Allphin. Alternates are 
Miss Elizabeth Flege, Mrs. Jenny 
Poor, Mrs. Jerry Perry, Miss Martha 
Blaine and Miss Jarrett Perry. 

Named to the nominating commit- 
tee were Mrs. Robert Hume. Miss 
Louise Flege and Mrs. Bruce Cotton. 

Guests attending were: Mesdames 
Davis Gaines, Howard Hall, Fern 
Atha, Rebekah Juett, Margie England, 
Mary Lovelace, Sadie Whitaker, and 
Misses Susan England, Montaine Atha 
and Connie Lovelace. 

Members in attendance were: Mes- 
dames Margaret Fields, Charles All- 
phin, J. W. Bennett, W. O. Black- 
burn, Zayda Clore, B. C. Cotton, 
Marvin Conrad, Evan Hance, Abram 
Hedges, Robert Hume, John Juett, D. 
L. Lusby, E. H. Martin, Sally Odor, 
T. A. Perry, Kirtley Points, Jennie 
Poore, Ottis Readnour, J.JK. Valland- 
' ingTiam, Lloyd Watson; Misses Martha 
Blaine, Laura Dickerson, Elizabeth 
Flege, Louise Flege, and Vesta Mc- 
Nabb. * 

Founders' Day at Piner 

A Founders' Day program will be 
given at the Piner School auditorium 
on Thursday, Feb. 18, at 8 p. m. 

All past presidents have been in- 
vited, and they will be recognized. 

Also, a film, "What the PTA Is 
All About," will be shown. As a 
surprise, we are awarding a Life Mem- 
bership to someone special. 

The public is invited, so be sure 
and come out. Refreshments will be 
served in the cafeteria following the 
meeting. — Pub. Chm. 

Social at All Saints School 

The regular monthly social will be 
held Saturday at All Saints School, 
Walton, starting at 8:15 p. m. 

Everyone is welcome. Come, bring 
a friend and, see your friends. Re- 
freshments will be served. 



_■ 



■* 



-L. 



Thursday, February 18, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Wafton, Kentucky 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) _^ 

Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 - Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty' Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 

Assistant Editor 

Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch, Foreign Rate, 6c Per line. 




qemnq the riqht^rgrg 

(J* THE tZ«C£HTU/ZY B.C. THE EfiWVW KlWff RAM£5C5Ht 

HUNTED GAZELLES MOUNTED OM * LIGHT CHARIOT 
USING A LEVER WHICH JAMMED A "SHOE" 
AGAIMST THE WHEEL KIM WHENEVER 
HE WANTED TO *TOP.' 



Mrs. Jimmy Smith has returned to 
her home on South Main from the 
hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Mastin and 
Mr. and Mrs. Terry Webster were 
recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. Gratsie 
Whitton, Jr. and daughters of Er- 
langer. 

Mrs. Brenda Napier and daughter, 
Denise, have moved into their new 
home on High Street. 

Sympathy is extended to J. D. 
Burgess of South Main, in the loss of 
his wife, Mrs. Heimer Taggart Bur- 
gess. s ~* 

David and Jim Houston, J. L. and 
Jerry Feagan, Larry Ryan and Jack 
Alexander attended the Farm Show in 
Louisville, last Wednesday. 



Mr. and Mrs. Ray Brewster had as 
weekend guests, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Smith and daughter, Julie, .of Detroit, 
Mich. 

Be ready for your Heart Fund vol- 
unteer worker as they call on you this 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gault, Sr. of 
Nicholson Road, entertained Johnny 
Gault, III, of U. K. and two of his 
student friends, Roy' Castle of Louis- 
ville, and Jim Payne of Brandenburg, 
Ky., at dinner Tuesday evening. 

Mrs. Shirley Carpenter and two 
children spent the weekend with her 
aunt, Mrs. William Bertram, and Mr. 
Bertram of Winchester, Ind. 




11.6 ACRES — Boone County. Nice location, beauti- 
ful view _ Price $8,000.00 

2 BEAUTIFUL LOTS— Each 1.2 acres, lovely rural 
setting, good surroundings ... Price $2,500.00 each 
■ 

16 ACRES — In Walton. Gas, water, woods. Owner 
wants to sell. 



0*E OP THE EARLIEST B/CYCLES HAD A FROWT WHEEL 
THAT WAG 58 IMCHES AWD A REAR WHEEL OF 16 INCHES.' THE 

RESULT OF THIS 1715 PROPORTION WAS THAT SUDDEN BRAKING 
USUALLY TIPPED THE PIPER ON MIS HEAD f 

4 




t$ODAV, MANy 

EXPERTS FEEL THAT 
ATWOOD, WITH ITS SURGE 
HYDRAULIC BRAKING SYSTEM, 
HAS COKAE UP WITH THE SAFEST 
BRAKING SYSTEM IN THE TRAILER 
.INDUSTRY. SIMPLE HOOK-UP AND • 
\gELIAglL)T/ ARE ALSO KEY APVAMTA&Eg 





Gayle 

McElroy 

Realty 

33 Alto Vista Drive 

Walton, Kentucky 
Phone: 485-4297 



COL.KENNER'S! 

■ 

Appliance Co. \ 



i 5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440: 
: = 

j SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS, 5 
■ REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS, ETC. 5 

(Over 20 Years In the Service Business) 



Ben Baker of Chambers Road, was 
taken to St. Elizabeth Hospital, last 
Wednesday. 

Mary E. Wood of Binder Road, 
Union, was taken to St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, last Wednesday. 

Mre. Zella Mayhugh Walton is a 
patient in Booth Hospital, Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry Webster and 
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Gohje attended the 
ice show at Cincinnati Gardens on 
Saturday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Watts and 
family of Blytheville, Ark., spent sev-, 
eral -days this week with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Caldwell of 
North Main. 

Mr. and Mrs. Denny Lusby and 
daughters of Warsaw, were Sunday 
dinner guests of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Melvin Utley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Stephenson and 
sons, Todd and Shea, entertained on 
Thursday evening for Mrs. Edith Ham- 
ilton and Mrs. Mary Stephenson, the 
occasion being Joe's birthday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Stahl of Cov- 
ington, were the Sunday evening 
guests of her mother,' Mrs. Goldie 
Wood, and Tommy Black. 

Mrs. Claude Ashcraft is spending 
several days with her sister, Mrs. Lil 
Young, of Park Ave. 

Willard Pugh of Crittenden, is a 
patient in the Veterans Hospital in 
Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Osborn of Cin- 
cinnati, were the Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Bush. 



Bank America rd and Master Charge Honored 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG & COLEMAN GAS & OIL STOVES! 



! Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. ! 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 



Candid Weddings 

Color & Black & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, Walton 
485-4046 




COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERVICE! 




Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for Yon — 

Nie's Pharmacy 

ttl Highway between Independence and Nicholson 



Fred Cross of Silver Springs, Md., 
and a friend from Canada, spent the 
weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 

Kacaba. ' 

Mrs. Lee Naive entertained with a 
family dinner Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Allen of Lou- 
isville, and Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow 
Greene of Walton, visited their broth- 
er, Andrew Henry, Sunday at Bethesda 
North Hospital, Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Greene 
spent Sunday with her "parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Henry of Warsaw. 
Mr. Henry has been quite ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Stuard and 
daughter, Louise, were called to In- 
diana, due to the death of a cousin 
-of Mrs. Stuard. 

The youth group and , the choir of 
the Walton Christian Church attend- 
ed the choir sing by the Transylvania 
College choir, Lexington, at Florence 
Christian Church, Sunday- afternoon. 

"My dears," announced the matron 
at the bridge party, "my New Year's 
resolution is never to repeat gossip — 
so for heaven's sake, listen carefully 
the first time." 

CARD OF THANKS . . . 

The family of John Rich wants to 
thank all who sent flowers, cards or 
brought food, and anyone who helped 
in any way at the time of our bereave- 
ment; Chambers & Grubbs for their 
efficient service; Brother Johnson, who 
offi ci a ted, and Mrs. Conner for the 
music. May God bless each of you. 
VIRGIL RICH 
KENNETH RICH 
JOHN W. RICH 
EVELYN SETTERS 
lt-7* KATHRYN BROWN 




DISCOVER THE 

BIG DIFFERENCE 

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmimmmmmm 

IN LOW-COST AUTO 
INSURANCE 

You do save money with our 
Special Budget Automobile 
Policy. What's more, you get 
quality protect/on and 
hometown agency service 
. . . service you can count 
on at all times. 

Those plus benefits add up 
to a big difference for you. 

Call or writs lis today for 
full facts. 

J. B. JOHNSON 

93 North Main Street 

WALTON, KY. 

485-7102 

MJfjJ^ REPRESENTING 

/^AUTOMOBILE MUTUAL 
/INSURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE* COLUMBUS, OHIO I 

_ immm ^ amm _. i 

w iii i ' "in i . i iM Kummmmtm n 'i K i m> W 



Pvt. James • Shields spent the week- 
end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Shields, of Old Lexington Pike. 

Bill Ryan is ill at his home on 
Beaver Road/ 

Little Mike Kacaba spent Saturday 
with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 



Stanley Kacaba of North Main. 

Mrs. David Eddins and new baby- 
daughter, Anna Lee, arrived here last 
Thursday by plane to stay with her 
grandparents', Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
Caldwell, while her husband is serving; 
in Vietnam. 



TRULY HOMELIKE 

A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 



Independence, Ky. 
356-2673 



-SERVING ALL FAITHS- 



ABSOLUTE 

SATURDAY, FEB. 20, 1971 - 10:30 A. M. 

Located 5 Miles South of Warsaw, on Vera Cruz Road, approximately 
Yi Mile West of Boone Road, and approximately 3 Miles from Warsaw 
and Sparta Exit of 1-71. Watch for auction and directional signs! 

Due to ill health and no longer able to farm, we will sell the following 
Real Estate, Cattle, Work Horses, Tools, Household and Miscellaneous: 
FARM consists of 129 acres (more or less), 1.03 acres tobacco base in 
1970, 10-acre com base. This farm is ridge and hill land, approximately 
85 to 90 acres tractor land, has some woods land, has approximately 40 
acres mixed hay, and is watered by 3 ponds and 5 springs. All of this 
farm is under good cattle fence and is fenced into eight different fields. 
Practically all in good grass and is a fine grazing farm. ■ 

IMPROVEMENTS— Good frame house containing 5 rooms, plus utility 
room and bathroom. Has enclosed back porch with cistern, and a con- 
crete front porch. Good feed barn, 42 feet by 70 feet with electricity, 
practically new tobacco barn 36 feet by 44 feet with stripping room at- 
tached to barn. Has electricity and cistern at bam; 4,000 tobacco sticks 
to go with farm. Garage and work shop 20 feet by 24 feet, brooder 
house, chicken house, smoke house with basement. This farm has ap- 
proximately 1 mile of road frontage on blacktop and gravel road. Well 
located, on school bus route, mail and milk route, in good community. 
Immediate possession will be given to this farm. Farm may be seen 
anytime before sale date by contacting Mr. and Mrs. Willie Osborne at 
the farm. Phone 606-643-5414. 

CATTLE — Whiteface cow, 3 years old, coming with second calf; 
Guernsey heifer, coming with first calf; 2-year-old Holstein heifer; Guern- 
sey cow; 7-months-old Brown Swiss heifer; 7 -months-old Brown Swiss 
bull; yearling Holstein and Shorthorn bull (mixed). All cattle will be 
tested by date of sale. Team of good work horses, 10 years old, will 
work single or double, will weigh about 1200 lbs. each and are gentle; 
set good tug harness, saddle, bridle; 2-row com planter, rubber tired 
wagon with flat and bed, rounder plow, hillside plow, laying-off plow, 
cutting harrow, rastus plow, harrow-tooth plow, 62-tooth section harrow, 
mowing machine, No. 141 McCulloch chain saw, electric skill saw, elec- 
tric grinder, tobacco setter, and 12-foot aluminum boat; sledge hammers 
and iron wedge. 

HOUSEHOLD— 2-piece living room suite, platform rocker, Warm Morn- 
ing coal heater, radio, 2 metal beds with springs and mattresses, iron bed 
with springs and mattress, chest of drawers, dresser, coal stove, wood 
cooking stove, 4 bow back chairs, large refrigerator, dish cabinet, 2 wall 
cabinets, 2 base cabinets, double barrel shotgun (breech). 

ANTIQ UES — Di s h e s, glass and china, goblets, tureen, some carnival 
glass dishes, oil lamps, sugar bucket, metal clock, rope-leg stand table, 
dresser, wardrobe, couch, stone chum and dasher, stone pitchers, stone 
crocks, comb case, iron dinner bell in good condition, dining room table 
and chairs, sideboard, picture frames, picture of old Carrollton bridge, 
dutch oven, old cook book (dates back to 1880), old iron kettle, 2 round 
iron kettles (15 gallons each), broad axe, knapping hammer, trunk, kraut 
cutter, comb and brush set, lot of flat irons, 2 wooden ice boxes (one 
large, one small with no paint), grass seed sower, plus many other items 
too numerous to mention. 

(Not Responsible for Accidents) 
—LUNCH TO BE SERVED ON GROUNDS- 
TERMS— Real estate, 20% of purchase price to be paid down on day 
of sale, balance of the purchase price to be paid on delivery of deed- 
deed to be delivered on or before 30 days from date of side; personal 
property, cashl 

Mr. & Mrs. Willie Osborne, Owners 

Route 1 - Sparta, Kentucky Phone 6064S43-5414 

PAUL NOEL — AUCTIONEERS — W. D. SULLIVAN 

Carrollton, Ky.— 732-6721 Warsaw, Ky—567-6331 



IT'S HOME BUYING TIME! S 
MAKE YOUR DREAM HOME A REALITY 

We will be glad to help 
you own o home of your 
own. Stop at one of our 4 
convenient offices and we 
will tailor a low payment 
home mortgage ban to fit 
your budget. 

(-IRSTlrEDERAL 

Savinqs<£Loan Association 

OF COVINGTON 
5th 6r Main Streets— Covington, Ky. 




ELSERE, KY. 
3715 Dixie flltfhway 

DIXIE HIGHWAY- HJTH OP WALTON 



LATONIA, KY. 
36th & 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 18, 1971 



esmmf 




O KNOW THE USUAL 
SYMPTOMS I 

■ Prolonged, oppressive pain 
or unusual discomfort in 
the center of chest, behind 
the breastbone. 

■ Pain may radiate to the 
shoulder, arm, neck or jaw. 

■ The pain or discomfort is 
often accompanied by sweating. 
Nausea, vomiting and shortness 
of breath may also occur. 

■ Sometimes these symptoms 
subside and then return. 

Minutes count when heart attack 
strikes. Act promptly. 




© IF YOU CAN'T REACH DOCTOR, GET 
10 EMERGENCY ROOM OP HOSPITAL 
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. 

THIS NEWSPAPER joins your Heart Association In pre- 
senting the life-saving educational message shown above, 
and in asking your support of the Heart Fund Campaign. 



NORMAS BEAUTY SALON 




7252 Walton-Nicholson Rood Independence, Ky. 

INTRODUCES MISS CAROL JENKINS 

additional hair stylist. A 

— Two Operators Now On Duty to Serve You — 

Open Tuesday-Saturday, 9:00 a. m. to 7:00 p. m. 
PHONE 356-7420 



Due to inclement weather this sale had to be post- 
poned — It will be held on 

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24 - 10:30 A.M. 

Having decided to quit farming and having no further 
need for the following described items of Farm Equip- 
ment and Livestock, I will sell them at Auction on 
Wednesday, February 24, 1971, located 8 Miles North- 
east of Warsaw, Ky., 2 Miles off U. S. 42, on Ross 
Road, Gallatin County — watch for auction signs! 

EQU'°MENT— 1966 John Deere No. 1020 diesel trac- 
tor, live power (3PTH), John Deere manure loader, 2 
sets 14-inch breaking plows, John Deere corn planter 
(3PTH) with fertilizer attachment, tobacco setter 
(wheel type), 1964 International No. 404 tractor with 
3PTH in good condition and new rubber, 2-row corn 
planter, No. 46 International hay baler (3PTH), hay 
rake 2 years old, New Idea fertilizer spreader, New 
Idea manure spreader (120 bu.), 1964 International 
No. 140 tractor, 1-row cultivator, 24' hay elevator, 
Ford mower (rear type, 6' cut), Ford disc (lift type), 
wagon with 14' flat and corn racks, farm water pump, 
lot hose, Wilson bulk milk tank (250-gallon), electric 
water heater (50-gallon), 2 stainless steel wash vats, 
2 sets Unico milkers (double units), set Ford culti- 
vators, lot steel barrels, 300-gatlon diesel fuel tank 
with pump, set single unit Surge milkers, milking ma- 
chine pipeline and pumps, cucumber spraying outfit, 
lot small tools, approximately 500 bales mixed hay. 

23 HEAD CATTLE— 8 head Holstein cows (4 to calve 
in February) 6 of which ore to drop 3rd calf; 3 15- 
months-oJd Holstein heifers; 15-months-old bull; 11 
head feeders (Holstein, Charolais and Hereford) 300 
to 400 pounds. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Mclnfyre, Owners 

Warsaw, Kentucky 
AUCTIONEERS: 

William D. Sullivan & Paul Noel 

Warsaw, Ky.— 567-6331 Carrollton, Ky.— 732-6721 

TERMS: CASH 

(Not Responsible For Accidents) 

— — — — — — — — — — — — — , || I 






Home 
Agent's 
Party 
Line 

By 

Nancy Norman 

What are the best annual flower 
varieties for Kentucky conditions. The 
answer is not as simple as some gard- 
eners might think, says Dr. Darrell 
Apps of the University of Kentucky, 
where he is an Extension Specialist in 
Horticulture. 

Dr. Apps presented a lesson on 
growing annual flowers to Boone Co- 
unty Homemaker Lesson Leaders re- 
cently. Annual flowers will be the 
topic studied by the ojub during the 
month of February. 

Dr. Apps adds, "Our methods for 
growing flowers at the University often 
differ from those used by homeown- 
ers. We grow all our annuals in beds 
covered with black plastic for mois- 
ture retention and weed control. Us- 
ually, we think of this method as a 



cultural asset, but the plastic is just 
too hot for some plants. An example 
is the sweet alyssum varieties, which 
do very poorly in our garden. Home 
gardeners on the other hand, usually 
have much better luck with this plant. 
Another danger in majung recom- 
mendations is the fact that data from 
our Lexington location is not always 
applicable to all other areas of the 
state. We have many geographical 
areas in Kentucky with different soil 
types and weather conditions. Natur- 
ally, we expect different variety re- 
sponses in different locations. 

Keeping in mind these factors, we 
are nonetheless presenting to you some 
recommendations to help you select 
annuals based on trials in our Land- 
scape Garden Center. Since the All 
America varieties are -.most advertised, 
we've objectively mentioned the se- 
lections and their merits for the last 
two years. Of the All Americas for 
1970 and 1971, we're most impressed 
with Snapdragon "Little Darling." 
Frankly, the Peter Pan Zinnias have 
just not performed at Lexington; how- 
ever, you should still try them. In 
fact, we'd be interested in»hearing your 
results. 

All America Selections for 1971 are 



MANEUVERING 
IN WASHINGTON 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 

U. S. Congressman 

4th District, Kentucky 



Following immediately upon his 
State of the Union message, the Pres- 
ident has begun an intensive campaign 
to persuade members of Congress to 
support his programs, or goals, during 
the next 2-year session. These meet- 




as follows: Hibiscus "Southern Belle"; 
Hollyhock "Silver Puffs"; Snapdragon 
"Little Darling"; Zinnia "Peter Pan 
Pink" and "Peter Pan Plum." 

For a list of other Meritorious var- 
ieties of annual flowers, please write 
or call the Extension Office, 586-6101 
(Extensions 17 and 18), or Box 218, 
Burlington, Ky. 41005. 

School Menu ... ~ 

Walton-Verona Schools 

Feb. 22 — Frankfurter, sauer kraut, 
mashed potatoes, gingerbread with 
sauce, bread, butter, milk. 

Feb. 23 — Salisbury steak, buttered 
corn, potatoes An Gratin, jello, milk. 

Feb. 24 — Pork barbecue on bun, 
cole slaw, baked beans, chocolate pie, 
milk. 

Feb. 25 — Creamed turkey, dress- 
ing, buttered peas, mixed fruit, bis- 
cuits, butter, milk. 

Feb. 26 — Fish, macaroni, cheese, 
green beans, hot combrcad, butter, 
milk, orange. 

CARD OF THANKS . . . 

We want to thank everyone for the 
prayers, cards, calls, flowers, visits, and 
the many kindnesses shown us while 
Joe was in the hospital and since re- 
turning home. May God bless vou 
all. 

JOE & ALINE DANCE 
lt-7* 



HOMEUTE XLs 

are the fastest 

selling chain saws 

in the world! 




HOMEUTE 
XL-12 

• Weighs only 12 lbs. 12 oz. less bar 
and chain 

• Cuts 12" trees in 10 seconds! 

• Easy to start — easy to handle 

• Fells trees up to 3 feet in diameter 
Get a free demonstration today I 




Famous Homelite XL 
is so light you can 
bHanwItlnonehandl 



RYAN HARDWARE AND 

IMPLEMENT COMPANY 

Walton, Ky. 



ings are for both Representatives and 
Senators, Republicans and Democrats. 
The meetings, usually held at the 
breakfast hour, are led off by the 
President. During this period the 
President and three or four of his 
advisors sell — hard — the major points 
of the program. The length of time 
does not allow questions. These in- 
itial briefings are to be followed by 
further two-way exchanges. 

The President appears to be intent- 
ly determined that: 

1 — The Federal government must be 
transformed if national problems are 
to be solved. 

2 — Major changes must be made in 
the distribution, and utilization of Fed- 
eral funds. 

3 — People must participate more 
widely and effectvely in the resolution 
of national problems. 

The President has taken a bold in- 
itiative in trying to guide his pro 
posals through the Congress, but it is 
already obvious that partisan maneuver- 
ing has developed. 

And, understandably, members of 
Congress are skeptical. We need to 
explore every possible weakness in the 
new proposals before endorsing them 
as individuals, committees, or political 
parties. However, I do believe that 
each of the proposals deserves a fair 
hearing — and that the pros and cons 
should be brought out loud and clear. 

Congress must be convinced of the 
wisdom of a new approach to the 
present relationship between the Fed- 
eral government and the states and 
localities. People generally realize that 
changes are needed to rehim consti- 
tutionally assured power to the states 
and localities. But the Federal gov- 
ernment has a direct responsibility in 
many areas — such as the environment, 
crime, social security, highways and 



the like — which require a government- 
al partnership. 

First and foieinost, though, the 
.taxpayer needs to be assured that who- 
ever uses his money, uses it efficiently 
and — wisely. 



DO YOU KNOW ... 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As Low As $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM.WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market. 



£ 



B. C. » D. 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHtmE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 



CARD OF THANKS— 

Thanks to all who were concerned 
about me while in the hospital; for 
the prayers, cajds, letters; for the 
many visits from the doctors, ministers, 
friends; special thanks to the neigh- 
bors who were so willing to help out 
in any way, and to the wonderful 
nurse's staff at Booth Hospital. May 
God- bless each of you. 
lt-7* —STANLEY OVERBAY 

CARD OF THANKS— 

The family of Claude C. Bums, Jr. 
wishes to express gratitude to all of 
those who in any way assisted at the 
time of his passing and since. The 
mahy deeds p£ kindness, the flowers, 
fo^d, and caiMs are sincerely appreci- 
ated. 

THE CLAUDE C. 
lt-7' ; BURNS, JR. FAMILY 



NOTICE FOR BIDS- 

Bids are now being taken by the 
Walton-Verona Board of Education 
(Superintendent's Office), to be open- 
ed March 11, 1971, during regular 
board meeting, on one space gas heat- 
er which has been used in the band 
room. Good condition. Ideal for gar- 
age or other small area such as cot- 
tage or trailer home. Board reserves 
the right to reject anv or all bids. 

2t-7c 



10 MINUTES to Industrial Park, Florence; new brick i 
home, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, large family room, fire- J 
place, 2-car garage, 95 / x300' lot $25,600.00 i 

85 Vi ACRES, near Verona, Ryle Road; modern farm j 
house, all land is clean and in good grass, 1-acre i 
tobacco base; dairy equipment with farm ..$28,000.00 J 

COLONIAL 2-story house, needs restoring, 2 acres of ■ 
land or 7 acres of land -J. $1 4,500.00 g 

15Vi ACRES, nice building sites, in Veronoy-city water. | 
Priced at $1 4,500.00 j 

200-ACRE Farm, State Route 16 _ Make offer | 

TOM HODGE REALTY j 

VERONA, KY. PHONE 485-7362 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 



Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax report service 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where 1971 changes were taught. 
He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE! 



BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 - 1 Mile South of Walton 
Phone 356-2172 



KENTON COUNTY, Old Decoorsey, near White's Tower; 67 acres of 
level to rolling land, ideal for subdivision or farming. Full price $800 
per acre. Will not split. To settle estate. See signs! 

MADISON PIKE, Pleasure Isle; 2 acres, 5-room modern home, basement, 
oil furnace; immediate possession. Full price $13,200, $1,800 down, 
balance $125.00 per month. See sign! 

SPECIAL! 3 Acres, 4 bedroom stucco home, no basement, oil furnace, 
stationary tubs, tile bath, built-in kitchen with stove, small bam, pond, 
chicken house; located on Dixon Road, near Pinet School. The price 
is $12,500, with $3,500 down. 

1 ACRE, 3 bedroom brick, Aill basement; last house on left, Wayman 
Drive. Price $21,000. 

8 ACRES, Fowler's Creek Road, near Route 17; suitable for mobile 
home parking. Price $3,950. Terms, $1,500 down. 

f>Vi ACRES, Kenton and Visalia Pike, near the Staff ordsburg Methodist 
Church. Price $7,500. Terms, $2,000 down. 

19 ACRES, 5-room semi-modern home, near Oak Ridge Baptist Church, 
Route 16. Make offer. $36,000. 

44 ACRES, no buildings, on Bramlage Road, near REA, 4 miles from 
Industrial Park. May consider splitting. Price $44,000. 

58 ACRES (more or less), 5-room modem frame home, 1 bam 36x36, 
IVi-acre fishing lake, Vi-acre tobacco base; 2-room cottage; gas and 
water, perfect for business or subdivision, across from REA building, 
Walton-Nicholson Pike. Price $69,000. Will consider split. 

144 ACRES, 2 bams, fair fence, plenty water, 2 -acre tobacco base, 9-acre 
corn base, 35 acres creek bottom, plenty blacktop road frontage; ideal 
spot to build a new home; located on State Route 159, 7 miles East 
of Falmouth, \Vi miles North of Kincaid Park. Owner Leo Ryan. 
Full price $23,750. 30% down, balance 18 years. 

90 ACRES, Grant County, Crittenden, (more or less), 5-room house, 
bam, 1-acre tobacco base, near city water and new golf course. Ideal 
for developing. 

2Vi WOODED ACRES, Piner, near Baptist Church. Pull price $2,750. 
Terms, $1,500. See sign. 

REL S. (BUCK) WAYMAN 

FORMERLY OF REL C. WAYMAN & SONS - 356-5068 

Real Estate Sales of All Kinds — Including Auctions 



« <> T £W AGENTS: 



Thomas Mershon— 356-9093 



Jerry Hatfield— n -5 546 



Thursday, February 18, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



1 Group of Men's White Dress Shirts, 
odds and ends ... your choice $2.00 

54-Inch Wide White Duck Material, 
heavy duly, reg. 89c yard, good for 
!! now only 29c - 4 yds. $100 

All .Boys' and Men's Sweaters, 

reduced One-Third 

• 

All Ladies' Winter Coats, now 

reduced to One-Half Price 

(All Weather Coals Not Included) 



SPECIALS 

t 

1 Group of Ladies' Sweaters, values 
to 8.98 now only $2.00 

1 Group of Girls' Sweaters, values 
^ to 5.98 ..... your choice MW 

Benton -Bonar 

65 N. Main St., Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4495 



Men's and Boys' Lined Winter 
Coats reduced One-Third 

1 Group of Men's Champ Dress Hats, 
reg. 9.95 to 12.95 now x k Price 

All Winter Coats, Girls' Sizes 2 : 14, 
now reduced One-Third 

Men's Insulated Coveralls, 
reduced One-Third 

All Corduroy Material In Stock, 
now only ..!.., :.. 66c yard 



Notes of Servicemen 

Harold L. McNay, 21, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Guy E. McNay, 27 McMil- 
lan Drive, Independence, recently was 
promoted to Army Specialist Four 
while serving with the 1st Cavalry Di- 
vision 'Airmobile) in Vietnam. 

Sp. McNay is assigned as a wheeled 
vehicle mechanic in Battery E of the 
Division's 82nd Artillery near Phuoc 
Vinh. He entered the Army in July 
of 1969, completed basic training at 
Ft. Gordon, Ga., and was last station-, 
ed at Ft. Richardson, Alaska. 

His wife, Carol, lives at 5304 Madi- 
son Pike, Independence. 



BIRTHS— 



Born to Bobby and Barbara Fish of 
Walton, Route 2, a son, at 6:57 a. 
m., February 8th, at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Covington. 

Born to John and Patricia Locke of 
7 Lorceo Ave., Walton, a daughter, 
at 12:56 p. m., February 9th, at St. 
Elizabeth Hospital, Covington. 

4-H State Runnerup 

Chela Richardson, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Lybran Richardson, Inde- 
pendence, is state runnerup in the 
4-H Club Award of Excellence pro- 
gram. She is a member of the Jet 
Set 4-H Club. 

The program was sponsored by the 
Courier-Journal and Louisville Times. 

Two detectives were standing over 
the body of a man named Juan Gon- 
zales. "How was he shot?" asked one 
detective. "I thing it was a golf gun," 
said the other. "But what is a golf 
gun?" "I don't know exactly, but it 
sure made a hole in Juan." 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We want to thank everyone, neigh- 
bors and friends, for their kindness to 
our family, shown during the loss of 
our loved one, Mary K. Black. And 
thanks to everyone who brought food, 
sent flowers and,, said prayers. Wc 
send a special thanks to Dr. William 
Waller, Ur. Kumpe and Dr. Vesper, 
and to the nurses on the second floor 
at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Chambers 
and Grubbs, Rev. Roy Johnson, Rev. 
A. J. Russell, and the pallbearers. May 
God bless each one. 
lt-7* —EDITH BLACK cV FAMILY 



50 Years In Eastern Star 

On February 4th, Walton Chapter, 
No. 161, OES, entertained with an 
Open House for Mrs. Mary Stephen- 
son, who has been a member of this 
order for 50 years. 

A beautiful 50-year pin presentation 
was made by Past Matron Margaret 
Fields. Past Matron Mildred Cleek 
gave a few mementos of Mrs. Step- 
henson's life, which was highly enjoy- 
ed by all. Past Matron Evelyn Size- 
more presented her with an oil paint- 
ing, a gift from the chapter. 

Mrs. Stephenson received gifts and 
best wishes from her many friends and 
members of the Walton Chapter, 
where she has been a devoted mem- 
ber for 20 years. 

Boone County Lincoln 
Day Dinner, Feb. 23rd 

The Boone County Lincoln Day 
Dinner will be held Tuesday evening, 
February 23, at. 7:00 p. m., at Hungry 
Jack's Smorgasbord, Highway 25 and 
Industrial Road, Florence. 

Principal speaker will be Tom Em- 
berton, now officially in the race for 
Governor of Kentucky. 

Northern Kentucky's Ken Harper, 
newly-appointed Secretary of State, the 
first Northern Kentuckian to hold a 
state office of this caliber in many a 
decade, is to be present. 

Tickets are $3.00 each and are 
available from Mrs. Frances Clements, 
384-3352, or Miss Wanda Dibert, 
371-5113, or by contacting members 
of the Boone Republican organiza- 
tions. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

Stanley and I want to thank all 
our friends who were so kind and 
thoughtful to us during my stay in 
Booth Hospital, and since returning 
home. Thanks for the lovely flowers, 
cards, and food. Sincerely, 

lt-7c -IRENE BUSH 



NOTICE- 



Notice to Bullock Pen Water Dis- 
trict Customers-— 

On January 16, 1971, the Public 
Service Commission of Kentucky at 
Frankfort, approved the proposed water 
rate scheduled as filed. 

The new rates are in effect as of 
February 1, 1971. (Pub. 2/18/71) 




i) K THE EA^LV PAVS 

OF A&WfUtTURE , LITTLE 
VALUE VvA£ PLACED ON THE- 
6KA$£ THAT WAS UAWD-CUT 
WITH CPUPE SCVTHE& AkJP 
piACEC IN THE MOW WITH A 
piTCHfOPK.TDPAY WE AEE 5TILL 
ABLE TO PLACE AM ESTIMATE OF HIGH 
VALUE ON THINGS 0Y SAYIW&..:'THAT AlkJ T HAY. 




gECOME THE NATION'S- 
LrAPIN& MR 'CULTURAL 
PRopUtT IN VALUPAVPSI^H 
*N g>CLAM.ATlON NO WMER. 
&AIZ1ZIEP WEIGHT. MOUSES 
WERE THE MAINSTAY OP 
TRA^POKTATION ACROSS THE 
COUNTRY AMP HAY WM THE 
pUEL THAT KEPT AMERICA MOVm. 



t«?UE VALUE OF THE- 
NATION'S HAY CfZOP HAS 

£EEN ENHAWCEP 0Y 

THE USE OF MOPEPN 

HAYMAICJU& EQUIPMENT 

KKETHE. 
NEW HOUCANP- .HAY&INE* 

MOWER-CONPITIONEBL 

WHICH CONPITI0W5 

AS tT CUT5 

AHP W'WPROW* OK SWATHS IT 




LOSE DRIVER LICENSES 

Listed below are the names of in- 
dividuals who have lost their drivers 
license for the week ending Feb. 5, 
as released by the Department of 
Public Safety to the Traffic Safety 
Coordinating Committee, Frankfort: 

BOONE COUNTY: Wilson Beck- 
nell, 42, of Route 1, Petersburg, un- 
til July 25, 1971; Connie A. Adams, 
29', of 8698 Dixie Highway, Florence, 
until July 11, 1971; Robert Schaum, 
42, of 30 Scott Drive, Florence, until 
July 11, 1971; Joseph L. Martini, 36, 
of 83 High St., Walton, until July 12, 
1971;Michael W. Mabley, 19, of 1 
Rosetta Drive, Burlington, until July 
7, 1971. 

Walton Masons to Meet 

Walton Lodge, No. 719, F&AM, 
will hold its regular monthly business 
meeting on Thursday, February 18, at 
8:00 p. m. There will be work in the 
E. A. degree. All members are urged 
to be present, and visitors welcome. 
Refreshments will be served after the 
meeting. 




COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
Vi ACRE 

-by- 
JOE CLAXON 



Due to the uncertain future of the 
1971 corn crop, brought on by the 
Southern Com Leaf Blight situation, 
farmers are asking many questions on 
which we have no data to answer. 
This being the case, about the best 
we can do is offer some thoughts and 
suggestions concerning some cultural 
and fertility practices which may be 
helpful to corn producers about the 
1971 com crop. These are presented 
as guidelines and are not recommen- 
dations. What each farmer ultimately 
does will largely be dependent on how 
much risk he is willing to take on 
the 9171 crop, so these suggestions 
should be considered in terms of each 



farmer's individual program. 

We don't think farmers should in- 
crease their plant populations for 1971 
above that used in 1970. Final plant 
stands of around 16,000 to 18,000 
plants per acre might be considered 
only if hybrid 100 percent N-cyto- 
plasm seed is available. Keep in mind 
that a decrease in plant population 
will not result in straight line de- 
crease in yield. 

Indications are that the com leaf 
blight ungus will overwinter in Ken- 
tucky and be present for the 1971 
crop. For this reason, it will be very 
important to get a vigorous plant 
stand as early as possible. Early plant- 
ings have been shown to have a high- 
er yield potential and if infection by 
the blight is slow or delayed, earlier 
plantings would have an advantage. 
Also, an earlier planting will give the 
grower a little more flexibility in de- 
ciding what to do if blight does be- 
come a problem by early summer. 

On the whole, we don't think that 
fertilizer rates should be altered for 
1971. This would especially be true 



with N-cytoplasm cpm and blend corn 
with a hight percent of N-cytoplasm 
(70 percent or above). Both types of 
com have high yield potentials and 
should be fertilized accordingly. If a 
grower fertilized heavily with P-K last 
year and didn't harvest much com due 
to blight and wonders if P-K should 
be applied this year, he should im- 
mediately pull a soil sample to deter- 
mine the P-K levels in the soil. This 
will provide the best basis for decid- 
ing whether or not to fertilize with 
P-K for the 1971 crop. 



4-H Horse & Pony Club 

"The Colts," a new 4-H Horse and 
Pony Giib has been announced for 
Kenton County. 

The group will have discussions, 
demonstrations, movies, take trips, and 
various other interesting activities to 
help them leam about horses. 

If you are between the ages of 9 
and 19 and love horses, you are in- 
vited to join. Please contract Nancye 
Lemox at 356-2465 for information. 



Mr. Merchant: 



Here are TEN Solid Fads You Should Consider 
In Planning Your Advertising: 

1 — This newspaper is an advertising medium that is WANTED — it is sought after and paid for, and the 
advertising in it is not an intruder in the home. 

2 — Nearly all of this newspaper's circulation is CONCENTRATED in this trading area. 

3 — The newspaper provides PENETRATION in the primary market by reaching virtually every family or 
customer hf'that market. 

4 — People read newspaper ads when they are ready to make a decision and to act — WHEN THEY'RE 
READY TO BUY. 

5— The newspaper is convenient; it may be consulted at a time most CONVENIENT to every member of 
the family. 

6— People LIKE TO READ NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS— surveys show that 85 percent of Hie people 
want their newspaper to contain advertising. 

7 — Every issue of every newspaper contains INFORMATION AND PICTURES of interest to every mem- 
ber of the family. 

8 — Newspaper reading is a habit and a part of people's routine. 

9— The printed word is MORE RELIABLE THAN the spoken word and it cannot be refuted because it is 
easily available for re-checking. More accurate information is obtained by reading than by listening. 

TO— The newspaper is ideal for comparison — items in a new newspaper may be easily compared with items 
in other newspaper ads. 

THE MOST EFFECTIVE and MOST ECONOMICAL 

WAY TO PROMOTE BUSINESS IS THROUGH 

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING! 



WALTON 




WALTON, KENTUCKY 



TELEPHONE 485-4962 



' J " ■ HU P » 1 






■>- 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 18, 1971 




SECTION «jm? 



•Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mam charge of 50c for 25 words or 
lees— over 25 words, 2 cents per 
word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



for Sale— 



."FOR SALE— 2 registered Polled Here- 
ford bulls; Polled Hereford heifer; 
set 12-inch breaking plows for a 
Farrfiall 100-140. 356-5894. lt-7* 

FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 

, diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 

Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 

542-4007. tf-49c 

TOR SALE— 1970 mobile home, two 
bedrooms, air ; conditioner, deep 
freeze and television included; only 
9 months old. Call 356-9816 or 
654-2931 after 5 p. m. 2t-7* 

TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— 1953 Ford Vi-ton truck 
with 1960 292 cu. in. engine, runs 
good, $175.00. 485-7360. lt-7* 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing 
of all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 
249-A Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. tf-3c 

OVERBAY'S ANTIQUES— Collector 
items, bought and sold. Marble-top 
dressers, ice cream chairs and tables, 
round-top oak tables. Va Mile South 
■Sii Verona, on Highway 16. Phone 
485-4049. 5t-7* 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-lOc 



FOR SALE — Two Charolais bulls, one 
7/8 and one graded. Marvin Mul- 
lins, 356-9816. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE — Two country hams, will 
weigh about 12-15 lbs., 2 years old, 
sugar cured. 485-4422. 2t-7c 

FOR SALE — Trombone, needs new 
case, $35.00. Call after 5:00 p. m., 
Jim Lawrence, 493-5433. tf-6 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE — Two springer heifers, to 
be fresh by first of March. Phone 
359-4703. lt-7* 



—CHAROLAIS— 

If You Like Charolais, Visit the 
LAZY J FARM, FISKBURG, KY. 

J. B. Spcgal fir Son 

Phone 356-7537 



FOR SALE 

400 to 450 bales of first 
cutting clover hay. Same 
amount of wheat hay. 

90c per bale. 

356-6218 ' 



FOR SALE — Charolais bulls, 7/8, 
15/16 and purebred French blood 
line from Ali Baba Dessauny; also 
some heifers. J. B. Spegal & Son. 
Phone 356-7537. 4t-5* 

FOR SALE— Super "C" Farmall trac- 
tor, 2-row cultivators, mower, plows 
and disk harrow, wagon. Irvin 
McClanahan, Williamstown. Call 
823-6691. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE] — 2 acres, 5-room frame 
house, Wilson Road, Independence, 
$10,000. Rubbe Realty Company. 
356-9250. tf-6c 

FOR SALE — International 27 hay 
baler, like new. 359-4346. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE — Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vaccinated. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

, tf-2c 

FOR SALE— 15/16 Charolais bulls, 20 
months old. Call 485-4493. 2t-7* 

NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE— 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cash registers, 
and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also carry 
ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. For free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. tf-8c 



"M" FARMALL tractor, in A-l con- 
dition, for sale or trade for small 
tractor with cultivator; also John 
Deere "A" tractor. Call after 7:00 
p. m„ 356-7667. 2t-7* 

* a 

FOR SALE— 1965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 

ZIG ZAG SEWING MACHINE- 
All built-in features, automatic bob- 
bin winder, monograms, buttonhole, 
sews on buttons. Two-tone paint, 
almost new, will sell for only $34-40 
cash; may consider terms. Phone 
689-7936. 2t-7c 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

FOR SALE — Toy Pomeranian puppies, 
AKC champion blood line, males 
and females, red, blue, blond and 
white. Joe A. Kannady, Elliston, 
Ky. 41038. 2t-6* 

ELECTROLUX SWEEPER — Real 
good condition, with all cleaning 
attachments, "even has spray gun, 
only $19.80 cash; may consider 
terms; must sell. Call 689-7936. 

2t-7c 

FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5-speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 

REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impala Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone, 
Ky. tf-47 



LOST- 



LOST— Strayed from home, 2 young 
Foxhounds, black and white spotted, 
one male, one female, about 18" 
high, no collar. Stanley Kacaba, 
Walton. 485-4046. lt-7c 



Wanted- 



WANTED — Non- drinking adult 
Christian couple to live in my 
home. All utilities paid. Mother 
partly paralyzed and eyesight failing; 
the lady or husband will have to 
give insulin shots, do house work 
and cooking. I'm a partly paralyzed 
veteran of WW II. My dad has 
heart trouble and can do little work. 
Man expected to drive and do yard 
work, plus small errands. Good sal- 
ary per month. Qm interview Sat- 
urday, February 20, and Sunday, 
February 21, 1:00 to 4:00 p. m. 
Ernest L. Hight, 18 Roe St., Wal- 
ton, Ky. lt-7c 



AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE- 
Now written to everyone, if driv- 
ing record is good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur 
lington, Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

LIVESTOCK HAULING — Robert 
Richardson, 356-6749 or 291-8370. 

16t-44* 




ELOISE BEAUTY SALON— 125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 



WANTED TO BUY— Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 

WANTED— 'Baby sitting at your home 
in or around Walton, cither night 
or after 2:00 p. m. weekdays. * Ex- 
perienced and mature. Please call 
485-4859. > lt-7* 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf-29c 

COLES BEAUTY SHOP — Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 

JACK'S BARBER SHOP - Walton". 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat-- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. tf-lc 



For Rent— 



NOTICE- 



FOR RENT— Ijroom house, and a 
2-room house. Elzie Webster, Ellis- 
ton, Ky., Route 1, 41038. Phone 

. 824-6617. 4t-4* 

FOR RENT— Three-room house trail- 
er. Call 485-4298. lt-7* 

FOR RENT— Three rooms and bath 
furnished apartment, adults only. 
109 North Main St., Walton, Ky. 
485-4392. lt-7* 



PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
work, remodeling, and repairs 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. tf-34c 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO.— 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac- 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler. 485-4217. tfl-Or 

COMMERCIAL BACK HOE— Cis- 
terns, septic tanks, drain fields, and 
general work. Lunsford Trucking. 
356-7527. tf-5c 



FREE TO A GOOD HOME— Part 
Collie female; large Terrier, adults 
only, needs fenced yard; part Ger- 
man Shepherd female; also medium 
size Terriers. Call 331-2374, 9:00 
a. m-. to 4:00 p. m. 2t-6* 

NOTICE — Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 

Nothing helps a woman to stay 
young so much as having friends who 
don't know how old she is. 



Services— 



... FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



— : WANTED :— 

Cash for Any Kind of Real Estate, 
Regardless of Price or Condition. 

Rel S. (Buck) Wayman 

356-5068 




BUILD UP ROOFING — Shingles, 
gutter work, patch work of all kinds. 
New roof warranty. Free estimates. 
Phone 356-9853 or 356-7100. 

20t-39* 

JIM'S BARBER SHOP- 335 West 
Southern, Latonia. Two chair shop. 
First chair, Jim Coldiron; 2nd chair, 
Vic Rosenstiel. Latest hair cuts and 
styles. 4t-5* 

ELECTRIC SEWER CLEANING— 
Cisterns and septic tanks cleaned. 
Pre-fab concrete cisterns. J. F. 
Lucas Sanitation Company. Phone 
356-2315. tf-5c 

WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists; radios and stereos. Used TV's, 
perfect condition, guaranteed 30 
days. 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 
Phone 485-7616. tf-3c 

Next to missing a day's work and 
having the boss find out, the worst 
thing is to miss a day and have no- 
body notice. 



DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 

LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON— Grade 
"A" Salorrr Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
493-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cox 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m., 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. tf-38c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS — For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. cFIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC 
IATION, 30 Needmore St., Walton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl, 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 



The I In You 

Time was when any young girl 
with beauty designs on herself 
was advised to emulate the mod- 
els from the pages of the glossy 
magazines. As a result, there was 
an abundance of straight-haired, 
wide-eyed cardboard -stiff in- 
genue types running around. 
i > Words like "neat" and "keen" 
issued forth from their mouths 
in balloons. 

Today (thank heavens . . . 
sigh), it's fashionable to be in- 
dividual. If you have dark hair 
and an olive complexion, you 
don't have to spend your days 
wishing you were fair haired and 
rosy-cheeked. What the new in- 
dividuality means is that not 
only can you be yourself (who- 
ever that is), you can also be 
fifty other different people. 

If you feel like playing Greta 
Garbo— in your own particular 
way— don a maxi trench coat, a 
knitted cloche or tailored poplin 
hat, let your hair hang down and 
slightly curved and accent your 
eyes with smoky Gray Realgirl 
eyeshadow. Want to try on a 
French impressionist image? 
Sweep your hair up in the wash- 
erwoman style, slather on some 
Plum Tussy Eyeshadow, and don 
a softly clinging crepe dress. As 
you can see, cosmetics and fash* 
ion are all for you — whatever 
image you choose. 

Is this type of image picking 
different from the old Copycat 
emulation? You bet it is! Be- 
cause you never lose sight of the 
real you— 

SEPTIC TANKS— Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS— Precast; sales 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 

FASmONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, personal 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fashionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 



YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER — In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines as 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoover 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or* American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Girard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 years in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00. tf-29c 



INCOME TAX 

ROGER SAYLOR 

Crittenden, Ky. 
824-4212 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 




—income tax- 
no Waiting. Call for Free Esti- 
mate and Appointment. Reason- 
able rates. 14 Years Experience. 

356-9690 

After 5:00 Week Days 


<■ 




CONGRATULATES NEW TROOPERS-Gov. Louie B. Nunn congratulates newly 
graduated state troopers in his office. Governor Nunn told the new troopers to "do 
a job you can be proud of." The 45-member class equals in number the largest class 
ever graduated from the State Police Academy. (Gary Robinson Photo) 



Thursday, February 18, 1971 



Wilton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 



Covington 



Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
F. H. A. and Mortgages! 



NEW BANKLICK 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

THE COMING YEAR is to be en 
exciting one for members of the New 
Banklick Baptist Church. Great new 
items of interest are being added to 
the church plans for Spring and Sum- 
mer of 1971. Just watch this church 
report in the Walton Advertiser from 
time to time for each added item of 
interest for Christians -and the non- 
Christians alike. 



Lunsford Tracking-Blackfopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO LARGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 

MORNING VIEW, KY. 356-7527 - 359-4667 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
March 3rd, 17th and 31st. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County — George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County — Donald Conrad 824-6551 

Campbell County— Bruce Trapp 635-5129 

Kenton County— George Bach 356-6278 



TRI-COUNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL fir COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING & REPAIR 

Trenching & Installation of Gas & Water Service 

824 6665 or 356-7477 



HELP WANTED 

Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to — 

BORON STOP 338 

1-75 & 338 RICHWOOD, KY. 



CHEMICAL CLINIC... .... 

Come, hear the latest information on insect control 
and weed control in corn, alfalfa, minor elements, and 
weed control around the farm. 

Meeting Starts at 7:30 P. M., February J8th at 



Hungry Jack's Smorgasbord 

Dixie Highway & Industrial Road Florence, Ky. 

Sponsored By 

Boone County Farm Supply 

and 

Geigy Agricultural Chemical Co. 




Don't let Tight Money keep you from completing 
plans for your new home. We can help you suc- 
cessfully complete the mortgage details with the 
advice of our specialists. They can also advise 
you of low interest rates with payments tailored 
to your budget and the advantage of low closing 
costs. It's just one more benefit of doing business 
with 

ROSEDALE FEDERAL 

SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

"IN THE HEART OF LATONIA" 

CAROLINE AND SOUTHERN AVENUE 

COVINGTON, KY. PHONE 431-7723 




BY LAWRENCE W. ALTHOUSE 



PROFESSION AND 
PRACTICE 

Lesson for February 21, 1971 




Background Scripture: Matthew 7:21 -29j 
21:23-32. 

The famous British strongman, 
Mr. Sandow of London, was once 
interviewed in his palatial gym- 
nasium. He told a reporter: "Peo- 
ple come to me with a blank 
check in their hands and say, 'I 
will pay you any fee you like, if 
jyou will produce 
for me a strong, 
|healthy, young 
body,' and I say 
'Excellent!' —but 
ithen it turns out 
that I am to go 
j into the gymna- 
j sium and swing 
! dumbbells and do 
'exercises on the 
Rev. Althouse floor, while they 
go away and eat and drink and 
smoke too much and keep late 
hours. Regretfully I tell them, 'It 
can't be done.' " 

Knowing and doing 

Isn't this what many physicians 
discover?- People will come to 
them, willing to pay any amount 
of money to be rid of this or that 
ailment. Yet, when the doctor 
prescribes a special diet or a list 
of things they must avoid, they 
pay their money and go away do- 
ing as they please. Some even 
come back later and demand to 
know why they are not' getting 
any better! 

People often came to Jesus 
seeking his advice and help, yet, 
some of them, upon receiving 
what they asked for, decided they 
really didn't want it anyway. 
That's the way it was with the 
rich young man whose "posses- 
sions were great." He wanted to 
know what to do, but when he 
knew, he did not do it. 

This is often true of people in 
their relationship with God. We 
come to him with our problems 
and he tells us what to do, but, 
when we find out the truth, we 
decide we really don't want to do 
it. We may pray every day .asking 
him to change our lives arid then 
get up from our knees and go 
about the day's work resisting all 
opportunities to change. Then, 
when_jiothi ng happens, we„ 
Toe incredulous "What! You mean 
after all this praying and going 
to church, you're not going to do 
what I ask?" 

The real "believers" 

There is a tremendous gap be- 
tween profession and practice. It 
is so much easier to profess our 
"beliefs" for it seldom costs us 
much to say words, to make the 
right gestures. Most of us suffer 
nothing by professing the Chris- 
tian faith. In fact, there are many 
communities where not being a 
church member is a distinct dis- 
advantage. 

Practicing Christianity, on the 
other hand, is a different matter. 
Contrary to professing Christian 
beliefs, practicing them may cost 
us something. (In fact, one of my 
maxims is that if my practice 
of Christianity is costing me 
nothing or little, there must be 
something wrong with my Chris- 
tianity! ) This is why the Apostle 
James challenges us to be, not 
just "hearers of the word," but 
"doers." 

Which of the two? 

Jesus's words in Matthew 21:28- 
32 must have angered many of 
his listeners for he is suggesting - 
that they are not "real believers." 
They are like the son who says 
"yes" to his father but doesn't 
do what he is supposed to do. 
They profess their obedience, but 
do not practice it They know the 
truth, but they do not do it 

On the other hand, he is say- 
ing, the tax collectors, prostitutes, 
and other disreputable people 
who are responding to him are 
like the son who says "no," but 
then does what he is asked to do. 
Though they do not seem to be 
religious, they are the ones who 
really please God. 

Who are the professing sons 
today? And who are the sons who 
really practice what God asks of 
them? 

(Based on outline* copyrighted by the 
Division of Christian Education, National 
Council of the Churches of Christ in tho 
U.S.A. Released by Community frost 

Service.) 



THE YOUTH are our main em- 
phasis in the coming year. We find 
that very little is being offered to our 
young people today on their level. 
Too much is in the offering that was 
fine a decade ago, but people have 
changed, and this change must be 
met to hold the attention of this 
Rocket Age set of youngsters today. 
Programs must be planned around 
those things that interest them the 
most, but on a Christian basis. We 
of the New Banklick Baptist Church 
have found that our young people are 
being bypassed because we adults do 
no consider them ready for responsi- 
bility; however, the leaders and pastor 
of this church have observed that if 
you give your young people some re- 
sponsible task to do, they • will carry 
it through, even with greater fervor 
than we adults. May we give you an 
example: * > * 

THE RECREATION COMMIT- 
TEE recently added to their commit- 
tee Mike Schadler, one of Our fine 
teen-agers of our church, who has just 
as much authority in the planning of 
youth activities as the adults. Brother 
Ray Mercer, Director of Recreation, 
reports that Mike is doing an excel- 
lent job. Recently the youth had a 
sledding party at the Frank Kidwells 
on Maher Road. There were over 52 
persons of all ages to turn out to en- 
joy the fun and fellowship. There was 
a wonderful time of fun and snacking 
at the Frank Kidwells later. Everyone 
enjoyed a great time of fun. 

THE RECREATION COMMIT- 
TEE is always open for suggestions 
for good Christian types of activities 
for the youth of our church and, with 
hopes for the many of our commun- 
ity who do not have a church home 
to attend. 

THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT is 
having a special music program with 
the Junior Choir. Due to inclement 
weather the program had to be can- 



celled on Sunday night, February 7; 
however, if all goes well, it will be 
held on Sunday morning, Feb. 14. 
These Junior members have worked 
long and hard to be able to sing for 
their parents and friends, and desire 
a nice hand of assurance and support. 

THE INCLEMENT WEATHER 
has had a very broad effect on our 
overall church attendance. This was 
seen on Sundays, January 31 and Feb- 
ruary 7, due to the heavy snowfall. 
The real bad snow storm that we had 
on February 8 put the brakes on 
many of the planned church activities 
for that week. But this should make 
us all appreciate more the beautiful 
sunshine which usually follows these 
winter storms. But when it is at all 
possible, and our roads are open, let 
us put all our energy to come to 
God's House on Sunday and worship 
Him in Spirit and in Truth. God will 
bless us, every one. 

ADDITIONS TO OUR CHURCH 



are: Mrs. Alphalie Annette (Jackie) 
Grayson, Shelly Switzer. Both came 
on baptism. For re-dedication: Mrs. 
Louise Mercer, Anna Stansel, Coella 
Callen. We give thanks to our Lord 
who adds to His church daily, those 
that are saved. 

CARD OF THANKS- 

The family of William Howard 
McCubbin wishes to thank relatives, 
friends and neighbors who sent cards, 
flowers, and food at their time of sor- 
row. To Dr. Perry and Dr. Ravens- 
craft and the nurses at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital for their wonderful care; to 
Bro. Robert Ginn for his consoling 
words, and to Judy Black and the 
boy's quartet for their beautiful music 
in song, and to Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home for the wonderful ser- 
vice rendered. Your kindness will long 
be remembered. 

EDNA McCUBBIN 
lt-7* AND FAMILY 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne— 635-2695 




Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pood 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 



COMPLETE INCOME TAX SERVICE 
Harold R. Weaver & Associate 

Former, Business, Professional, and Personal. 
Phone for Appointment or Stop In. 

Box 3, Big Bone Road Phone 
Union, Kentucky 41091 384-3330 

Don't Be Late — 27 Years Experience! 



Putting 

Things 

In 

Order 



In this age of medicare, social security and homes 
for the aged, sometimes people forget an important 
part of growing old — tranquility! 

Yes? tranquility and peace are just as important 
in growing old gracefully as is sufficient insurance 
or all the other means with winch we show our con- 
cern for the elderly. 

Have you ever noticed that old people have a 
knack of putting things in order? In fact, they need 
everything tidy, neat and sure. Certainly their great- 
est need is for peace and security — but this can 
come only when they are at peace with Godl 

If we want to reap the harvest of friendship 
with God in our old age, then we must cultivate 
our relation with Him — when we are young and able. 
Regular church attendance and worship is your as- 
surance of peace and tranquility during your own 
gentle lengthening years. It will be a heaven-sent 
reward and one which you cannot, will not, want 
to miss. 




Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 

Mark Mark Luke Matthew Matthew Matthew Matthew 

10:17-27 13:9-13 10:25-28 13:1-8 16:24-28 18:1-6 18:11-14 



Scriptures selected by the American Bible Society 



Copyright 1971 Keister Advertising Service, Inc., Strasburg, Virginia 



The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 



ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 

Phone 485-4600 North Main St, Walton 

BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PBOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

Phone 485-4808 



HALL ELEC. & APPL. SERVICE 

Phone 485-4087 Walton, Kentucky 

MOTCH— JEWELERS 

013 Madleea At«bm Covington, Kftthj 



READNOUR COAL fir FEED 

Phone 485-4504 Walton, 



BENTON-BONAR DEFT. STORE 

185-4405 Walton, Kentncky 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phone 350-2172 WaHon, Kentncky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or $71-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Kentncky 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 358-3081 Nicholson, Kentncky 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

Phone 485-4121 Walton, Kentncky 



JOS. J. HOBAN INSURANCE AGENCY 

ROBERTS INSURANCE AGENCY 
Phone 485-4149 Walton, Kentucky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CQ. 

"Ah" Ryan 485-4181 Walton, Ky. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 485-0111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 4854063 "Your Local Newspaper'* 

WALTON HDW. & DRY GOODS 

Phone 485-4000 Cliff Ryan, Prop. 

WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 

Phone 485-4163 Walton, Kentncky 



Walton Advertiser, Wolton, Kentucky 



r 



( 



Thursday, February 18, 1971 



IS YOUR SUBSCRIPTION PAID IN ADVANCf? 



ORDINANCE NO. 1971-1 / 

An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to 
*** ^SfS?„2^S™? corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS the City Council of the ,City of Walton, Kentucky deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best interest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present westerly corporate limits of the City, 
and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the corporate terri- 
tory of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

w ^ffSS,' X^S^ESF' THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

SECTION 1. That all territory located within the boundary hereinafter 
set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a fifth 
class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to be annexed is described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a point in the existing City Limits, said point being the 
point of intersection of the existing City Limits with Beaver Grade Road ap- 
proximate 670 feet northwest of the west right of way of 1-75; thence North- 
easterly with the existing City Limits 640 feet, more or less, to the right of 
way of 1-75; thence Northeasterly with the right of way of 1-75, 900 feet, more 
or less, to the right of way of 1-71 Southbound ramp to 1-75; thence with the 
nght of way curve to the left 1200 feet, more or less, to the southeast right of 
way of 1-71; thence Southwesterly with the 1-71 right of way 1680 feet, more 
or less, to a point 300 feet from Beaver Grade Road, thence 300 feet from an 
parallel to Beaver Road southeasterly 2650 feet, more or less, to the existing 
City Limits; thence Northwesterly with the existing City Limits 910 feet, more 
or less, to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in Sec- 
tion 81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and henceforth be considered 
as with the corporation limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. * 

SECTION 4. All ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to be invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
the remaining sections of said ordinance would have been passed despite such 
invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regular 
meeting of Council by a vote of 4 members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 and February 4, 11, 18, 1971 



20 Years Ago . 



Foy - Johnston 

DIRECT FACTORY PAINT DEALER 

Wallpaper In Stock 
Wall-lex Art Supplies 
Picture Frames . . . 

LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 



264 Main Street 
Park In Rear 



Florence, Kentucky 
Phone 371-7921 



Thursday, February 15, 1951 

WALTON— 

The Walton Woman's Literary 
Club will sponsor the 1951 Heart 
Fund campaign in this community, 
which is to get under way during the 
month of February, according to Mrs. 
W. D. Scroggin, club president. 

Tom Parker, John Wood and Jesse 
Callen are spending two weeks in 
Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wilson were the 
weekend guests of relatives in Cov- 
ington. 

The Gladys Hopewell Circle met 
at the home of Mrs. Juanita Struve 
on Thursday evening, Feb. 8. Only 
four members were present due to the 
severe weather. 

Miss Aleta Pauline Mastin, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Mastin, 
Walton, has registered as a freshman 
for the spring semester a^ Upland, 
Ind. 

J. O. Ward, 34th District, Basket- 
ball Tournament Manager, calls your 
attention to the fact the tournament 
this year will be held in the Walton- 
Verona gym. Since the gymnasium 
capacity is only 900, there will be al- 
lowed only 900 in the gym on these 
nights. 

The City Council of Walton, in a 
recent meeting, ruled that everyone 
delivering goods or services to the 
City of Walton must have a purchase 
order beforehand, signed by a mem- 
ber of the council. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Siekman and 
family of Hebron, were the Sunday 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Penn 
and family. 
INDEPENDENCE— 

The congregation of the Christian 
Church welcomed their pastor back to 
the pulpit last Sunday after two or 
more weeks of sickness. 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation & Repair 

Precast Cisterns and 

Backhoe Work. 

■w 

356-5804 







SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20th 



10:00 A. M. 



At the farm of Mr. & Mrs. Richard Turner, Cason Lane off Sherman-Mr. Zion Road (Fred Ecklar Farm Owner). 
If coming South, take 1-75 to Crittenden Exit, then U. sC 25 to Sherman; if coming North, take 1-75 to Dry 
Ridge Exit, then U. S. 25 to Sherman. 

- 

Sherman, Ky., Grant County 

« 

Mr. & Mrs. Turner are leaving this farm and will sell on the above date— 

TRACTORS, EQUIPMENT, CATTLE— 1969 FarmaD 756 diesel tractor with big tires, 3-point hitch, 2 right 
and left hydraulic valves, also with power steering, power brakes, deluxe seat, rear weights, independent take-off, 
also 1,000 rpm, 100" axle— bought new Oct 2, 1969; 1970 444 Farmall tractor (gas), live power, power steering, 
differential lock, auxiliary valve for remote cylinder with bumper, pins Freeman front loader, stay bar adjustable, 
to be sold as a unit together— bought new April, 1970; 1952 Farmall Super H recently overhauled, with new head, 
also has extra low gear; all tractor equipment listed below will be sold separately and will not be grouped with 
tractors — 3-point bitch I. H. (No. 411), 4-bottom 14-inch plows (like new), spring trip beam, Holland tobacco 
setter (fits I. H. A, 100 or 140), Woods B-114 rotary mower (9*i-ft cut pull type), 3-point bitch I. H. 2*ow 
com planter, I. H. rubber tired wagon with new 8xl6-ft flat bed, IVi-ton trailer with 750x20 tires, 3-point 
hitch 2-barrel boom 21-ft spray. Also to be sold for a neighbor, Mr. Lovelance— 1954 G Allis Chalmers tractor 
with motor in rear, cultivators, plows, sickle bar and rotary mower underneath, all work on hydraulic lift. 

Forage Harvester Equipment includes New Holland Super 717 with 9 knives, 1969 model, used Wa corn seasons, 
Fox blower (power take-off) with long hopper, used 2 years with pipe for 35' silo, extra pipe, distributor buckets, 
new elbow, ropes and pulleys, 2 New Holland wagons with rubber tires and self unload, also electric unload, 700 
pounds front end weight and bracket that fits 544, 656, 756 or 856, new 50-ft endless 6-in. rubber belt, Champ- 
ion tobacco spray, 275-gallon water tank, 20-ft. bay elevator and motor, 7-ft. I. H. pull type disk, power take-off 
water pump, cow clippers, al um i n u m electric heater, Warm Morning stove, log chain, many tractor and plow 
parts, electric grinder; DeLaval milker, sterling type, floor model with extra bucket. 

30 head of Holstein cows, heifers and one bull; seven of these cows range in age from 4 to 9 years, balance are 
3 years and under, heifers range in age, 9 months to 2 years, some heifers are bred, some open— there are 16 
cows milking now and milk was weighed Jan. 13—2 cows gave 67 to 73 lbs., 1 cow gave 58 lbs., 8 cows gave 
from 40 to 46 lbs., and 5 cows gave 34 to 39 lbs.; yearhng Holstein bull— TB and Bangs tested. 

TERMS: CASH 

Sale Conducted By 

COL. CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

REALTORS-AUCTIONEERS-APPRAISERS 

Main Street, Wflhamstown, Kentucky 

823-1611, if no answer, dial "O" and ask for 

(no charge) Enterprise 4222 



/ 



4 East Southern Avenue, Covington, Ky. 

Phone 431-4222 Anytime 
"If Yon Have Anything to Sell— Call Us" 



AUCTIONEERS 



COL CECIL WAYMAN b EEL C WAYMAN 



A farewell party was held last Sat- 
urday night in the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lee Houston, Wilson Road, for 
four young men of the community 
who have joined the Navy: Robert 
Richerson of Morning View, Jack 
Houston of Independence, Charles 
O'Bryan of Madison Pike, and Wayne 
Hicks of Taylor Mill Road. 

Oliver Dillion of Richardson Road, 
joined the Navy and left Feb. 5th. 

The Bellevue Tigers playing one of 
their best games of the season, hand- 
ed the Simon Kenton Pioneers a 44- 
40 setback last week. Qualy with 13 
and Schneider with 12 led the Belle- 
vue attack, while Coppage led the 
Pioneers with 14 points. 
VERONA— 

Mrs. Clyde Chapman and son, who 
went to Idaho, returned here recently 
accompanied by her mother. 

BLUE RIBBON 4-H CLUB 

The February meeting of the Blue 
Ribbon 4-H Club was called to order 
by President Brcnda Gibson. The 
meeting was held in the home of 
Kathy Elbert. 

Laura West and Diane Scherdcr led 
the pledges. Kathy Elbert called roll 
and read the minutes, which was ap- 
proved. The treasurer's report was 
read by Brenda Duncan. 

Old business was the hem lesson 
attended by even girls and one leader. 
Officers' Training was attended by 
four girls and a leader. 

Laura West won area champion on 
lrer knitting record book. She also 
won second runner-up at the 4-H skat- 
ing party Princess Contest. Six of 
our members attended the~, skating 
party. 

New business included discussing 
community activities for the coming 
months. 

Members brought material and pat- 
terns for us to see and we had a 
demonstration on "Tailor Tacks," by 
Brenda Gibson. We had another 
demonstration on hems and fabric 
grain by Mrs Gibson. 

Songs were sung and program chair- 
man, Patty Gash, gave the floor to 
the Variety Show Committee for 
practice. 

Members attending were: Brenda 
Gibson, Brenda Duncan, Patty Gash, 
Kathy Elbert, Tracy Gabbard, Robbie 
Gibson, Lisa West, Diane Scherder, 
and Laura West. — Lisa West 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We would like to thank our rela- 
tves, friends and neighbors for their 
many kindnesses shown in the past 
and recently at the death of our be- 
loved mother, Mrs. Lillian Mullins. 

We would like to thank Bro. Smith 
for his words of comfort to the family 
at the time of her passing at Booth 
Hospital. 

We especially would like to thank 
Bro. William F. Barnard for his con- 
soling words; to Bro. Creasy for assist- 
ing and for the beautiful songs render- 
ed by Bro. and Mrs. Barnard; also 
Mrs. Pat Burkhart for presiding at the 
piano, and to Bro. McElmurry and 
Bro. Thatcher for their words of kind- 
ne ss. ! 



Billy Mac Waller, who spent the 
weekend with his parents, recently "re- 
turned to Berea College for the last 
semester. 

BEAVER LICK- 

Misses Jill Feagan and Patsy Mastin 
were shopping in Cincinnati, Saturday. 

Master Ronrw'e Hopperton spent the 
weekend with Jimmie Noe of Union. 



Mr. and Mrs. jimmy McCabbin 
and son were dinner guests recently 
of Mr. and Mrs. "Clifford Rouse. 

Mrs. Rosa Isaacs spent Monday 
with her daughter, Mrs. E. Black, 
and Mr. Black. 

It's better to give than to receive. 
Also, it's deductible. 



ORDINANCE NO. 1971-2 
An Ordinance proposing the annexation of certain territory contiguous to 
the existing North and West corporate limits of the City of Walton, Ken- 
tucky. 

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, deems 
it to be to the best interest of its citizens and the best intersest of persons 
owning and/or residing in certain hereinafter described unincorporated territory; 
said territory lying adjacent to the present northwest corporate limits of the 
City, and that said territory be annexed to and become a part of the eerporate 
territory of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY ORDAINS AS FOLLOWS: 

SECTION 1. That all the territory located within the boundary herein- 
after set out is proposed to be annexed to the City of Walton, Kentucky, a 
fifth class city. 

SECTION 2. The property proposed to be annexed is^escribed as follows: 

BEGINNING AT the northeast corner of the existing City limits: thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of the C. N. O. & T. P. Railroad 
1060 feet, more or less, or sufficient to reach the north right of way of Ken- 
tucky No. 16; thence Easterly with said Kentucky No. 16, 100 feet, more or 
less, or sufficient to reach the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike; thence 
Northeasterly with the west right of way of Old Lexington Pike 1220 feet, 
more or less, to the south right of way of Chambers Road; thence Northwesterly 
with the south right of way of Chambers Road 2300 feet, more or less; thence 
Southeasterly 300 feet, more or less; thence 300 feet from an parallel to 
Chambers Road southeasterly 1650 feet, more or less, to a point 300 feet from 
U. S. Highway No. 25; thence 300 feet from and parallel to U. S. No. 25 
southwesterly 2160 feet, more or less, to a point in the Parker tract; thence 
with the Parker tract and projection of said tract line southeasterly 450 feet. 
to the existing City Limits; thence Northeasterly with the existing City Limits 
450 feet more or less; thence Southeasterly with the existing City Limits 340 
feet, more or less, to the beginning. 

SECTION 3. That thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordin- 
ance as by law required, unless there be a civil action filed as provided in 
Section 81.00 and 81.230 of the Kentucky Revised Statues, in the Boone Circuit 
Court, Burlington, Kentucky, then there will be an Ordinance proposed and 
upon its passage, the territory set out in details in Section No. 2 hereof shall 
become a part of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and will henceforth be con- 
sidered as within the corporate limits of the City of Walton, Kentucky. 

SECTION 4. All ordinances, resolutions, or parts thereof, in conflict 
herewith, are to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed. 

SECTION 5. If any section, paragraph or clause of this ordinance be 
held by a proper court to \e invalid, such invalidity shall not effect the re- 
maining sections, paragraphs, or clauses, it being hereby expressly declared that 
the remainder of said ordinance would have been passed despite such invalidity. 

Passed by the City Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, at a regu- 
meeting of Council by a vote of 4 members of the Council on the 19th day 
of January, 1971. 

K. Dale Stephens, Mayor of the City of Walton, Kentucky 
Attest: Daisy Hill, Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky 

Published January 28 and February 4, 11, 18, 1971 



We would like to thank those who 
sent so many beautiful flowers, food, 
and donations of money to be given in 
her memory to her church, Wilming- 
ton, Pendleton County Hospital, and 
for the Bibles that were bought and 
distributed in her memory. 

We would like to thank her doc- 
tors, Dr. William Waller and Dr. 
Carl Kumpe, for their services; also 
the Peoples Funeral Home of Butler, 
for their efficient services; to the pall- 
bearers, and anyone else who assisted 
in any way. All these kind deeds 
shall always be remembered by her 
children and we pray God's richest 
blessings on each and everyone. 

MARVIN, LOUISE, 
lt-7c GENE & FAMILIES 



ABSOLUTE 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1971 
Al 10:00 A. M. 

At the farm of Mrs. Jessie Wainscott, Williamstown, Ky., 2 Miles 
South of Wflhamstown, on U. S. 25, near State Barns— follow arrows 
to the farm. 

Mrs. Wainscott has sold her farm and is selling her livestock and 
equipment at absolute auction. 

One 4-year-old registered Hereford Poll bull, extra nice and gentle; 
22 purebred Hereford cows, 1 1 with calves; JHergford-An gus cow: Holstein 



-cowr-12- HHeforcT feeders. An~caWe~tested. 

John Deere "A" tractor; John Deere "M" tractor with cultivators; 
John Deere 14-T baler; John Deere rake; tandem disc; sled; fertilizer 
spreader; 3-point hitch spreader blade; set of 2-row rear mounted cul- 
tivators; tractor mounted alfalfa boom spray; soil surger; tractor mounted 
seed sower; cattle feeders; 7,500 tobacco sticks; some bay; miscellaneous 
small tools; John Deere manure spreader; IHC manure spreader, and 
posthole digger. 

. SALE CONDUCTED BY 

LILLARD - STEGER, REALTORS 

823-101 T 356-5116 

AUCTIONEERS 

Darwin Bailey & William C. Lillard 

Not Responsible for Accidents! Lunch Served! 




THE BIGGEST THING 
IN YOUR LIFE 

It's that little guy of yours. He depends 
on you. His future depends on you, too. 
Start now and insure a successful future 
with a Savings Account at General. 



the first in Kentucky 



GENERAL 
SAVINGS 

the general savings and loan association, inc. 

6th ft Madison, Covington, Ky. • 291-7219 4501 Dine Highway, Elsmere, Ky. • 341-4848 




tm 



Thursday, February 18, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Mutt and Jeff 

' FEW PEOPLE REALIZE H/t^ NEWSPAPER KEEPS V MILLIONS OP DOLLARS ^ NOW, DO YOU 
.i^.i<M«.i U >nM^ — ..—. TUC vA/nDI n IMFOBMFD' Aor enckir ml Mcuic. i/KJntA/ lA/UAT 



HOW GREAT AND IMPORTANT 
A NEWSPAPER REALLy IS 
AND WHAT IT DOES.' 



the world informed, 
the newspaper records 
world history andtells 
about our presidents/ 



ARE SPENT OM NEWS- 
PAPER. ADVERTISING 
WHICH IN TCJRN SELLS 
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 
WORTH OF GOODS AND 
KEEPS MILLIONS OF 
PEOPLE WORKING/ 





KNOW WHAT THE 
NEWSPAPER 
DOES? 



z 



rr makes 

ME HAPPY 
READING 

THE 
FUNNIES/ 



-DEATHS- 

MRS. ROSA LAWSON 

Mrs. Rosa Lawson, 79, of 5600 
Wilson Road, Independence,, died at 
10:15 p. m., Monday, Feb. 8, at the 
Grant County Hospital, where she 
had been a patient for three days. 

A former resident of Butler, she 
was a member of the Mt. Moriah 
Christian Church. 

Survivors include three daughters, 
Mrs. Margaret Straub of Indepen- 
dence, Mrs. Anna Mae Gunsaulye of 
Loveland, Ohio, and Mrs. Geneva 
Shoemaker of Cold Spring; six sons, 



Russell Haley and Julius Yelton, both 
of Independence, John Lawson, Ji>.of 
Walton, Carl Lawson of Cape Ken- 
nedy, Fla., R. G. Lawson of Fal- 
mouth, and Roy Lawson of Alexan- 
dria; two sisters, Mrs. Anna Wenzel 
of Falmouth, and Mrs. Barbara Loomis 
of Covington, and three brothers, 
Louis and Leslie Hess of Falmouth, 
and William Hess of Demossville. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m., 
last Friday at Woodhcad & Son, Fal- 
mouth. 



CLIFFORD LIPSCOMB 

Clifford Lipscomb, 74, of 510 Wil- 



Estate Auction 

SATURDAY, FEB. 27lh - 10:30 A.M. 

LOCATION: Owenton, Ky., at the residence of the late Mrs. J. W. 
Juett, 301 Roland Avenue. In order to settle the estate of the late Mrs. 
J. W. Juett, we will sell the following real estate and personal property: 

REAL ESTATE: Apartment house, 2-story frame, consisting of 3 units 
(first floor has 4-room apartment with bath, 3-room apartment with bath, 
second floor has 3-room apartment with bath and is furnished.) This 
house has city water and city sewerage, and is in real good state of re- 
pair. The tenants have lived here for a long time. This house is situat- 
ed on a large lot, 71x293 feet, and is now paying a Very substantial 
income. This house is well located on a good street (Roland Avenue), 
approximately one-half block east of the Juett residence, is within easy 
walking or driving distance of main part of town, located in a good 
neighborhood. This property may be seen before day of sale by ap- 
pointment. Contact R. W. Juett, phone Owenton 502-484-2279, or Mrs. 
Kepple Roland, phone 484-2305. If this property is purchased as rental 
property, possession will be given March 1, 1971. If you are looking 
for a good investment and a good return on your money, don't fail to 
attend this sale. This property will sell at 10:30 a. in., so be on time. 

PERSONAL: Immediately following the sale of this prooperty, we will 
sell the following personal property at the Juett residence: 2 lounge 
chairs, floor lamp, Philco television, 2 ottomen, 3 smoking stands, leather 
top table, telephone bench, card table and 4 chairs, end tables, folding 
table, several -straight chairs, electric fans, window fan, 6 wool rugs 12x15, 
pole lamp, lot electric table lamps, wrought iron table, electric ironer, 
Electrolux sweeper, 3 cane back rockers, kneehole desk, desk chair, type- 
writer, adding machine, writing desk, gas fireplace logs, sun lamp, Singer 
electric sewing machine (table model), electric chord organ, odd dining 
chairs, filing cabinet, pedal type" sewing machine (Old Ky. Home), bam- 
boo shades, kidney shaped dressing table, double mirror wardrobe, roll- 
away bed, baby bed and mattress, maple corner cupboard, metal utility 
table, wall cabinet, metal utility cabinets (double and single), wood 
utility cabinet, 2 gas cooking stoves, kitchen cabinet, Maytag automatic 
washer, 19 cu. ft. Norge chest type deep freeze, cooking utensils, 2 
kitchen stools, lot wall plates (hand painted, fine china), lot milk glass, 
books and bookcase, nice straw rug, pressure cooker, lot dishes (several 
antique glass china, etc.), 2 buffets. 

ANTIQUES: Needle point rocker, old fashion parlor pump organ and 
stool in perfect condition, piano bench, wash bowl and pitcher in good 
condition, 2 stone churns and dashers (1 large, 1 small), Gone-With-the- 
Wind lamp, solid walnut wardrobe, calendar clock in good running con- 
dition, 2 mantle clocks, 2-piece love seat, blue and white granite ware, 
Victrola and records in good condition, ice CTeam stool, 5-gallon cream 
can, dog irons, fireplace screen set, iron tea kettle, hall tree with minor 
and brass hangers, picture frames, high chair, roll-top trunks, cane bot- 
tom chairs, stone jugs, stone jars, lot milk crocks, Daisy churn, flat irons, 
hand scales, lot oil lamps (small stems, wall oil lamps), rocker, 10-gallon 
milk cans, round iron kettle, lot old bottles (1 fiddle bottle), dishes and 
vases, dutch oven, fruit jars, etc., lawn furniture, aluminum glider, coal 
buckets, electric roaster and deep fryer, stepladder, garden hose, picnic 
table, metal lawn chairs, yard and garden tools, plus many other items 
too numerous to mention. 

Lunch Served On Grounds! (Not Responsible For Accidents) 

TERMS: Real estate, 20% of the purchase price to be paid down on 
day of sale, balance of the purchase price to be paid upon delivery of 
deed; personal property, cash. 

MRS. J. W. JUETT ESTATE, OWENTON, KY. 

CO-EXECUTORS: 

R. W. Juett, Owenton, Ky., Route 1-484-2279 

Mrs. Kepple Roland, Owenton, Ky. — 484-2305 

John Juett, Cynrhiana, Ky. 

Paul Noel Cr W. D. Sullivan, Auctioneers 

Carrollton, Ky.— 732-6721 Warsaw, Ky.— 567-6331 



son Road, Independence, died Thurs- 
day, Feb. 11, at St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital, Covington. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Angie Cram Lipscomb; two daughters, 
Mrs. Mabel Wermuth and Mrs. Helen 
West, both of Independence; two 
brothers, Frank Lipscomb of Morning 
View, and Atwood Lipscomb of Inde- 
pendence, and a sister, Mrs. Jessie 
Rice of Elsmere. 

Services were held at 2:00 p. m.," 
Monday at the Grace Baptist Church, 
Independence, where he was a dea- 
con. Burial was in the Independence 
Cemetery. Swindler Funeral Home of 
Independence, had charge. 

FRED WEBSTER 

Services were held at 11:00 a. m., 
last Saturday in the Hamilton Funeral 
Home, Verona, for Fred Webster, 83, 
of 199 Moffctt Road, Morning View. 
Burial was in New Bethel Cemetery, 
Verona. 

Mr. Webster died Tuesday, Feb. 9 
at his home. 

He is survived by three daughters, 
Mrs. May Kramer of Erlanger, Mrs. 
Sarah King of Morning View, and 
Mrs. Hazel Adams of Cincinnati, and 
a son, Roy Webster, Elliston. 

LON WILSON 

Lon Wilson, 85, of Beaver Lick 
(Walton, Route 2), died at 6:00 p. 
, ( m, last Friday at Woodspoint Nurs- 
ing Home, Florence. He was a retired 
farmer, and a member of the Beaver 
Lick Christian Church. 

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. 
Kate Baker Wilson, and several nieces 
and nephews. 

Funeral services were held at the 
Hamilton Funeral Home, Verona, at 
2:00 p. m., Tuesday, with burial in 
the Beaver Lick Christian Church 
Cemetery. 

KENNETH BISHOP 

Kenneth Bishop, 3-months-old son 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Bishop, Jr. 
of 5232 Madison Pike, Independence, 
died last Saturday at the Children's 
Hospital, Cincinnati. 

Other survivors are two brothers, 
William III and Bason Bishop, both 
at home; two sisters, Lisa and Carolyn 
Bishop, both at home; his grandpar- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ward of 
Independence, and Mr. and Mrs. 
William Bishop Sr., also of Indepen- 
dence. 

Services were held at 10:00 a. m., 
Tuesday in the Swindler Funeral 
Home, Independence. Burial was in 
Richwood Cemetery. 

MRS. HEIMER T. BURGESS 

Mrs. Heimer Taggart Burgess, age 
61, died at her home on South Main 
Street, Walton, at 3:00 p. m., Sunday, 
February 14, after a long illness. 

She is survived by her husband, 
John Burgess, and a brother, John 
Taggart. 

Funeral services were conducted on 
Wednesday at 2:00 p. m., in the 
Chambers & Grubbs , Funeral Home. 
Walton, with burial in the Richwood 
Cemetery. 



CARD OF THANKS— 

I wish to express my appreciation 
to each and everyone who was so 
kind and thoughtful to me and my 
family while I was in the hospital. 
Thanks for the beautiful flowers, cards, 
visits, and prayers. May God bless 
each one. 

MRS. GEORGIA OVERBAY 

lt-7* 



. 







CARLISLE'S ?«e£KIDS 



OUROIL GIVES ROOMS 
THAT WARMTH MO CHEER, 

NOBODY SAYS 

* IT'S COLD IN 
MERE/*; 



You'll be tops in hospitality 
when you keep your home at 
a comfortable temperature for 
guests and family. Phone us 
for steady fuel oil service. 



j*-: 



m 



C LOCAL TRADEMARK* Ik • 





by Sylvan Lumiere, Sylvania Lighting 
and Design Coordinator 

The Eat-In Kitchen 

The eat-in kitchen has a split 
personality: For people who are 
coping with small apartments 
the kitchen corner often provides 
the only eating 
place; yet for 
people living in 
houses, the eat- 
in kitchens are 
supplementary 
to formal din- 
ing areas. 
Whether the 
eat-in kitchen is a separate cor- 
ner table, a bar-like counter, or 
an island in the center of the 
room, it's the perfect place for 
feeding the young-fry, or enter- 
taining drop-in neighbors, or fill- 
ing up the forever-snacking teen- 
agers. 

While the general illumination 
for the room is usually perfectly 
adequate for seeing to dine by, it's 
much mbre pleasant to have sepa- 
rate lights just for the kitchen 
eating place. If the area is a 
separate table or nook, a gener- 
ously scaled hanging fixture sets 
the table apart from the purely 
functional areas of the room. 
Such fixtures should provide up- 
ward light on the ceiling as well 
as downward light and whether 
chain-hung or equipped with a 
pull-down device it should be 
about 30 to 36 inches above the 
dining table. "~ 



RATES OF WALTON ADVERTISER 

Local Display 60c per column inch 

Foreign Display. __(6c per line) 84c per column inch 

Mats or Plates — Deadline Monday Noon 

Classified Ads, Cards of Thanks 50c minimum 

(2c per word if in excess of 25 words) — Payable In 
Advance. No Phone Calls. Deadline Tuesday, 10 a* m. 



Legal Advertising. 



._$! .00 per column inch 



• 



—OFFICE HOURS— 

Monday-Friday 8 a. m. to 12 noon, 12:30 to 4:30 

Social News Deadline 12:00 Noon, Monday 

Phone 485-4962 




Hen* an£% Icum** |^ |*w*e» 



Rib Steaks 



Well 
Trimmed 



LB. 



99c 



Wein ers 

BACON 



CELLO 
Lb. Package 



59c 



FANCY BREAKFAST 
Pound Package 



59c 



PEELED APRICOTS, White Villa 



16- oz. size 35c 



RED MARASCHINO CHERRIES, While Villa 8-oz. size 39c 

RED TART PITTED PIE CHERRIES, While Villa ..16-oz. size 25c 
PINEAPPLE-GRAPEFRUIT DRINK, W. V. 46-oz. size 5 for $1.00 



PINEAPPLE-ORANGE DRINK 
While Villa - 46-oz. size 



•••••• 



5 for $1 .00 



ORANGE DRINK, While Villa 46-oz. size 5 for $1.00 

FRUIT PUNCH DRINK, White Villa 46-oz. size 5 for $1.00 

SAUER KRAUT, White Villa 28*oz. size 19c 



MIXED VEGETABLES, White Villa 16-oz. size 19c 

TOMATOES, Honey Grove 16-oz. size 19c 

ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR, White Villa 5-lb. bag 39 c 

STRAINED HONEY, White Villa 12-oz. size 33c 



STRAWBERRIES 



White Villa 

FROZEN 
10-Oz. Size 



4 for $1 .00 



D0GY DOG FOOD 16-oz. siie K 



Red Potatoes 



20-lb. 



N $1 .09 



FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OF $3.00 OR MORE 



Model Food Store 

FREE Delivery Every Morning— Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 
Two Deliveries On Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

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WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 8 



Remedial Reading 
Class at Twenholel 

The Twenhofel Junior High PTA 
mothers have volunteered as aides for 
a newly formed remedial reading class, 
under the supervision of Mrs. Leon- 
ard Bullock, Kenton County Reading 
Supervisor. This class was organized 
to help students who have reading 
disabilities or reading problems. 

Mrs. Bullock shares her time with 
seven different schools during the 
week. So far, Twenhofel has 10 moth- 
er aides and 2S pupils. Individual help. 
is given to each pupil. Its non-graded 
approach permits each child to work 
on his own reading level and to suc- 
ceed according to his ability. The ma- 
terial must be written for his age level 
and should be a subject area in which 
the student has a real interest to cre- 
ate a desire to read. 

There is a wide variety of materials 
used to achieve reading goals. Some 
are individualized reading books, SRA 
reading laboratories, flash cards, new 
phonics skill texts, visual aids, films, 
library books, etc. 

The^ollowing are helpers at Twen- 
hofel: Mrs. J. W. Harrell, Mrs. Bob 
Simpson, Mrs. William Campbell, 
Mrs. Ernest Prince, Mrs. Hubert 
Brewer, Mrs. Virgil Rust, Mrs. Herb- 
ert Works, Mrs. P. T. Gray, Mrs. 
Wayne Riley and Mrs. Curtis Noem. 

Anyone wishing to help in this class 
work may contact Mrs. Bullock at 
384-368?, or Mrs. Noem at 356-2630. 

SENIOR CLASS DINNER 

The seniors of Walton-Verona High 
School are having a roast beef dinner 
on Sunday, February 28, from 12*:00 
noon until ? in the school cafeteria. 

The menu will consist of hot roast 
beef and gravy with mashed potatoes, 
peas, roll, fruit salad, coffee or tea, 
and a variety of desserts. The price 
is $1.35 for adults and $1.00 for the 
children. 

There will be carry-outs, but you 
must come and get them. There are 
also tickets on sale now. 

Everyone is invited, so bring the 
whole family and invite a friend or a 
neighbor or a lot of friends and neigh- 
bors, and have a Sunday feast! 

The Wool Support 
Prices Announced 

The incentive price for shorn wool 
has been set at 72 cents a pound for 
the 1971 marketing year, according to 
J. Lassing Huey, Chairman of the 
Agricultural Stabilization and Conser- 
vation County Committee in Boone? 

Mr. Huey said the Agricultural Act 
of 1970 extended authority for the 
wool support program through Dec. 
31, 1973. The new legislation amends 
the National Wool Act by requiring 
that support prices shall be at the 
announced levels for each of the three 
marketing years through the end of 
1973. 

The chairman reminded producers 
that shorn wool payments will be 
based on each producer's returns from 
sales. The percentage will be that re- 
quired to raise the national average 
price received by all producers from 
shorn wool up to the announced in- 
centive price of^72 cents a pound. 

Mr H.uey said payments to pro- 
ducers on 1971 calendar year market- 
ings will be made beginning in April 
of 1972. 

FOUNDERS DAY AT 
TAYLOR MILL PTA 

The February meeting of the Tay- 
lor Mill PTA convened Monday eve- 
ning, February 15, at 7:30 p. m., with 
Mrs. Richard Howard presiding. 

Mrs. Bill Batson, Founders Day 
Chairman, presented the program, with 
Lois Riley, Rick Howard, Sheila Ruff 
and Tony Wilson presenting a delight- 
ful and informative sketch about the 
history of the PTA. 

Mrs. Batson introduced the past 
presidents who were present: Mrs. 
Malcolm Fletcher, Mrs. David Wint- 
ring, Mrs. Clifford Williams, Mrs. 
Robert White, Mrs. James Feagfian, 
and Mrs. Arthur Bingham. 

Mrs. Stephen Massey, a first grade 
teacher, was presented a Life Member- 
ship. ' * 

The following members attended 
the Sixth District PTA Mid-Winter 
Conference: Mrs. Richard Howard, 
Mrs. Elmer Lea and Mrs. Donald Wil- 
son. 

Following the meeting a Silver Tea 
was held in the cafeteria with the past 
presidents serving. 



INTEREST RATE DROP 
FELT BY SCHOOL SYSTEM 

The interest rate drop on short- ti 
term government securities has been 
felt by the Kenton County school 
system. 

Board members were informed by 
Supt. R. C. Hinsdale and Asst. Supt. 
Donald Davis that anticipated return 
on funds invested prior to their use 
to pay bills is now $59,000, a decline 
of approximately $4,000. 

They pointed out that government 
securities were purchased in January, 
1970, at a return of 7.7 percent. Last 
month similar securities were paying 
4.2 percent. 

It has been the policy of the board 
to invest money a.s' it is received, thus 
getting the taxpayer an added return 
on his money. 

BASKETBALL TOURNEY 
AIDS MANY SPORTS 

The state high school basketball 
tournament is the source of funds to 
stage a variety of athletic events in 
the minor sports across Kentucky. 

Such was the report given by Don- 
ald Davis, assistant superintendent of 
the Kenton County school system, to 
the Covington Optomist Club. Mr. 
Davis is president of the. Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. 

Last year, the Kenton County edu- 
cator said, the tournament realized 
$238,000. After tourney costs were 
paid, the money went for operating 
expenses and the support of state-wide 
competition in tennis, golf, swimming, 
cross country, wrestling, and other 
sports. 

Mr. Davis also said that the KHSAA 
is constructing a new building on the 
University of Kentucky campus to re- 
place the present office which has 
been purchased by the University. Its 
cost, he added, also will be paid out 
of tournament receipts. 

PTA Membership Drive 
Is A Success at Piner 

This year, the Piner PTA gave $5 
to each room that was 100 percent, 
and for 50 extra members they could 
receive $3.00 more. The money was 
to be used for whatever the teachers 
and students throught their room need- 
ed most. 

Teachers and students really took 
an interest and the Piner PTA is 
happy to report that all 14 rooms 
were 100 percent, with six rooms 
having 100 percent plus 50 or more 
extras. 

Mrs. Lockard, Miss Roberts, Miss 
Huffman, Mrs. Stephenson, Mrs. Clark, 
Mrs. Combs, Miss Morris, and Mr. 
Bradbury received checks for $5.00 
each. Mrs. Steinhauser, Mrs. Stahl, 



Mrs. Cummins, Mrs. Bailey, Mrs. 
Bridges, and Miss Ackman received 
checks for $8.00 each. 

The Piner PTA has a total of 561 
members. The PTA wishes to thank 
everyone who joined and made this 
record possible. 

4-H Achievement 
Banquet Is Held 

Thursday night was a big night for 
Senior Northern Kentucky 4-H'ers. 
The scene was the annual Senior 
Achievement Banquet, in Williams- 
town. Boone County was represented 
at the event by four young ladies who 
received awards. Five others received 
awards but were not present to re- 
ceive them. Achievement night is 
based on area competition, and the 
results were as follows: 

Carol Jacobs, beef, red ribbon. 

Donna Tupman, clothing, red. 

Patti Tupman, dairy, red (champ). 

Donna Tupman, dog, red. 

Judy Hetterman, electric, blue and 
champion. 

Darnay Darlington, field crops, a 
white ribbon. 

Marianne Smith, foods, blue, and 
champion. 

Donna Diedricks, health, red. 

Marianne Smith, home improve- 
ment, blue and champion. 

Lynn Kohsin, horse & pony, white. 

Paula Dunn, leadership, blue. 

On Dean's List at UK 

Twenty-eight students have been 
named to the dean's list for the 1970 
fall term at the University of Ken- 
tucky College of Nursing. 

Those from this area are: Jacqueline 
Behler of Independence, Mary Karen 
Case of Crittenden, Bonnie Elliott of 
Burlington, and Mary Koenig of Flor- 
ence. 



Basketball Nearing 
The End of The Line 

To Crown King and Queen 

Friday evening, February 28 will be 
the last home basketball game of the 
season for the Walton-Verona Bear- 
cats. The locals will play Covington 
Latin. This is also the night for the 
crowning of the Basketball King and 
Queen. Following the game, there 
will be a dance sponsored by the W-V 
Student Council. Music will be pro- 
vided by the Mimsy Borogoves. Ad- 
mission is $1.00. The dance will be 
from 9:30 until 12:00. 

Simon Kenton 48, St. Henry 46 

Defense was the name of the game 
as Simon Kenton of the NKAC de- 
feated St. Henry, 48-46, last Tuesday 
at Independence. 

After St. Henry grabbed a 5-point 
first period lead, Simon Kenton gain- 
ed a 7-point advantage in the second 
period to offset the Crusader lead, 
and this proved to be the difference. 

Greg Halderman of the winners 
led the scorers with 18 points. Bob 
Risenbeck had 16 for St. Henry, 
which is tied for first place in the 
NKIAC. For the losers, Ives added 
12 points, and Robinsno 12. 

In the reserve game, St. Henry was 
the winner, 34-32. 

Walton-Verona 91, Bishop Brossart 52 
Walton-Verona limited Bishop Bros- 
sart to a pair of field goals in the 
opening period and went on to a con- 
vincing 91-52 victory over Brossart, 
last Friday night at Alexandria, in 
the NKIAC. The victory was the 9th 
in ten league games and the 19th of 
the season for the Bearcats. 

The winners placed 12 players in 
the scoring column with Gary Ingram 
leading the way with 18 markers, 
Ferguson and Huffman added 1 3 each 
and Ramsey 10. "Roger Bruener led 
the losers with 15, and Wolfzorn was 
good for 11. 

The Walton-Verona reserves won 
their game by a 48-27 score. 

Simon Kenton 87, Bellevue 83 

Bellevue's Tigers continued to lose 
the close ones by dropping an 87-83 
decision to Simon Kenton, last Friday, 
in the NKAC, at Bellevue. 

A26-point third period provided the 
Pioneers with the victory after Belle- 
vue had come out of the first half 
with a seven-point lead. 

Top scorers for the winners were 
Davis with 21, Leistner 20, Halder- 
man 17, and Rust 16. Utz poured 
in 35 points for the losers, and Greg- 
ory added 15 

The Bellevue reserves won the open- 
ing contest 71=51. 



LIFE MEMBERSHIP 



GIVEN MRS. WHITE 

A Life Membership pin was pre- 
sented to Mrs. Wanda Jo White at 
the February meeting of the Kenton 
Elementary PTA. This is the highest 
.honor a unit can bestow and the 
money from it goes into a scholarship 
fund which is available to all teachers 
and future teachers. Mrs. White was 
chosen for this honor because of her 
willingness to serve the PTA and the 
school in any capacity. She is a sixth 
grade teacher and has held several of- 
fices and chairmanships in years past. 

Founders Day was also observed 
with four of the past presidents in 
attendance: Mrs. Charles Adams, Mrs. 
Willard Slade, Mrs. Johnny Armstrong 
and Mrs. James Whiteker. They were 
each given a gift by Mrs. Eugene 
Zomes, who conducted the program. 

Follwoing the meeting, a Silver Tea 
was held in the school cafeteria. • 

The Simon Kenton FHA 
Holds Scholarship Week 

February 8-12 was Scholarship Week 
for the Simon Kenton Chapter FHA. 

Monday was to begin "Prince and 
Princess;" Tuesday was to be "Bushels 
of Money" — but we did not get to 
continue with these because we were 
not in school due to weather; Wednes- 
day we had a bake sale, which turned 
out very well; Thursday we had a 
contest for the boy with the biggest 
mouth, and Friday was a contest for 
the girl with the biggest mouth. Mon- 
day through Friday of the week was 
the contest for Prince and Princess. 

We would like to thank all of the 
teachers and students for helping to 
make the week a success. — Vickie Vas- 
tine, Reporter 

Plan Aid to Combat 
Food Deficiencies 

The Boone County Extension Ser- 
vice is joining other counties in Ken- 
tucky and across the Nation in an 
effort to combat nutritional deficien- 
cies of low income people. Extension 
assistants who are para-professionals 
hired to work directly with families, 
will attack the problems of poor nu- 
trition and other related problems. 

The Foods and Nutrition program, 
sponsored*by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, has proven itself highly 
successful in the two years that it has 
been in effect. Several of the sur- 
rounding counties have participated in 
the program and have had outstanding 
results. 

The Extension assistants are being 
hired at the present time. If you are 
a woman who would be truly interest- 
ed in wdrkmg^wifbTlfisadvantagedHram- 
ilies, please contact Mrs. Nancy Nor- 
man, County Extension Agent for 
Home Economics, at 586-6101. There 
are no educational requirements, just 
the dedication to the purposes of the 
job. The Extension Service will give 
the assistants the training required for 
the job. The job entails a 20-hour 
work week. Salary plus mileage will be 
paid. Only Boone County residents 
will be considered. 

Kenton Dairymen to Meet 

It has been announced by William 
T. Straw, County Extension Agent in 
Agriculture, that a dairy and forage 
meeting will be held Tuesday, March 
2nd, at 7:50 p. m., in the County 
Courthouse at Independence. 

"Planning Ahead for Feed and For- 
age," Bob Walls, Area Dairy Special- 
ist, U. of K., and "Land Use for 
Maximum Production, I n c 1 u ding 
Double Cropping," will be discussed 
by Dr. Kenneth Wells, Agronomy 
Specialist, U. of K. 

Literary Club to Meet 

The Walton Literary Club will 
meet March 3rd at 2:00 p. m., in 
Fellowship Hall of the Walton Christ- 
ian Church. 

Hostesses for the meeting are: Mrs. 
Jesse Callen, Miss Louise Conrad, 
Mrs. A. H. Gaines and Mrs. Melvin 
Moore. 

An interesting program has been 
planned on the topic, "Ecology." 
Miss Louise Conrad will speak on 
"Ecological Education." Mr. Steve 
Wells' topic will be "Boone County 
4-H Inaction." 



And It's Basketball 



i 



Wajton-Verona To Increase 
Its Distributive Education . 

The Walton-Verona Board of Edu- 
cation has voted to increase the high 
school distributive education program. 

Mrs. Jackie Wallace, of Dry Ridge, 
has been employed as speech therapist 
one day each week for the remainder 
of this term in connection with the 
program. 

Mrs. Lois Jean Barker, of Verona, 
was employed as teacher aide for dis- 
tributive education. 

Supt. Earl C. Roberts said the 
school's distributive education program 
is now eligible for federal aid. 

Church League 
Basketball Results 

In the first game Saturday night, 
the Church of Christ defeated St. 
Cecilia, 66-60. Lockard and Butler 
led^the winners with 17 points each. 
Heuser and Powers were high for the 
losers with 15 each. 

In the second game Hickory Grove 
came from behind to defeat All Saints, 
76-69. Mastin had 28 points for the 
winners, while Janeway chipped in 
with 21. Bill and Mike Wetnington 
led the losers with 19 and 15 points, 
respectively. 

In the last game the Methodists 
defeated New Bethel, 86-73. G. J. 
Poore led the winners with 37 points, 
and Lloyd Poore added 20. Chipman 
led New Bethel with 25 and Littrell 
added 19. 

This week at 5:30, St. Cecilia plays r - . ki 

the Methodists; at 6:45, the Church Uincer SOCiety Meeting 
of Christ meets St. Patrick; at 8:00, The Boone County Unit of the 

Walton Baptist goes against Walton American Cancer Society will meet on 

Christian, and in the finale, at 9:15, Thursday, March 4th at 1:00 p. m., 

Piner plays All Saints. in the Health Dept, Florence. 



Tournament Time 

District play in Kentucky high 
school basketball gets under way next 
week. The 33rd District Tournament 
will be held- at Boone County High 
School, Florence, beginning Monday, 
March 1. According to tournament 
manager, Joe Stark, there will be one 
game each evening at 7:30. 

On Monday, Simon Kenton plays 
Conner; Tuesday, Walton-Verona is 
to tangle with Lloyd; Wednesday, it 
will be Boone County against Dixie 
Heights; Thursday, St. Henry takes 
on the Monday night winner; Friday, 
the lower bracket winners clash, and 
on Saturday night, the championship 
game will begin, at 8:00. 

There will be no consolation game 
but winners of the upper and lower 
brackets will advance to the Regional 
meet the next week. 

Students may purchase pre-tourna- 
ment tickets at their respective schools 
for 75c each. Prices at the door are 
$1.25 for all 13 years of age or older, 
while children get in for 50c. 

Officials scheduled to work the 
meet are Myron Reinhardt and Dick 
Vories. 

Attend the tournament and support 
the team of your choice! 

HOSPITAL OPENS A 
FIRST AID STATION 

In keeping with the theme of help- 
ing people help themselves, St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital has opened a first aid 
station in Covington's Model City 
neighborhood. 

Purpose of the station, according to 
Sister Dolores Marie Wuebker, RN, 
co-ordinator, is as much to assist in 
health instruction as to render first 
aid treatment. 

Joe Condit of the Model City ad- 
ministrative staff, said the station is 
currently being operated on a 90-day 
contract, which calls for an expendi- 
ture of some $9,600 from Model City 
and $7,350 from St. Elizabeth. 

The station, currently open week- 
days from 8:00 a. m. to 4:30 p. m., 
is located in the old Lyceum, 12th 
and Madison, across from the Cath- 
edral Basilica of the Assumption. 

Youth Involved In 
America's Future 

Not all of America's youth are try- 
ing to tear down the country just to 
get back at the people who have au- 
thority! 

There are 450,000 young man that 
are trying to build a better America 
b y g ettin g " in vulved and trying to 
change this country by use of the 
present laws and understanding. 

These young men belong to the 
National Organization of Future Farm- 
ers of America or better known as 
the FFA. 

These young men believe that Am- 
erica can and will hold true to the 
best traditions of our national life. 

Every year there are over 11,000 
FFA members from all 50 states and 
Puerto Rico going to Kansas City, 
Mo. Prominent leaders in business, 
industry, government and foreign co- 
untries are also present to pay tribute 
to "The Boys In the Blue Jackets." 
I hope the people in America will 
join the Future Farmers of America 
in observing National FFA Week on 
February 20-27. — Ed Cummins 

Possible Pre-Schoof 
Program For Piner 

Possibly there will be a pre-school 
at the Piner Elementary School. 

Mr. Webb, principal, is interested 
in finding all pre-school children, born 
in the year 1966. If you have a child 
of this age or know of anyone else 
who has one, would you get in touch 
with Mr. Webb at the Piner School, 
by calling 356-2155. 

Garden Club to Meet 

The Kenton County Garden Club 
will meet February 25, at 7:45 p. m., 
in the home of Mrs. Ralph Gouge, 
5426 Madison Pike, Independence. 

A splendid program has been ar- 
ranged on the topic, "Our Heritage — 
God's Handiwork." The speaker, Ed- 
win D<unon, will illustrate his talk 
with slides taken on Western trips. 

Members are urged to attend, and 
visitors are welcome. 

A specialist is a .doctor who has 
trained his patients to become ill dar- 
ing office hours. 



DETECTING AND 
COMBATING DRUGS 

Detecting and combatting the use 
of drugs by junior high school students 
will undergo an examination by Ken- 
ton County junior high school teach- 
ers at an all-day in-service training 
session Monday, March 1st. 

Supt. R. C. Hinsdale and Asst. 
Supt. Donald Davis report that the 
meeting will be held at the Turkey 
Foot School. It follows reports by 
national educators that the seventh 
grade sees the beginning of drug use 
by some students. 

How to detect it and how to com- 
bat it will be the theme of the ses- 
sions. ' , ' 

At the same time, high school fac- 
ulty members from Dixie Heights and 
Simon Kenton will consider it year- 
long self-study before the findings are 
sent to the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools. 

Elementary school teachers will ex- 
amine the system's math curriculum. 

Contracts for New 
School Awarded 

Contracts have been awarded by the 
Walton-Verona Board of Education 
for the construction of the elementary 
school building on Porter Road, near 
Verona. 

Meeting in regular session Thursday 
evening, February 11, the board voted 
to award the general contracting work 
to Schmdde & Zimmerman of Fort 
Mitchell, Ky., on bid of $279,817.00. 

Other contracts for equipment, the 
plumbing, wiring, etc., were: 

Kitchen equipment, B/W Metals : 
Co., Fairfield, Ohio. 

Classroom and office furnishings, 
Smith & Schaefer, Inc., Cincinnati. 

Plumbing, Knochelmann Co., Fort 
Thomas. 

Electric, Colonial Electric Service, 
Inc., Covington. 

Heating, ve/itilating and air condi- 
tioning, Perfection Heating Corpora- 
tion, Cincinnati. 

Lighting-ceiling, K«fene Corp., of 
Princeton, N. J. 

Structure, Romar Division, Keene 
Building Products, Princeton, N. J. 

Carpeting, West Hills Flooring Co., 
Cincinnati. 

These contracts were,; approved by 
the Walton City Council, acting as 
fiscal agent for the Board of Educa- 
tion. 

For additional information, read or- 
dinance No. 1971-3 on page three of 
this issue of the Advertiser. 

World Day of Prayer 

World Day of Prayer will be held 
on Friday, March 5th at 8:00 p. m. f 
in the Walton United Methodist 
Church, Walton. 

The Cv$t of the Walton Christian 
Church will be in charge of the pro- 
gram, and Rev. Robert Anderson, pas- 
tor of the Madison Avenue Christian 
Church, will deliver the message on 
"New Life Awaits." 

All churches in the community are 
invited. Refreshments will be served 
following the meeting. 

Even if you are on the right track 
you'll get run over if you just keep 
sitting there. 



Child Care Rally Set 

There will be a special Child Care 
Rally at Southside Baptist Church in 
Covington, March 22nd, at 10:00 a. 
m. The program will be presented by 
Rev. J. D. Herndon, Director of De- 
velopment of Kentucky Baptist Board 
of Child Care. 

Child Care representatives from each 
Baptist church are urged to attend, 
and all persons interested in Child 
Care are invited. 

™ ■ ' • ■ - 

A Founders Day 
Program at Piner 

The February meeting of the Piner 
PTA was called to order by Mrs. 
Shirlie Gilvin. The pledge to the flag 
was led by a student, Rickie Beighle. 
Brother Keith Creasy of Wilmington 
Baptist Church gave the devotion. 

After the business session, a room 
count was held. Mrs. Naomi Cum- 
mins, third grade teacher, won first 
place with the greatest percentage of 
parents present; second place, Mrs. 
Combs, and tied for third were Miss 
Roberts and Mrs. Roberta Steinhauser. 

The past presidents were honored 
with each one present receiving a tar- 
nation from a beautiful bouquet. 

Mrs. Roberta Steinhauser was also 
honored by being presented a life 
membership in the Kentucky Con- 
gress of PTA. She has been a very 
faithful and dedicated teacher for 
many years. 

A film, "What the PTA Is All 
About," was shown. This was very 
informative. 

Brother Creasy dismissed the meet- 
ing with a word of prayer. 

The seventh grade students had a 
bake sale to help sponsor a trip they 
wish to take. 

Refreshments were served and all 
had an enjoyable evening. — Pub. Chr. 



r * 



Thursday, February 25, 1971 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 - Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 
— Assistant Editor 
Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch. Foreign Rate, 6c Per line. 



The Eastern Star held its regular 
meeting Monday evening, Feb. 15, at 
7:30. Mrs. Margaret Fields conduct- 
ed the business session. Plans were 
made and committees were appointed 
for Friendship Night, to be held on 
April 19 More details later. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Northcutt 
and daughter, Joellen, and his mother 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Kenny 
Williams and daughters of Indepen- 
dence, on Wednesday evening. 

Mrs. Melvin Utley and .^daughter, 
Sharon, and Mrs. Harold Hahaspent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Dennis 
Lusby and family of Warsaw. 

Sympathy is extended to Mrs. Nell 
Fulton and family in the death of 
he brother, John Miskell, of Inde- 
pendence. 



Mrs. Wesley Burgess and Mrs. Mary 
Stephenson spent Thursday in Car- 
rollton and New Liberty. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Wilson 
were Saturday dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Pat King and son, Todd, of 
Cynthiana. Other guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. William Rorer and Gary Goodin. 

Mrs. Claudia Ashcraft has returned 
home after two weeks with her sister, 
Mrs. Lil Young of Park Ave. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Snell of Cin- 
cinnati, were Saturday guests of her 
sister, Mrs. Joe Stephenson, Mr. Step- 
henson and sons, Todd and Shea, of 
Stephenson Mill Road. 

Mrs. Edith Hamilton and Mrs. 
Mary Stephenson were Sunday dinner 
guests of Mrs. Lee Naive of Banklick 
Station Road. 



IB 1 



■ Look At This . . . 



JUST RIGHT for your summer place. Old house, i 
barn; ideal place for lake. Price $400.00 per acre. ■ 



Gayle : 
McElroy ■ 
Realty : 

33 Alta Visto Drive 

Walton, Kentucky 
Phone: 485-4297 




x\ 



COL. KENNER'S 



Wesley Rich has been on the sick 
list but is better at this writing. 

We are glad to report Mrs. Viola 
Roberts, who is a patient in St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital, is improving slowly. 

Mrs. John Gray has returned home 
from the hospital and getting along 
nicely. 

Mrs. Bernice Caldwell was calling 
of her sister, Mrs. Jimmy Smith, on 
Saturday. 

Mrs. Wesley Burgess was the Sun- 
day afternoon guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Horn and Mr. and Mrs. Way- 
ne Denney and daughter, Anna Maria. 

James O. Dudgeon of North Caro- 
lina, spent several days with his moth- 
er, Mrs. Hugh Fulton, and Mr. Ful- 
ton, and attended the funeral of his 
uncle, John Miskell. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hahn of Er- 
langer, were Sunday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Melvin Utley ,and family of 
Banklick Road. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Hudson and 
daughter were the Sunday dinner 
guests of his mother, Mrs. Lucile B. 
Hudson. 

Mrs. Lee Naive was the Tuesday 
dinner guest of he son and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Naive and son 
of Banklick Road. 

Miss Ree Steppler is spending sev- 
eral weeks in Canada with relatives. 

Mrs. Robert Yates spent several 
days recently with her mother, Mrs. 
Simpson, of Lexington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lawrence of 
Monterey, pent the weekend with Mr. 
and Mrs. James Lawrence and sons of 
Park Ave. 

Sgt. Joe Norris has arrived home 
for a ten-day leave from Vietnam. He 
is visiting his wife, Carolyn, and lit- 
tle daughter, Deanna, as well as other 
relatives and friends. He is to leave 
March 1st. 

Miss Jean Chambers is improving 
at her home on Chambers Road. 

I. J. Mosely, who has been a pat- 
ient in Grant County Hospital, is at 
the home of his son, Glenn Mosely, 
and family. 

Fred Jones has been a patient in 
the Veterahs Hospital, Cincinnati. 

The CWF of the Walton Christian 
Church met Wednesday with Mrs. A. 
J. Russell as hostess and program lead- 
er. Her program was on Latin Am- 
erica. Mrs. Gordon Garrison gave 
the worship. Members present were: 
Mesdames Lula Huey, Jack Rouse, 
Morgan Campbell, Gordon Garrison, 
Robert Eisenschmidt, Finley Jacobs, 
Jr., Al Feed, Frank Afterkirk, David 
Peebles, and A. J. Russell. 

Dr. Carl Fields and friend from 
Georgetown, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Ben- 
ton, and Mrs. Walter Whitson were 
entertained in the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. James Bonar arid family, Sunday. 



Mrs. W. W. Rouse entertained on 
Wednesday in honor of Shirley Lou 
Cook's birthday. Others present were 
Mn. Harold Schadler, M/s. Asa M. 
Rouse and daughter, Rebecca, and 
Mrs. Jack Rouse. 

The Bykota Class of the Walton 
Christian Church met Sunday night 
in Fellowship Hall with Mr. and Mrs. 
Layne Cheesman and family as hosts. 
Mrs. Jack Rouse gave the devotional. 
Members present were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Rouse and Mary Beth, Mr. and 
Mrs. Finley Jacobs, Jr. and Carol and 
Joy, Mr. and Mrs. Luther Stephens 
and family, Mrs. Gaines E. Huey and 
Rene, and Mrs. Lucille Rouse. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Dale Harness of 
LaPorte, Ind., spent Wednesday night 
with Mr. and Mrs. Bill Mastin and 
son, David. 

Mrs. Jesse Callen has been, ill at 
her home on Roe Street. 

Mrs. Edith Black is spending some 
time with her sister, Mrs. Naomi 
Sparks at Verona. 

Notes Of Servicemen 

_ Paul "Mike" Praither, USN, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Praither, 
has finished his basic training at Great 
Lakes, 111., and is now on leave. He 
left February 24 for radio school in 
Maryland. His new address is: 
Paul M. Praither, SNJC, 
B 23-73-36, Rm. "A" School, NTC 
Bainbridge, Maryland 21905 

Army Private First Class Dennis D. 
Scalf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon 
Scalf, 13 Alvin Drive, Independence, 
recently received the Army Commen- 
dation Medal near Chu Lai, Vietnam, 
which is awarded, for meritorious ser- 
vice. He is a rifleman with Co. B, 
1st Battalion, 46th Infantry of the 
Americal Divisio's 196th Infantry Bri- 
gade. 

Scalf entered the Army in January, 
1970, completed basic . training at Ft. 
Leonard Wood, Mo., and was last 
stationed at Ft. Ord, Calif. He is 19 
and a graduate of Simon Kenton High 
School. 

Army Sergeant John E. Powers, 23, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose H. 
Powers, 69 McCullum Road, Indepen- 
dence, recently received the Army 
Commendation Medal during cere- 
monies at Ft. Bragg, N. C. He re- 
ceived the award for meritorious ser- 
vice as a Military Policeman and a 
Squad Leader with the 82nd Military 
Police Co. of the 82nd Airborne Di- 
• vision. 

He entered the Army in March, 
1968, and was last stationed at Fort 
Gulick, C. Z. 



Appliance Co. \ at home in the future 



j 5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440 

■ 

■ SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS, 

■ REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS, ETC. 

(Over 20 Years In the Service Business) 



BankAmericard and Master Charge Honored 




- Self-Cleaning World 



In several decades, 
Mothers will be able to 
line up their grimy off- 
spring and have them 
travel through a special 
self-cleaning booth. Light 
beams and sonic waves 
will be activated at the 
push of a button— and the 
picture of shining 
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WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG & COLEMAN GAS & OIL STOVES! 



Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Thursday and Friday, 10 a. m. until 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 



Today, some appliances 
like ovens already have 
self-cleaning features, 
but In the future most 
appliances and fixtures 
will boast self-cleaning 
properties. Manufactur- 
ers are experimenting 
with self-cleaning bath- 
rooms, where hidden 
little water jets will hose 
down tubs and sinks 
after use* 





COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERVICE! 




Ask Your DOCTOR to Call 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for You — 

Nie's Pharmacy 

ILL Highway between Independence and Nicholson 



Piner 4-H Club Meets 

The Fifth Grade 4-H Club of the 
Piner School met Jan. 15, with David 
Mullins presiding. Mark Price led in 
the pledge, while Becky Menefee and 
Susan Cross led in two songs. Joy 
Cooper had the program, and Terry 
Terrell, Freddy Gosney and David 
Mullins told about their projects. Ter- 
ry Terrell, Susan Yeager and Jeannie 
Neumeister served refreshments, and 
the birthday of Miss Neumeister was 
celebrated. 

Miss Connie Lanford talked about 
some projects and the officers' train- 
ing meeting at Independence. 

The club met again February 12th 
and again David Mullins presided. 
David Hills led the pledge, and Becky 
Menefee and Susan Cross led in two 
songs. Helen Bachert, secretary, call- 
ed the roll and read the minutes. Joy 
Cooper presented the program. Jim 
Hummeldorf reported on his pig pro- 
ject, and Tammy Colson showed her 
apron. 

Mr. Bradbery's special education 
class visited us; also Mrs. Bobby Cor- 
nelius. 

We were sorry Miss Connie Lang- 
ford could not be present because of 
a death in her family. — Jean Neumeis- 
ter, Secretary 

Among the several good ways to 
achieve failure, never taking a chance 
is die most successful. 



Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Clifford of 
Cynthiana, spent from Wednesday un- 
til Saturday with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Eugene Webb, of Park Ave. 

Mrs. Pearl King has been ill at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Bernice 
Witty of Nicholson Road. 



Mrs. Bill Mastin and Mrs. Raymond 
Hammond of Walton, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dale Harness of LaPorte, Ind., Mrs. 
Jessie Hommand of Covington, spent 
Wednesday with their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Grastie Whitton of Max- 
burg, Ky. 



TRULY HOMELIKE 

A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 



Independence, Ky. 
356-2673 



-SERVING ALL FAITHS— 



>r 



Estate Auction 

SATURDAY, FEB. 27th - 10:30 A.M. 

LOCATION: Owenton, Ky., at the residence of the late Mrs. J. W. 
Juett, 301 Roland Avenue. In order to settle the estate of the late Mrs. 

J. W. Juett, we will sell the following real estate fl^p personal property: 

REAL ESTATE: Apartment house, 2-story frame, consisting of 3 units 
(first floor has 4-room apartment with bath, 3-room apartment with bath, 
second floor has 3-ro'om apartment with bath and is , furnished.) This 
house has city water and city sewerage, and is in real good state of re- 
pair. The tenants have lived here for a long time. This house is situat- 
ed on a large lot, 71x293 feet, and is now paying a very substantial 
income. This house is well located on a good street (Roland Avenue), 
approximately one-half block east of the Juett residence, is within easy 
walking or driving distance of main part of town, located in a good 
neighborhood. This property may be seen before day of sale by ap- 
pointment. Contact R. W. Juett, phone Owenton 502-484-2279, or Mrs. 
Kepple Roland, phone 484-2305. If this property is purchased as rental 
property, possession will be given March 1, 1971. If you are looking 
for a good investment and a good return on your money, don't fail to 
attend this sale. This property will sell at 10:30 a. m., so be on time. 

PERSONAL: Immediately following the sale of this prooperty, we will 
sell the following personal property at the Juett residence: 2 lounge 
chairs, floor lamp, Philco television, 2 ottomen, 3 smoking stands, leather 
top table, telephone bench, card table and 4 chairs, end tables, folding 
table, several straight chairs, electric fans, window fan, 6 wool rugs 12x15, 
pole lamp, lot electric table lamps, wrought iron table, electric ironer, 
Electrolux sweeper, 3 cane back rockers, kneehole desk, desk chair, type- 
writer, adding machine, writing desk, gas fireplace logs, sun lamp, Singer 
electric sewing machine (table model), electric chord organ, odd dining 
chairs, filing cabinet, pedal type sewing machine (Old Ky. Home), bam- 
boo shades, kidney shaped dressing table, doable mirror wardrobe, roll- 
away bed, baby bed and mattress, maple corner cupboard, metal utility 
table, wall cabinet, metal utility cabinets (double and single), wood 
utility cabinet, 2 gas cooking stoves, kitchen cabinet, Maytag automatic 
washer, 19 cu. ft. Norge chest type deep freeze, cooking utensils, 2 
kitchen stools, lot wall plates (hand painted, fine china), lot milk glass, 
books and bookcase, nice straw rug, pressure cooker, lot dishes (several 
antique glass china, etc.), 2 buffets. 

ANTIQUES: Needle point rocker, old fashion parlor pump organ and 
stool in perfect condition, piano bench, wash bowl and pitcher, jn good 
condition, 2 stone churns and dashers (1 large, 1 small), Gone-With-the- 
Wind lamp, solid walnut wardrobe, calendar clock in good running con- 
dition, 2 mantle clocks, 2-piece love seat, blue and white granite ware, 
Victrola and records in good condition, ice cream stool, 5-gaDon cream 
can, dog irons, fireplace screen set, iron tea kettle, hall tree with mirror 
and brass hangers, picture frames, high chair, roll-top trunks, cane bot- 
tom chairs, stone jugs, stone jars, lot mflk crocks, Daisy chum, flat irons, 
hand scales, lot oil lamps (small stems, wall oil lamps), rocker, 10-gallon 
milk cans, round iron kettle, lot old bottles (1 fiddle bottle), dishes and 
vases* dutch oven* fruit jars, etc, iawn furniture, aluminum glider, coal 
buckets, electric roaster and deep fryer, stepladder, garden hose, picnic 
table, metal lawn chairs, yard and garden tools, plus many other items 
too numerous to mention. 

Lunch Served On Grounds! (Not Responsible For Accidents) 

TERMS: Real estate, 20% of the purchase price to be paid down on 
day of sale, balance of the purchase price to be paid upon delivery of 
deed; personal property, cash. 

MRS. J. W. JUETT ESTATE, OWENTON, KY. 

CO-EXECUTORS: 

R. W. Juett, Owenton, Ky., Route 1—484-2279 

Mrs. Kepple Roland, Owenton, Ky.^*84-2305 

John Juett, Cynthiana, Ky. 

Paul Noel fir W. D. Sullivan, Auctioneers 

Carrollton, Ky.— 732-6721 Warsaw, Ky.— 567-6331 



IT'S HOME BUYING TIME! 
MAKE YOUR DREAM HOME A REALITY g 

We will be glad to help 
you own a home of your 
own. Stop at one of our 4 
convenient offices and we 
will tailor a low payment 
home mortgage loan to fit 
your budget. 

(-IRS7[ r EDEI?AL 

avinqs^Loan Association 

OF COVINGTON 
5th fir Main Streets— Covington, Ky. 




ELSERE, KY. 
8715 Dixie Highway 



LATONIA, KY. 
36th & " 



P 



DIXIE HIGHWAY— SOUTH OP WALTON 



Wolton Advertiser, WoHon, Kentucky 

Bones: Give me a glass of water. Professer: ones, why don't you join 

Jones: Why, are you thirsty? Bones: in the discussion? Jones: I leammore 

No, I just want to see if my neck by listening. Anything I would say I 

leaks! already know. 

ORDINANCE NO. 1971-4 

' An Ordinance accepting the work and confirming the apportionment of the 
costs of said work and levying an improvement tax upon each lot, part of Jot, 
or parcel of benefited property in the improvement of Stephenson Mill Road 
between the intersection of Stephenson Mill Road and Beaver Grade and the 
intersection of Stephenson Mill Road and Central Avenue, in the City of Wal- 
ton, Kentucky, by the construction of a new six inch (6) water main along 
said road. 

WHEREAS, Stephenson Mill Road between the intersection of Stephenson 
Mill Road and Beaver Grade and the intersection of Stephenson Mill Road 
and Central Avenue, in the City of Walton, Kentucky, have been improved 
by the construction of a new six inch (6") water main. 

WHEREAS, said improvement was duly authorized by the City Council of 
Walton, Kentucky, under the provisions of the Kentucky Revised Statutes in- 
cluding among others Chapter 94 of same, and 

WHEREAS, said improvement is now completed and James E. Ransom, 
City Engineer, has submitted the certificate of apportionment of the costs of 
aforesaid improvement to the said City Council of the City of Walton, Ky. 

NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
WALTON, KENTUCKY, DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: 

Section 1. WHEREAS, the improvement of Stephenson Mill Road between 
the intersection of Stephenfon Mill Road and Beaver Grade, and the inter- 
section of Stephenson Mill Road and Central Avenue, has been completed and 
inspected by a special committee composed of the following City Council 
members, to-wit: Robert Eisenschmidt, Luther Stephens, Donald McMillian, 
Dale Stephens, and James E. Ransom, City Engineer, and inspected by the 
affected and benefited property owners, after due notice and is satisfactory 
to them. It is therefore ordered and directed and declared that said work is 
hereby accepted as completed. 

Section 2. That the certificate of apportionment heretofore submitted to 
this Council by James E. Ransom, City Engineer, be and the same is hereby 
confirmed and declared to be cqrrect and to be the basis of the assessment tax 
to be levied against the owners of the property benefited by the aforesaid im- 
provement and fronting and/or abutting on aforesaid improvement as provided 
by the ordinance of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and the Kentucky Revised 
Statutes including among others Chapter 94 of same. 

Section 3. WHEREAS, aforesaid improvement was duly ordered by the City 
Council of the City of Walton, Kentucky, and was done and was ordered to 
be done at the costs and expense of the owners of lots or parts of lots," or 
property fronting and/or abutting on aforesaid Stephenson Mill Road, in the 
City of Walton, Kentucky; said costs to be apportioned among and bome by 
the aforesaid property owners according to the number of front feet owned by 
each. Therefore it is hereby ordered that a total tax in the sum of Five 
Thousand Fifty Eight dollars and fourteen cents ($5,058.14) be levied and 
assessed against the owners of lots or parts of lots or property abutting on 
Stephenson Mill Road. This amount is hereby apportioned, levied, and assessed 
as an improvement tax against each property owner affected as follows: 
Owner— Subdivision, Lot No. Feet Cost Total 

Slayback, Robert— D. B. 159, P. 129 165 3.240175 $ 534 63 

King, William— D. B. 142, P. 121 65.7 3.240175 212 88 

Roberts, Earl & Dorothy— D. B. 174, P. 152.143.1 3.240175 463 67 

Johnson, Hoard— D. B. 59, P. 114 264.66 3.240175 857.54 

Tomlin, John— 131.35 3.240175 425.60 

City of Walton— Central Avenue 40 3.240175 129.61 

Perkins, Paul & Joan— High School Court 

48-52 * 135 3.240175 437.42 

Hollen, Jarties & Fay, High School Court 

„ ,53-55 ...81 3.240175 262,45 

Hollen, James & Fay— D. B. 173, P. 327 224.4 3.240175 727.10 

Conner, Jack* 310.86 3.240175 1,007.24 

*2.9 feet of this belongs to lot sold on Land Contract 

• . * 1561.07 $5,058.14 

Section 4. Said tax shall be due and payable at the office of Daisy Hill, 
Clerk of the City of Walton, Kentucky, City Building, Walton, Kentucky, 
within thirty (30) days after the publication of this ordinance as required by 
law. 

Section 5. If the assessments are not paid within thirty (30) days after the 
publication of this ordinance as required by law, 6% interest, plus 10% penalty 
for non-payment of assessment, will be added to each of the unpaid assessments 
from thirty (30) days after publication until paid. 

Section 6. All ordinances, resolutions and orders, or parts thereof in conflict 
herewith are, to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed, and this ordinance 
shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. 

Passed and adopted by a vote of four members of the City Council of Wal- 
ton, Kentucky, and to be in full force and effect from this date, this the 16th 
day of February, 1971. 

W. W. GREENE, Mayor Pro Tem, Walton, Ky. 
ATTEST: DAISY HILL, Clerk, City of Walton, Ky. (Pub. 2/25/71) 



Thursday, February 25, 1971 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 



Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax report service 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where 1971 changes were taught. 



He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE! 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 - 1 Mile South of Walton 
Phone 356-2172 



20 Years Ago . 



-ORDINANCE NO. 1971-3- 



Thursday, February 22, 1951 

WALTON— 
— J Mr. and Mrs. Charles • Maloney of 
Walton, announce the forthcoming 
marriage of their daughter, Betty jean, 
to Guy Olen Carlisle, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. O. Carlisle, also of Walton. 
The wedding will take place in the 
Walton Methodist Church on Satur- 
day, February 24, at 7:30 p. m. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Chance of South 
Main, spent the weekend with her 
daughter, Mrs, Wilbur Lynn, of Crit- 
tenden. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Dealy and 
children hi Dayton, Ohio, were the 
Sunday guests of Rev. and Mrs. G. 
W. Hoffman, and daughter, Dorothy. 

Mrs. John Feagan of South Main, 
had her grandchildren, the Feagans, 
with her over the weekend. 

The Young Adult BTU of the Wal- 
ton Baptist Church held its regular 
monthly meeting in the home of Rev. 
and Mrs. B. C. Garrett, with an oys- 
ter supper, Friday evening, Feb. 16th. 
Those answering roll call were: Mr. 
and Mrs. Eugene Sizemore, Lena 
Kacaba, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Chance 
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Lebus 
Stephenson, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Praither, Miss Alva Flynn, Mr. and 
Mrs. Stanley Allen and sons, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence Wilson and son, Mrs. 
Burton Garrett, Jr. and daughter, Mrs. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We wish to express our thanks to 
each one who was so kind during the 
illness and death of our loved one, 
James Walter Poole. To the doctors 
and nurses at St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
to the staff at Woodspoint Ntifsing 
Home, to Dr. Waller, Rev. Tenhund- 
feld, and to all our neighbors and 
friends for their cards, floral arrange- 
ments and spiritual bouquets, and to 
the Hamilton Funeral Home for their 
most courteous and efficient service. 
Your kindnesses will always be re- 
membered. 
lt-8* -THE POOLE FAMILY 



NOTICE FOR BID 

Bids are now being taken by the 
Walton-Verona Board of Education 
(Superintendent's Office), to be open- 
ed March 11, 1971, during regular 
board meeting, on one space gas heat- 
er which has been used in the band 
room. Good condition. Ideal for gar- 
age or other small area such as cot- 
tage or trailer home. Board reserves 
the right to reject any or all bids. 

2t-7c 



Candid Weddings 

Color & Black & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, Walton 
485-4046 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation & Repair 
Precast Cisterns and 

BackhoeWork. 

356-5804 



Dora Pennington and son, and Mrs. 
Gloria Pennington and son. 

Walton Homemakers II met in the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Sanders 
on Scott Street, Walton, for their 
January meeting. 

The Walton Woman's Literary 
Club did not have its February meet- 
ing due to the bad weather and road 

conditions. f ■ 

BEAVER LICK— 

Mrs. Everett Mastin entertained the 
WSCS of the Hughes Chapel Method- 
ist Church, February 14. 

Joe Black was calling on Cecil Dick- 
erson, Sunday. 

, Miss Vera Robinson spent the past 
weekend with her sister, Mrs. Thelma 
Cleek, and family. 

Mrs. Alva Crouch and children were 
calling on friends in Beaver, Sunday. 

Mrs. Ray Sullivan and mother, Mrs. 
I. D. Isaacs, were shopping in Cov- 
ington, Saturday. 

INDEPENDENCE— 

The Simon Kentonian staff gave 
their annual assembly program Janu- 
ary 24, which turned out to be a 
huge success. 

The Bank of Independence has re- 
ceived the new FDIC Certificate 
which insured each individual deposit 
up to $10,000.00. 

Simon Kenton's Pioneers moved a 
bit closer to secnod place in the N. 
K. A. C. by downing Highlands, 54- 
34, at Highlands. 

Mrs. Margaret Phillips returned last 
Monday from South Carolina, where 
she spent a week with her husband, 
Franklin Phillips, who is in the Mar- 
ine Corps, training there. 

The Kenton Utopia Club held its 
regular monthly meeting at the Briar 
Hollow Beagle Club with Mr. and 
Mrs. Jack Hetterman as hosts. 

Letter To The Editor 

To parents of children in school: 

I think it is time we opened our 
eyes and see what our children are 
being taught. We have a few teach- 
ers in school that are not doing their 
job as they should. Don't mistake 
me, we have teachers that will bend 
over backward to help our children, 
and we have some that are just wast- 
ing gas to get them to the classroom. 
You take children that are easily led. 
These teachers are doing more harm 
in the classroom than if the children 
had no teacher. We should have 
laws passed that is a teacher says or 
does anything unfit in the classroom, 
out they go. We can have children 
expelled from class, but there is 
nothing we can do with teachers that 
are worse than the children. What 
our children are learning will follow 
some as long as they live, so I say, 
parents, let's check on some of our 
teachers. To the rest of the teachers, 
keep up the good work. God blessed 
some of us by having good teachers. 
—JOAN PERKINS 

It's better to give than to receive. 
Also, it's deductible. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We wish to express our sincere 
\1 — th a nk s to Dr . Huey, iriends, neighbors, 
and relatives for your kindness in any 
way during Bernard's stay in the hos- 
pital and at home. May God bless 
and keep you all. 

BERNARD RYAN 
lt-8* AND FAMILY 




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with a Savings Account at General. 



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6th & Madmm. Covinfton, Ky • 291-7219 4S01 Dine Highway. Eltmere, Ky. - Ml>*848 





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93 North Main Street 
WALTON, KY. 

485.7102 



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REPRESENTING 

.'T0M0BILE MUTUAL 
/iQJSjURANCE COMPANY 
NOME 0FFICE«C0LUMBUS, OHIO 



HpiWi 'OIH i WHT iMtH 



An Ordinance awarding contract for construction of a new Elementary School 
building, located on Porter Road, near Highway 14, and constructed for die 
Walton- Verona School District. 

a) Be it ordained that The City of Walton shall enter into a contract with 
Schrudde & Zimmerman, 57 Virginia Avenue, South Ft. Mitchell, Ky. for the 
construction of a New Elementary School to be located on Porter Road near 
Highway 14 and constructed for the Walton-Verona Independent School Dis- 
trict. Said contract shall -be for the General Construction per proposal received 
by the City of Walton on January 26, 1971. Base bid of two hundred eighty 
two thousand, five hundred dollars and no cents ($282,500.00) is decreased by 
the acceptance of alternate No. 1 and alternate No. 10 making base contract 
price two hundred seventy nine thousand, eight hundred seventeen dollars and 
no cents ($279,817.00). 

b) Further be it ordained that the City of Walton shall assign the proposals 
received by the City, January 26, 1971, for Kitchen Equipment, Classroom and 
Office Furnishings, Plumbing and Electrical work to Schrudde & Zimmerman 
per the terms of the proposals and the requirements of the plans and specifi 
cations. The assigned contracts and the amounts thereof are as follows: 

1) Kitchen Equipment; 

B/W Metals Company, Inc. 

33 Donald Drive 

Fairfield, Ohio 
Base Bid of thirty seven thousand four hundred fifty two dollars and 
forty five cents ($37,452.45). Itemized deductions of the equipment 
list attached to proposal reduce contract amount to thirty one thousand 
four hundred ninety one dollars and two cents ($31,491.02). 

2) Classroom and Office Furnishings; * 

Smith and Schaefer, Inc. 

2938 Vernon Place 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Base Bid of ten thousand one hundred fifty five dollars and no cents 
($10,155.00). 

3) Plumbing; 

The Knochelmann Co. « 

602 S. Ft. Thomas Avenue 

Fort Thomas, Ky. 
Base Bid of fifty eight thousand six hundred dollars and no cents 
($58,600.00). 

4) Electric: 

Colonial Electric Service, Inc. 

3718 Decoursey Avenue 

Covington, Kentucky 
Base Bid of seventy nine thousand nine hundred dollars and no cents 
($79,900.00). 

c) Further be it ordained that the contracts held under Letters of Intent 
dated October 30, 1970 and 'signed by R. A. Blackburn, Attorney for the City 
of Walton, be assigned to Schrudde & Zimmerman per the terms of the pro- 
posals and the requirements of the plans and specifications. The assigned con- 
tracts and the amounts thereof are as follows: 

1) Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning; 

Perfection Heating Corporation 

7306 Vine Street 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Base Bid of one hundred twenty thousand sixty two dollars and no 
cents ($120,062.00). 

2) Lighting-Ceiling; 

Keene Corporation . . 

Interior Systems Division 

Route 206 Center 

Princeton, New Jersey 
Base Bid of thirty six thousand three hundred sixty five dollars and 
no cents ($36,365.00). 

3) Structure; 

Romac Division 

Keene Building Products Corp. 

Route 206 Center 

Princeton, New Jersey 
Base Bid of forty four thousand nine hundred ninety five dollars and 
no cents ($44,995.00). 
v 4) Carpeting; 

West Hills Flooring Co. 

3407 Harrison Avenue 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Base Bid of nineteen thousand seven hundred seventy five dollars and 
no cents ($19,775.00). . 

d) Be it ordained that all contracts and assigned contracts shall be contingent 
upon the sale of revenue bonds for the construction of said school building 

Passed and approved by a vote of four members of the City Council, this 
the 16th day of February, 1971. 

nATCv «rrr r, , WOODROW GREENE, Mayor Pro Tem 

DAISY HILL, Clerk ( p ub 2/25/71) 



DO YOU KNOW... 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As Low As $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market 



COMPLETE INCOME TAX SERVICE 
Harold R. Weaver & Associate 

Farmer, Business, Professional, and Personal. 
Phone for Appointment or Stop In. 



Box 3, Big Bone Road 
Union, Kentucky 41091 



Phone 
384-3330 



Don't Be Late — 27 Years Experience ! 



B. Ce«De 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 



FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 



Foy - Johnston 

DIRECT FACTORY PAINT DEALER 

Wallpaper In Slock 
Wall-Tex Art Supplies 
Picture Frames ... 

LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 



264 Main Street 
Park In Rear 



Florence, Kentucky 
Phone 371-7921 



Thursday, February 25, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Save On These Kitchen Cabinets 






One 24x20 Base Cabinet, 
reg. 29.95 now $19.95 

One 24x24 Base Cabinet, 
reg. 34.95 now $22.88 

One 16x20 Base Cabinet 
reg. 29.95 now $17.88 

Two 30x20 Base Cabinets, 
reg. 39.95 , now $26.88 



One 40" 1-Piece Base and Top Kitchen ~ p fOne 40" Metal Wardrobe, 2 Doors, 

Cabinet, reg. 54.95 now $37.66 Mirror fif Door, Key Locked, 

One 30" Coppertone 1 -Piece Kitchen reg. 49.95 now $36.88 

Cabinet, reg. 49.95 ...now $29.95 0nfi Um w Mefa| Wardrob6f 

n /*■*§/*■* Q An _ reg. 29.95 now $18.88 

Dull [Oil " DOI13l 1 Avocodo 4 Door 40" Wall 

65 N. Main St., Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4495 Cabinet, reg. 19.95 now $14.88 




Home 
Agent's 
Party 
Line 

By 

Nancy Norman 

Rising prices concern everyone, and 
the food budget is often examined for 
possible savings. Shrewd shopping if 
combined with a sense of value can 
lead to savings, but what you do with 
the food you purchase is also import- 
ant. Here you'll find tips for saving 
both ways. 

While keeping a sharp eye on the 
budget, it's essential to serve tasty, 
nutitious and attractive meals. Always 
shop wth nutrition in mind — try to 
get as much nutrition as possible for 
the money you spend. 

Here are some hints for smart shop- 
ping: 



'Advance planning can mean the 
difference between high cost and eco- 
nomical meals. Plan menus for a 
week at a time, and shop fo staples 
no more than once a week. Frequent 
trips to the grocery store lead to im- 
pulse buying — and higher food bills. 

'Newspaper food ads give informa- 
tion on sales that can mean savings 
and ideas for menus (thrifty meals 
need not, be dull). If the store is 
conveniently located and you have 
storage space for sale items, you can 
save money. But don't buy anything 
just because it's on sale. If your fam- 
ily won't eat it, it isn't a bargain! 

*Make out a complete shopping 
list, but be flexible. If you find a 
better buy at the store, substitute. 
Add items to the list as you use them 
through the week, saving costly (in 
terms of impulse buying) "emergency 
trips" to the market. 

'Arrange your shopping list accord- 
ing to the layout of your store, saving 
time and steps. Get to know our store 
and its contents. Find out which days 



offer the best selections of meats and 
fresh produce. 

'Become familiar with brand names 
so you can recognize price changes. A 
price increase in one brand may indi- 
cate that you should compare brands 
and perhaps switch to a lower-priced 
brand. A price decrease may suggest 
a quantity purchase if you have suf- 
ficient storage space and can use the 
item. 

'Read labels to learn quality, size 
and weight. You needn't buy fancy 
grades of canned fruits and vege- 
tables, especially for combinations such 
as stews, casseroles, fruit pies or cob- 
blers. Lower grades are equally nu- 
tritious, and the flavor may be just as 
good as in higher grades. 

'Buy by weight rather than by vol- 
ume, package size or number for bet- 
ter value comparison. For example, 
buy bread and fresh produce by the 
pound. 

'Compare costs of different forms 
of foods (fresh, canned, frozen, dried, 
etc.). To determine the best buy, 
divide the price by the number of 
servings. The lower price per serving 



is the thriftiest choice. 

'When buying meats, cost per 
serving, not cost per pound, is the 
best measure of value. For example, a 
boneless roast yields more servings per 
pound than a bone-in roast, and the 
cost per serving may be less, even 
though the cost per pound is higher. 

'You can cut food costs in other 
ways. Improper storage and discarded 
leftovers are a prime cause of waste, 
thus of higher food costs. To avoid 
unnecessary spoilage and waste, store 
food promptly and properly when you 
return from shopping. 



Managers, Coaches Needed 

The Walton-Verona area needs man- 
agers and coaches for the Knothole 
baseball terns. There are more boys 
wanting to play every year, with only 
four or five men willing to manage. 

The "A" league, "D" major and 
mino*. need managers, and the minor 
has enough boys for possibly three 
teams. 

If you are interested, contact Lloyd 
Poore, 485-7196, or George Anderson, 
485-7361, for more information. 



Mr. Merchant: 



Here are TEH Solid Facts You Should Consider 
In Planning Your Advertising: 

1— This newspaper is an advertising medium that is WANTED — it is sought after and paid for, and the 
advertising in it is not an intruder in the home. 

2— Nearly all of this newspaper's circulation is CONCENTRATED in this trading area. 

3— The newspaper provides PENETRATION in the primary market by reaching virtually every family or 



customer in that market. 

4 — People read newspaper ads when they are ready to make a decision and to act — WHEN THEY'RE 
READY TO BUY. 

5 — The newspaper is convenient; it may be consulted at a time most CONVENIENT to every member of 
the family. 

6— People LIKE TO READ NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS— surveys show that 85 percent of the people 
want their newspaper to contain advertising. 

7 — Every issue of every newspaper contains INFORMATION AND PICTURES of interest to every mem- 
ber of the family. 

8 — Newspaper reading is a habit and a part of people's routine. 

9 — The printed word is MORE RELIABLE THAN the spoken word and it cannot be refuted because it is 
easily available for re-checking. More accurate information is obtained by reading than by listening. 

10 — The newspaper is ideal for comparison — items in a new newspaper may be easily compared with items 
in other newspaper ads. 

THE MOST EFFECTIVE and MOST ECONOMICAL 

WAY TO PROMOTE BUSINESS IS THROUGH 

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING! 

WALTON ADVERTISER 



WALTON, KENTUCKY 



TELEPHONE 485-4962 



*r 



ENGAGED 



LANDWEHR-BAILEY 

The engagement of Miss Susan 
Mary Landwehr and Capt. Richard 
Willis Bailey has been announced by 
s Miss Landwehr's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward J. Landwehr of Edge- 
wood. 

Copt. Bailey is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wayne Bailey of near Fiskburg. 

Miss Landwehr is a senior at the 
University of Kentucky. Her fiance 
was graduated from U. K., and he is 
an aircraft commander stationed at 
McGuire AFB, New Jersey. 

The wedding will be an event of 
May 31, at St. Pius X Church, Fort 
Mitchell. 

BURNS-KOOP 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Burns of 
Independence, announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Jacqueline 
Marie, to James Henry Koop, son of 
Mrs. Cecilia NL Koop and the late 
Henry J. Kopp, Florence. 

Miss Burns is a junior at Thomas 
More College. Mr. Koop is a grad- 
uate of the University of Cincinnati 
Conservatory of Music. 

No date has been set for the wed- 
ding. 

Green Clover 4-H Club 

The Green Clover 4-H Club meet- 
ing was held February 18 after school. 
The president, Judy Kelly, called the 
meeting to order. Patty Seng gave 
the treasurer's report, and Patty 
Brooks led in the 4-H pledge. 

The club raised $24.00 from the 
dinner last month. Mrs. Elmer Seng 
and Kathy Darning were there to 
help us discuss our project for the year 
and to plan the talent show. 

The club decided to have a bake 
sale on Sunday, Febniay 28, after 
Mass at All Saints. 

We all joined in games and the 
meeting was adjourned. — Laura Kuchle 

Recreation For Handicapped 

The Stepping Stones spring recrea- 
tion 'session will begin Tuesday, March 
2, at the Erlanger Baptist Church, ITtj 
Commonwealth Ave., Erlanger. 

All physically, mentally and emotion- 
alyy handicapped children and adults 
are eligible for the ten-week session. 
The program is to be held on Tues- 
days and Thursdays from 3:15 to 5:15 
p. m. A $10.00 fee is charged for the 
session. If a client is unable to pay 
the full amount, the fee may be scal- 
ed downward. 

Applications may be obtained by 
contacting the Stepping Stones Office 
at 5659 Given Road, Cincinnati. The 
phone number is 831-4660. 



Walton Homemakers 

The Walton Homemakers Club 
held its February meeting in the home 
of Mrs. Donald Rice, 22 Alta Vista, 
Walton. 

Mrs. Paul Beighle, president, in- 
formed the club the annual tea will 
be held at the Church of Christ, Heb 
ron, April 27, at 1:00 p. m. The pro- 
gram, "Heritage-Folklore of Boone Co- 
unty." 

The lesson, "Annual Flowers" was 
taught by Mrs. Donald McMillian 
and Mrs. Lillian Acree. 

Those enjoying Mrs. Rice's refresh- 
ments were Mrs. James Lawrence, 
Mrs. Paul Beighle, Mrs. Donald Mc- 
Millian, Lois Johnson, Miss Rachel 
Acree, Mrs. Mary Stephenson, Mrs. 
John Hetterman, Mrs. Edward Lay, 
Mrs. Frank Penick, Mrs. Lillian Acree, 
Mrs. Stanley Allen, Mrs. Ruth Glenn, 
Mrs. James Burden, Diana Burden, 
and Mrs. William Gibson. 

The next meeting will be March 
12th at 11:00 a. m., in the home of 
Mrs. Lillian Acree, with Mrs. Janet 
Burns serving as co-hostess. The les- 
son, "Make Your Kitchen Work or 
You." 

The Piner Basketball Season 

The Piner Panthers have just com- 
pleted their second season of com- 
petition in the county basketball 
league. This was a much impoved 
team this year and their mark was 
10-14, with seven of the losses being 
by one or two points. With the ex- 
perience of the past two seasons and 
the confidence the win, the team next 
year should show an even better mark. 
Coach Bradbury said, "I would 
like to take this time to thank the 
Piner PTA for their support and as- 
sistance in purchasing uniforms and 
equipment needed for the team. Also, 
I would like to thank Bob Cooper 
and Eugene Roland for their assist- 
ance in working with the team this 
year." , 

LEGAL NOTICE . . . 

Notice is hereby given that Kenneth 
Rich has been appointed Administrator 
of the estate of John Rich, deceased, 
by the Boone County Court. 

All persons having claims against 
said estate shall present them, verified 
according to law, and all persons in- 
debted to the said estate are requested 
to call and settle with the undersigned 
Administrator at the designated address 
not later than May 26, 1971. 

KENNETH RICH 
Administrator of Estate 
77 Alta Vista 
lt-8* Walton, Ky. 41094 

Those who disagree with us have a 
right to their ridiculous opinions. 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 

SAMPLES SHOWN IN THE HOME 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED & INSURED! 
ACOUSTIC CEILINGS INSTALLED 



M. SIMPSON - 341-7555 



CHAIN SAW PROBLEMS! 

Flooding, Dying On Idle, Cutting On A Curve? 

Your saw should be a tool, not a nuisance. Have it 
repaired, or for trouble free service, trade it in on a 
new, reliable Homelite, at 

CABER SERVICE CENTER 

5253 Madison Pike Independence, Ky. 

Saw Sharpening by Machine Includes Setting and Oiling! 

Phone 356-5548 

Winter Hours: Weekdays, evenings 5:30 to 8:30; 

Saturday, all day, 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. - Closed Sunday! 

For Faster Service on Saws or Small Engines, 

Come In Now— Before Warm Weather. 



\y 



s 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 25, 197T 




Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
mum charge of 50c for 25 words or 
less — over 25 words, 2 cents per 
'word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



For Sal 



FOR SALE— 1952 Ford tractor, set 
of plows, and rotary tiller, all for 
$1,000.00; also 1966 Dodge Vz-ton 
pickup truck, first class condition, 
$1,100.00. Call anytime, 356-2288. 

2t-8* 

PALMER USED CARS— 1965 GMC 
pickup; 1964 Ford 1-ton, with dual 
wheels, stake; 1964 Ford Econoline; 
1966 Mustang; 1963 Impala Chev- 
rolet. Priced right. Call 384-3258. 
Also others. Route 338, Big Bone, 
Ky. tf-47 

FOR SALE— 5-floor chicken brooder, 
electric, metal, on wheels, 250 baby 
•chicks, or 50 until frying size, good 
-as new, $50.00, or will trade up or 
down; going out of business; boot 
jack, baby buggy. W. F. Baker, 
Route 1, Warsaw, Ky. 41095. Call 
567-2177. 3t-8* 

FOR SALE— Two Charolais bulls, one 
7/8 and one graded. Marvin Mul- 
lins, 356-9816. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

FOR SALE— 400-450 bales first cut- 
ting clover hay; same amount of 
wheat hay; 90c a bale. 356-6218. 

tf-8c 

FOR SALE — Two country hams, will 
weigh about 12-15 lbs., 2 years old, 
sugar cured. 485-4422. 2t-7c 

FOR SALE — Trombone, needs new 
case, $35.00. Call after 5:00 p. m., 
Jim Lawrence, 493-5433. tf-6 

FOR SALE— 1970 Jacobsen 12 h. p. 
tractor with 48-inch mower. Phone 
356-9720 after 7 p. m. 2t-8c 

FOR SALE — Charolais bulb, 7/8, 
15/16 and purebred French blood 
line from Ali Baba Dessauny; also 
some heifers. J. B. Spegal & Son. 
Phone 356-7537. 4t-5* 

FOR SALE — New Idea manure spread- 
er, corn elevator with electric motor, 

* 4 new tires H78xl 5, door 6' 4"x3', 
also straw. 365-6822. 2t-8* 



"M" FARMALL tractor, in A-l con- 
dition, for said or trade for small 
tractor with cultivator; also John 
Deere "A" tractor. Call after 7:00 
p. m., 356-7667. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE— 1965 Dodge truck, 400 
series, very good condition. Leon 
B. Hall, 485-4087. tf-48c 



FOR SALE— Super "C" Farmall trac- 
tor, 2-row cultivators, mower, plows 
and disk harrow, wagon. Irvin 
McClanahan, Williamstown. Call 
823-6691. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE — Singer portable sewing 
machine, straight stitch, A-l con- 
dition, $25.00. Mrs. John M. Tay- 
lor, 22 Catalina Dive, Walton, Ky. 
485-4711. lt-8* 



PICKUP TRUCK — 1968 Chevrolet 
C-10 Vi-ton, 8-ft. bed, good tires, 
radio, and Ky. Inspection. Unique 
value. Violett Motors, 5042 Madi- 
son Pike, Independence. lt-8* 

ZIG ZAG SEWING MACHINE— 
All built-in features, automatic bob- 
bin winder, monograms, buttonhole, 
sews on -buttons. Two- tone paint, 
almost new, will sell for only $34.40 
cash; may consider terms. Phone 
689-7936. 2t-7c 

FOR SALE — 1,000-1,500 bales hay, 
consisting of alfalfa, clover and fes- 
cue. 824-6388. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE — International 27 hay 
baler", like new. 359-4346. 2t-7* 

REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills." 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

FOR SALE — Laying hens. Contact 
Esther Jackson, 356-2538. 2t-8c 

FOR SALE— 15/16 Charolais bulls, 20 
months old. Call 485-4493. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

FOR SALE— 1962 Plymouth 2-door, 
standard transmission, 6-cylinder, in 
good condition. 643-5510. 2t-8* 

NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE— 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cash registers, 
and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also cany 
ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. For free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. •' — • tf-8c 

FOR SALE— 27 feeder pigs, 8 weeks 
old. 643-5510. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 



FOR SALE— 2 acres, 5-room frame 
house, Wilson Road, Independence, 
$10,000. Rubbe Realty Company. 
356-9250. tf-6c 



FOR SALE— Horse, 6 years old, walk, 
canter and rack, gentle; 4Vi-inch 

■ cut-back saddle and bridle, new. 
Ernest W. Collins, 824-6391. 2t-8* 

ELECTROLUX SWEEPER. — Real 
good condition, with all cleaning 
attachments, even has spray gun, 
only $19.80 cash; may consider, 
terms; must sell. Call 689-7936. 

2t-7c 



... FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



FOR RENT 

Independence, adults only, 4-room 
modern frame house, full basement, 
electric heat, hardwood floors, tile 
bath, Independence Station Road, 
$125.00 per month in advance. 
Wayman Real Estate Office 
Independence, Ky. 



SECTION '^W 



FOR SALE— Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vaccinated. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

tf-2c 

FOR SALE— Feeder pigs, Duroc and 
Hampshire stock, 35 to 90 pounds. 
Gordon Moore, Old Lexington Pike, 
Walton, Ky. Call 493-5391. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— 2 registered Polled Here- 
ford bulls; Polled Hereford heifer; 
set 1-2-inch breaking plows for a 
Farmall 100-140. 356-5894. 2t-7* 

FOR SALE— Oak dining room table. 
with 4 chairs, excellent condition, 
$45.00. 356-6534. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. tf-49c 

FOR SALE— 1970 mobile home, two 
bedrooms, air conditioner, deep 
freeze and television included; only 
9 months old. Call 356-9816 or 
654-2931 after 5 p. m. 2t-7* 

TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, jeplace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing 
of all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 
249-A Hempfling Road, Atwood, 
Ky. tf-3c 

OVERBAY'S ANTIQUES— Collector 
items, bought and sold. Marble-top 
dressers, ice cream chairs and tables, 
round-top oak tables. V4 Mile South 
of Verona, on Highway 16. Phone 
485-4049! 5t-7* 

RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E. Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-lOc 

FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5 -speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007. tf-46c 



PART TIME HELP WANTED- 
Apply in person between $00 and 
5:00. Independence Cemetery, 5368 
Madison Pike, Independence. 2t-8c 

WANTED TO BUY— Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 

WILL DO ODD JOBS— Carpenter 
work, paneling, painting, light 'haul- 
ing, basement and yard cleaning. 
356-2550. 2t-8* 

SEMI DRIVERS (Experience not 
necessary) — Can earn $4.50 per hour 
after short training for local and over- 
the-road hauling. For application, 
write Nation Wide Semi Division, 
171 New Circle Road, N. E„ Lex- 
ington, Ky. 40505, or call 606-299- 
6912. 2t-8c 



LOST- 



LOST — Siamese cat, male, brown and 
black. Reward. Call after 3:00 p. 
m., 485-4031. lt-8* 



For Rent— 



NOTICE- 



FOR RENT— .46 tobacco base. Earl 
McKinley, 5960 Madison Pike, In- 
dependence, Ky. 356-2001. lt-8* 

FOR RENT — Two bedroom mobile 
home, semi-furnished; adults; pre- 
fered, rural setting; water and elec- 
tric furnished; $25.00 a week. Call 
485-4422. 2t-8c 

FOR RENT— Two bedroom unfurn- 
ished apartment, all utilities, carpet, 
drapes, appliances, $110.00 month. 
Deposit required. No children. Call 
485-7396. lt-8c 

FOR RENT — Two furnished rooms. 
Everything separate; heated with gas. 
Day, 531-9907; after 5:00 p. m., 
485-4047. 2t-8c 

FOR RENT — .58 tobacco ground. 
Ben Menke, Percival Road, Walton. 
356-6598. lt-8* 

FOR RENT— Furnished 2 rooms and 
bath; utilities; no children; White's 
Tower. Call 356-5818. lt-8* 



NOTICE— Auto Insurance Cancelled 5CrVIC©$ 

or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 



WATER HAULING— Call 356-5818. 
W. Binder. lt-8* 



Wanted- 



WANTED— To rent a crop of to- 
bacco in or close to Walton area. 
Have own equipment. Jim Houston. 
493-5592. 3t-8c 

WANTED TO BUY— Brass bed, high 
back wooden bed, round glass china 
closet, desk, round table, old toys, 
dishes, chairs, other antiques. Call 
371-6460. lOt-8*' 



WANTED— Reliable person to clean 
one day a week in my home; trans-" 
portation provided. Call 485-7396.' 

lt-8c 



— : WANTED :— 

Cash for Any Kind of Real Estate, 
Regardless of Price or Condition. 

Rel S. (Buck) Wayman 

356-5068 



NORMA'S BEAUTY SALON— 7252 
Walton - Nicholson Road, Indepen- 
dence, Ky., introduces Miss Carol 
Jenkins, additional hair sylist. Two 
operators now on duty to serve you. 
Open Tuesday-Sahirdav, 9 a. m. to 
7 p. m. Call 356-7420. 2t-8* 

ELECTRIC SEWER CLEANING— 

Cisterns and septic tanks cleaned. 

Pre-fab concrete , cisterns. J. F. 

Lucas Sanitation Company. Phone 

t . .356-2315. tf-5c 

I^LTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
—Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists; radios and stereos. Used TV's, 
perfect condition, guaranteed 30 
days. 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 
Phone 485-7616. tf-le 



SAVE m) TIME 

CLASSIFIED 





The ONLY sure 

stairway to 
family security 



Dixie State Bank 



Save by Mail! 



Walton, Ky. 

Phone 485-4121 




Interest Checks Mailed Semi-Annually 



Member F. D. I. C. 
Accounts Insured to $20,000.00 



we 



JIM'S BARBER SHOP — 335 West 
Southern, Latonia. Two chair shop. 
First chair, Jim Coldrron; 2nd chair, 
Vic Rosenstiel. Latest hair cuts and 
styles. 4t-5* 



COMMERCIAL BACK HOE— Cis- 
terns, septic tanks, drain fields, and 
general work. Lunsford Trucking. 
356-7527. tf-5c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE- 
Now^ written to everyone, if driv- 
ing record is good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. , John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington, Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 



ELOISE BEAUTY SALON— 125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. .Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf-29c 

JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. , tf-lc 



PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
Plumbing, 356-7274. tf-34c 

TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO.— 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac- 
cident, Retirement, Auto, Home 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Oc 

LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON— Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
493-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP-Cox 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m., 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. t f-38c 



INTERIOR PAINTING 

EXPERTLY DONE 
—FREE ESTIMATES- 
RALPH FOLTZ, 356-5987 



COLES BEAUTY SHOP — Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic ■ per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 

SEPTIC TANKS— Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS— Precast; sates 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 

DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 

FASmONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, personal 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fasbionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS — For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC- 
IATION, 30 Needmore St., Walton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 

YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER— In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines as 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoover 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Girard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 yean in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00, tf-29c 



—income tax- 
no Waiting. Call for Free Esti- 
mate and Appointment. Reason- 
able rates. 14 Years Experience. 

356-9690 

After 5:00 Week Days 



INCOME TAX 

ROGER SAYLOR 

Crittenden, Ky. 
824-4212 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111— 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 



WHEN DELAY IN GETTING MEDICAL 
HELP CAN COST YOU YOUR LIFE 




©IF YOU CAN'T 

REACH DOCTOR 

GET TO EMERGENCY 

ROOM OF HOSPITAL 

AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. 

THIS NEWSPAPER joins your Heart Association in pre- 
senting the life-saving educational message shown above, 
and in asking your support of the Heart Fund Campaign. 



Thursday, February 25, 1971 



Wtfton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



VERONA 

Flonnie Fdrington, Reporter 

Mrs. Lillie Cooke was calling on 
Flonnie Edrington, Sunday. 

Mrs. May Wilson was visiting Mr. 
Allie Chandler, Monday. She attend- 
ed the funeral of Lon Wilson. 

We are sorry to hear that Ray 

Gullion, Gene Coyle and Mrs. Junior 

Coyle all having to go to the hospital. 

Mrs. Ethel Webster was calling on 

Flonnie Edrington, Saturday. 

We extend sympathy to Mrs. Mar- 
tha Crase and family in the passing of 
her mother, Mrs. Carrie Burton, at 
Winchester, last week. 

Mf. and Mrs. Winfred Swearingin 
and children spent Sunday with her 
mother, Mrs. Allie Chandler. 

The Mother-Daughter banquet was 
well attended last Thursday evening at 
New Bethel Baptist Church. 
— *— - 
(Delayed from Last Week) 
Miss Vickie Leek of Cincinnati! 
was a recent dinner guest of Miss 
Karen Hamilton. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 

Mike on the birth of twin 

babies, a boy and a girl. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Lucas are the 
proud parents of a son, David, born 
Feb. 2. 

We extend sympathy to the Walter 
Pool family in the passing of Mr. 
Poole. 

The funeral for Charles Richards 
was held at Hamilton Funeral Home. 
Rev. Ralph Huffman was in charge, 
and burial in New Bethel Cemetery. 
Mrs. Allie Chandler spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Don Curry and 



children. Other guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. Hayden and Mrs. Susie Glore of 
Owenton. 

Karen Hamilton, who went to the 
hospital recently, came home Saturday 
and is OK. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Smith and baby 
moved last week from the Frankie 
Stephenson trailer to a house in Wal- 
ton. 

Mrs. Lillie Cooke spent Saturday 
and Sunday with her daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. John Lindsey, and son. 

Mrs. Lillian Stephenson is home 
from the hospital and doing nicely. 

Mrs. Kenny Vest remains very ill. 

Mrs. Kate Reed was calling on Mrs. 
Allie Chandler, Saturday. 

Fred Webster passed away last week 
and Hamilton Funeral Home had 
charge. 

LOSE DRIVER LICENSES 

Listed below are the names of in- 
dividuals who have lost their drivers 
license for the week ending Feb. 12, 
-a&_ released by the Department of 
Public Safety to the Traffic Safety 
Coordinating Committee, Frankfort: 

KENTON COUNTY: John Ralph 
Tekulve, 24, of 3004 Madonna Lane, 
Ft. Mitchell, until July 11, 1971; Don 
Smith, 28, of 664 Bowman Road, In- 
dependence, until July 18, 1971; Cecil 
Bowling, 18, of 132 Kathleen Drive 
Ft. Mitchell, until Aug. 2, 1971. 

BOONE COUNTY: Bruce Wayne 
Mize, 17, of 752 Peach Tree Lane, 
Erlanger, six months; Stephen Coe 
Head, 20, of 3819 Hope Lane, Er- 
langer, six months; Douglas Smeaton 
Manning, 46, of Route 1, Union, un- 
til Aug. 1, 1971. 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
March 3rd, 17th and 31st. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your. Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County— George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County— Donald Conrad_____824-6551 
Campbell County — Bruce Trapp_635-5129 
Kenton County— George Bach_____356-o278 



HELP WANTED 

Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to— 



BORON STOP 338 



1-75 & 338 



RICHWOOD, KY. 



TRI-COUNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL Cr COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING Cr REPAIR 

Trenchi ng & Installation of Gas & Water Service 



824-6665 or 356-7477 



KENTON COUNTY, Old Decoursey, near White's Tower: 67 acres of 
level to rolling land, ideal for subdivision or farming. Full price $800 
per acre. Will not split To settle estate. See signs! 

MADISON PIKE, Pleasure Isle; 2 acres, 5-room modern home, basement, 
oil furnace; immediate possession. Full price $13,200, $1,800 down, 
balance $125.00 peT month. See sign! 

SPECIAL! 3 Acres, 4 bedroom stucco home, no basement, oil furnace, 
stationary tubs, tile bath, built-in kitchen with stove, small barn, pond, 
chicken house; located on Dixon Road, near Piner School. The price 
is $12,500, with $3,500 down. 

1 ACRE, 3 bedroom brick, full basement; last house on left. Wayman 
Drive. Price $21,000. 

8 ACRES, Fowler's Creek Road, near Route 17; suitable for mobile 
home parking. Price $3,950. Terms, $1,500 down. 

6Vi ACRES, Kenton and Visalia Pike, near the Staffordsburg Methodist 
Church. Price $7,500. Terms, $2,000 down. 

19 ACRES, 5-room semi-modern home, near Oak Ridge Baptist Church, 
Route 16. Make offer. $36,000. 

44 ACRES, no buildings, on Bramlage Road, near REA, 4 miles from 
Industrial Park. May consider splitting. Price $44,000. 

> 

58 ACRES (more or less), 5-room modern frame home, 1 bam 96x36, 

H4-aere fishing lake, M-acrc tobacco base; 2-room cottage; gas and 

water, perfect for business or subdivision, across from REA building, 
Walton-Nicholson Pike. Price $69,000. Will consider split. 

144 ACRES, 2 barns, fair fence, plenty water, 2-acre tobacco base, 9-acre 
corn base, 35 acres creek bottom, plenty blacktop road frontage; ideal 
spot to build a new home; located on State Route 159, 7 miles East 
of Falmouth, \Vi miles North of Kincaid Park. Owner Leo Ryan. 
Full price $23,750. 30% down, balance 18 years. 

90 ACRES, Grant County, Crittenden, (more or less), 5-room boose, 
bam, 1-acre tobacco base, near city water and new golf course. Ideal 
for developing. 

2V5 WOODED ACRES, Piner, near Baptist Church. Pull price $2,750, 
Terms, $1,500. See sign. 

LISTINGS NEEDED 

REL S. (BUCK) WAYMAN 

FORMERLY OF REL C. WAYMAN & SONS . 356-5068 

Real Estate Sales of All Kinds— Including Auctions 

NEW AGENTS: 
Thomas Mershon— 356-9093 Jerry Hatfield — 231-5546 




AND THEN? 

Lesson for February 28, 1971 




Background Scrrpturt: Marthow 6:19-34; 
Luk. 12:13-21. 

In the motion picture, The For- 
tune Cookie, there's a scene in 
which Jack Lemmon's screen 
brother-in-law wants to buy a 
new car with the anticipated pro- 
ceeds of an accident insurance 
policy on Mr. Lemmon. But Lem- 
I mon asks whether 
{they shouldn't 
wait until the in- 
surance money 
starts to come in. 
j"Wait!" demands 
his brother-in-law, 
I "who in this world 
waits for any- 
thing? When Un- 
cle Sam sends bil- 
Rev. Althouse lions of dollars of 
space hardware off the pad, do 
you think they pay cash? Every- 
thing's done on a Diner's Club 
card!" _ 

The credit-card society 

The claim is not too far- 
fetched. I recently made a trip 
and discovered in arriving at the 
air terminal that I had forgotten 
my money, my traveler's checks, 
and my ticket. If I were to go 
back home for these items, I 
would miss my flight. So I took 
a chance and with one credit card 
traveled about 1,500 miles, stayed 
overnight in a motel, provided all 
my meals, and purchased some 
merchandise — all without any 
cash or checks! We are becoming 
a credit-card society. 

We are also increasingly a ma- 
terialistic society. A man in a 
restaurant called the attention of 
a friend to a heavy-set man who 
was writing down his order from 
a menu. "Look," he said, "that 
man is writing his autobiography 
from a menu." That may seem 
unfair judgement, but it is cer- 
tainly an accurate appraisal of 
some of us today: the god we 
worship is the Appetite, the alter 

of the Open-Mouth, the idol of 
the Well-Stuffed Man. 

As Paul put it, the real ene- 
mies of God have their minds set 
"on earthly things." We are an 
avaricious society that is gulping 
down material goods at a rate 
which they cannot be digested. 

Perishable wealth 

Jesus frequently warned men 
about materialism. It was one of 
his most frequent subjects. Be 
careful of the kinds of treasure 
you attempt to pile-up for your- 
selves. They won't last. Why? Be- 
cause material wealth is perish- 
able. 

Jesus singles out three differ- 
ent kinds of material wealth. 
First, there is the kind that, like 
expensive clothing, will wear-out 
or is in danger of being eaten by 
moths. This kind of treasure, re- 
gardless of how beautiful it may 
appear when it is new, will not 
last forever. (Have you ever seen 
in a museum a once-beautiful 
piece of clothing that is one or 
more centuries old?) 

There is a second category of 
material wealth. These are the 
goods that erode or rust in time. 
Bright and shiny when they are 
new, they do not remain bright 
and shiny. Years go by and we 
wonder what ever attracted us to 
them in the first place. They do 
not stay valuable. 

A third type of material good 
is the kind that like money may 
be stolen. Material wealth is par- 
ticularly vulnerable to theft. Re- 
cent newspapers have described 
the frustration of a number of 
wealthy actresses who have been 
robbed of their jewelry. The ef- 
fect of these crimes is to dis- 
courage them from either owning 
or wearing them. 

Beyond our wealth 

William Barclay reports a con- 
versation between a young man 
and an older man. "I will learn 
my trade," says the young man. 
The older man replies, "And 
then?" "I will set up in business." 
"And then?" asks the older man. 
"I will make my fortune." "And 
then?" "l suppose that I shall 
grow old and retire and live on 
my money." "And then?" "Well, 
I suppose that some day I will 
die." Once more: "And then?" 

We must remember that there 
is always a "And then?" 



LOOK 

/A/ THE 

WANT 



NEW BANKLICK 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL A- 
WARD FOR ATTENDANCE has 
thus far been tied by the Youth De- 
partment and the Pre-School and 
Children's Departments, with an aver- 
age of 34 percent attendance. (The 
weather has been a deterring factor in 
these grades.) We would enpoy see- 
ing an increase in our Adult Depart- 
ment, especially in our Young Mar- 
ried Class. We believe that if we put 
more action to our prayers (James 2: 
14-20; 4:1-3) we will enjoy our Christ- 
ian Walk (Eph. 5) and will find our- 
selves doing more for Him who died 
for us that we might live and have 
everlasting life (John 3:16). z 

THE JUNIOR CHOIR had their 
fellowship supper on Wednesday eve- 
ning, February 10. The sponsors were 
Mrs. Jackie Grayson, Mrs* Francis 
Beach and Mrs. Katherine Hopperton. 
A wonderful time was had by all who 
did come. 

A SPECIAL VISITATION PRO- 
GRAM HAS BEEN STARTED BY 
THE CHURCH, and is called the 
"Bus Visitation Program." It's main 
emphasis is on getting people to attend 
our church who live on our two bus 
routes. Over ten people have cove- 
nant with the Lord to become active 
in this ministry. We believe that it 
is just a matter of time before New 
Banklick Baptist Church will not be 
able to hold those who attend our 
Sunday School and Worship hours. 
We are certainly putting a lot of 
prayer time in this new visitation pro- 
gram that has been undertaken by 
this special concerned group of Christ- 
ians. To God goes the glory. 

THE NEW YOUTH CHOIR OF 
TEEN-AGERS recently organized is 



still looking (at the time this article 
was written) for a dedicated music lead- 
ers who have the talen to organize 
and lead this fine group of boys^and 
girls in this Christian emphasis. We 
just know that any such dedicated 
effort will be greatly rewarded in the 
future with great new leadership in 
our Church (Churches). 

WE ANNOUNCE OUR HOME- 
COMING IN ADVANCE for your 
convenience that you might put the 
date and other data on ygur calendar 
of activities. The date js Sunday, 
September 26, 1971. Our preacher 
for" the day will be former pastor, 
Rev. Don Davidson. The music will 
be supplied by the Southem-Aires 
Quartet, and the New Banklick Bap- 
tist Choirs (all age groups). There 
will be a dinner on the grounds served 
around one o'clock. Just bring a dish 
of your favorite food and come and 
enjoy the day with us. Brother David- 
son will be preaching at the eleven 
o'clock hour. More about the Home- 
coming from time to tine will be 
presented in the Walton Ad ertiser 
and Western Recorder. 

OUR ASSOCIATIONAL LEAD- 
ERSHIP READINESS CLINICS will 
be held on March 1-2, 7:00-9:30 p. 
m., Erlanger Baptist Church, 116 



Commonwealth Avenue, Erlanger, Ky. 
There will be areas where all mem- 
bers of the Church Council should 
profit: 1. PLANNING— To recognize 
the need for planning in time to get 
in' action for the New Year, 1971-72. 
2. RESOURCES— To become familiar 
with 1971-72 program and know what 
basic material will be needed. The 
age-division leadership should profit in 
these areas: 1. KNOW HOW— Each 
will be better prepared to serve after 
studying the book prepared for his 
age division. 2. COMMITMENT— 
To receive inspiration to be a better 
leader and to join with others to cause 
your church to strengthen its minitsry. 
Those recommended to attend from 
our church are: The pastor, Herman 
Spada, Francis Beach, Harold Callen, 
Dewey Switzer, Mary Johnson, Gene 
Parker, Albert Martin, Ray Mercer, 
Diane Schadler, Vema Brewster, and 
Louise Mercer. 

After a man has been married five 
years, he celebrates his wooden anni- 
versary; ten years his tin; 15 his crys- 
tal; 25 his silver; 50 years his golden; 
75 years his diamond. In other words, 
he is rewarded according to the suf- 
fering he has endured. 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 

Covington - Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
F. H. A. and Mortgages! 



f IB SHIR 






It's a long hike! Traveling to our goal can take a lifetime, but it's worth It. 
Every morning we start out on another stage of the journey, and it's up to us how 
much wo accomplish before nightfall. 

What is the goaf? What is our highest peak of spiritual development? What 
are the rewards? All the things we long for — peace of mind . . . perfect freedom 
• . . contentment . . . happiness. 

, Many are still struggling through the forests of unbelief and despair. Some are 
lost and confused in the mists of doubt. Others are already climbing the foothills of 
hope. Many of us will reach the summit If wo pray constantly for help and strength. 

The Christian scriptures are your infallible guidebook, and the Christian Church 
offers you a place of spiritual refreshment along life's road. Attend church this Son- 
day, and continue your journey with a lighter burden . . . and a lighter heart. 



Scriptural Mteted by tho Amwfcan Wbta Sodety- 



Copyright 1971 K«lrt«r AdVtrtl«lng Service, Inc., Struburg, Virginia 



Monday 

John 

10:7-18 



Tutiday 
John 



Wodnetday 

Luk. 

15:1-10 



Thunday 

Luk* 
19:1-10 



Friday 

John 

12:32-36 



Saturday 

John 
12:46-50 



us wn m t m<% W0Wm- tm^m^ mm wm 



The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 

HALL ELEC. & APPL SERVICE 

Phone 48S-4M7 Walton, Kentacky 

MOTCH-JEWELERS 

OS Madfeoa Ai 



ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 

Phone 48S-46M North Mali St, W slten 



BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PEOPLES-LIBERTY 



BARTH MOTORS 



READNOUR COAL & FEED 

05-45*4 



BENTON-BONAR DEPT. STORE 

Phone 485-4415 Walls* 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phone 356-2171 WaKea, Kentacky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or 371-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Keataeky 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 3584881 Nicholson, Kentacky 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

Phone 485-4131 Waltoa. Kentacky 



JOS. J. HOB AN INSURANCE AGENCY 

ROBERTS INSURANCE AGENCY 
Phone 485-4149 Walton, Kentacky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ah" Kyaa 4884181 Walton, Ky. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer 488-8111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 488-4181 "Year Local Newspaper** 

WALTON HDW. & DRY GOODS 

Phone 485-4088 fcttff Ryan, Prop. 

WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 

Phone 488-4188 Walton. Kentacky 



^_^___ 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



Thursday, February 25, 1971 



UNION 



Mrs. Warren Houston and nephew 
from Falmouth, Melville Dickerson, 
spent the weekend in Virginia, seeing 
her brother, W. T. Ammerman, Sr., 
m a Richmond hospital. While there 
they called on W. T. Ammerman, Jr. 
in Williamsburg and toured this love- 
ly old city. They returned Monday 
evening. 

Mrs. Warren Houston and Mr. and 
Mrs. Melville Dickerson spent Friday 
in Milan, Ind., visiting Mrs. Houston's 
brother, Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Ammer- 
man. 

Mrs. Bruce Ryle entertained at a 
six o'clock dinner, Thursday, in honor 
of the 25th birthday of the twins, 



Kenny and Janny. Those present were 
Kenny and Edna Aylor, Gerald and 
Janny Floyd, Steve ad Sharon, Mr. 
and Mrs. O. L. Black, and Danny 
Aylor. 

Mrs. Ralph Marsh entered St. Eliz- 
abeth Hosptal, Saturday for tests and 
x-rays. 

Bro. Ginn, Ken Ponder and Joe 
Henry Beil, Kenny Jones, Terry Jones 
and Bobby Wayne Ginn of Big Bone 
Baptist Church were visiting homes 
in the neighborhood, Monday evening. 

Mrs. Wilma Crow and Mrs. Berlin 
Wilson called on Mrs. Clarence Mc- 
Cain, Sunday. Mrs. McCain is doing 
fine after surgery. 

The young male quartet of the Big 
Bone Baptist Church will be singing 



Lunsford Trucking-Blacklopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 
OR TOO LARGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 
BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 

MORNING VIEW, KY. 356-7527 - 359-4667 



at the revival at Pleasant View Church 
on Thursday and Saturday nights. A 
youth group of the church will be 
with them Saturday night. 

The wedding of Miss Judy Sigmon 
and Wayne Ginn will take place at 
Big Bone Church on Friday, Feb. 26. 
Judy is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Buster Sigmon of Mt. Zion Road, In- 
dependence. 

(Delayed from Last Week) 

A correction: The man killed re- 
cently was picking up milk on his 
route, not delivering it. 

Sunday dinner guests of Mrs. Bruce 
Ryle and the O. L. Blacks were Mr. 
and Mrs. Kenny Aylor, Florence. 

Joe Garth and Andy Flaire after 
Mr. Garth's injury to his back were 
taken to Woodspoint for a few weeks. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Eddie Johnson who are parents of a 
girl, bom Feb. 12. 

The Jerry Aylors were Friday din- 
ner guests of his mother, Mrs. Bruce 



Ryle, is being the birthday of Mrs. 
Jerry Aylor. 

Mrs. Judy Steinhaur and children 
of Florence, were dinner guests re- 
cently of her mother, Mrs. Clarence 
McCain, and family. 

We are sorry to learn of the illness 
of Mary Woods and Thelma Marsh. 
Mary is in St. Elizabeth, and Thelma 
is awaiting a room. 

BEAVER LICK 

(Delayed from Xast Week) 

This community has lost two more 
of it's life-long residents, Lewis Step- 
henson, and Lon Wilson. 

Butch Crouch left recently for 
Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Masters have 
moved on Cleek Lane. 

Joe: Was Harry shocked when his 
mother-in-law died? Moe: Shocked, 
man? He was electrocuted. 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne— 635-2895 




Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pond 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 



get the weather out of your system, 



Forget it and refresh in a total-electric comfort 
conditioned home. 

There is a central electric system to make every day feel 
like spring. 

Consider the heat pump. It comforts from a single unit and 
switches from heating to cooling, automatically. 

The compact electric furnace can be housed in a closet as 
it requires no chimney or flue. Cooling can be added 
any time. 

An electronic air cleaner, when included, eliminates 
dirt and pollen. Housework is CG&Easier . . . your 
family healthier. 

Our illustrated brochure has more details. It 
will help you make the right comfort choice . . . 
whether you plan to build or modernize. 
Mail coupon, today. 



THE CINCINNATI GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY 
P.O. Box 960, Room 815-h, Cincinnati, Ohio 45201 

Please send free brochure. 

Name 

Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



The Union Light, Heat and Power Company 
Serving Northern Kentucky since 1901 



1 




INDOCHINA 



by 

M. GENE SNYDER 

U. S. Congressman 

4th District, Kentucky 




To date there has been very little 
reaction in Washington to the military 
operation undertaken by the South 
Vietnamese in Laos. Except for the 
antics of a few hardcore "student" 
demonstrators and the inevitable hand- 
wringing, in politer circles, about wid- 
ening the war in Indochina, there has 
been no outburst such as the ones we 
saw following the Cambodian raid last 
May — yet. Even the President's most 
vocal critics in the Senate have been 
untypically quiet. 

This reserve about attacking the 
President's powers as Commander-in- 
Chief seems to stem from the measur- 
able results of the Cambodian oper- 
ation. It was successful in cutting 
Hanoi's seaborne supply line and pro- 
duced a subsequent reduction of North 
Vietnamese military pressure against 
our troops in the lower two-thirds of 
South Vietnam. It left the Ho Chi 
' Minh trail through Laos as the only 
supply route and privileged sanctuary 
for the men and material headed 
south to the communist forces fight- 
ing in South Vietnam and Cambodia. 

Now the obvious intent _ is to cut 
this remaining supply line, and if pos- 
sible, keep it cut. The reason for the 
attention to this remote area is that 



it is a unique and irreplacablc lifeline 
for Hanoi's insidious ambitions in Indo- 
china. Cut this lifeline, even tempor- 
arily, and Hanoi must take the hard- 
est kind of look at their warmaking 
potential and future prospects. What 
their response to the threat will be 
is uncertain. 

There is always an inherent rick in 
such a bold operation as our allies 
have undertaken but even a partial 
success can only result in insuring the 
speeding up of our troop withdrawal 
schedule. 

It promises even more than that. 
If the South Vietnamese are able to 
cut and hold the trail, or to fight and 
defeat a numerically superior force, 
or even if the enemy refuses to fight 
under the circumstances, the success 
of our Vietnamization program is as- 
sured by the marking of the most 
dramatic decline of the North Viet- 
namese fighting power and an equiv- 
alent improvement in the military po- 
tential of the South Vietnamese army. 

This is an operation that should 
have taken place long ago. It could 
be responsible for not only our suc- 
cessful troop withdrawel but could 
bring an effective end to the war in 
most of Indochina. 



91.6 ACRES — Located on State Highway, near Expressways; 6-room 
home, bath, no furnace, new stock bam 90 feet long, city water in 
barn and housc^sdo, new corn crib, double garage, also large tobacco 
barn, stripping room, over 2-acre base, 2 5 -acre corn base, all clean, 
level to rolling, priced to sell. 

237.88 ACRES — 5-room modern house, 4 barns, abundance of water, 
some bottom land, tobacco base 2.52, corn base, most all clean in 
long ridges and all can be mowed, fine stock farm; will consider some- 
thing on trade — price reduced. 

105 ACRES — Grant County, State Highway; real, real close to Williams- 
town; 7-room Colonial home, semi-modern, dairy barn, milk house, 
running water, tobacco barn, stripping room; owner has purchased 
home in town — says "sell quick." 

26 ACRES — Union, Ky. Outstanding acreage, ideally located for develop- 
ment; city water and gas available. 

1 ACRE — Route 42; can be sold to park trailer on. Owner will finance. 

14.3 ACRES— With large lake. 

20 ACRES — Beautiful ground, partly wooded. 

(The above two tracts are approximately 2Vi miles from 1-71, and 5 
miles from 1-75— close to water line). 

108 ACRES — Two bedroom home, not very old, bath, furnace, laundry, 
2 cisterns, attached garage, large combination barn, storage shed, 1.25 
base; located in Gallatin County. 

60 ACRES — Two bedroom home, running water, gas furnace, has large 
frontage on Ky. 338. 

4 ACRES — Vandale Mobile Home, real beauty, located in Boone County. 

61 ACRESM5ood highway, 1.5 base* some timber, plenty of water; 
owner will help finance. 

50 ACRES — Near Union; beautiful land, all clean, lays perfect, excellent 
financing available. 

VERONA, KY. — 8-room Colonial- type home, part basement, 4-car gar- 
age, 2 large porches, immediate possession, lot 100x325 feet. This is 
a real good piece of property; will consider selling on contract. 

6V2 ACRES — On State Highway; owner will finance. 

If You Have Anything To Sell— Call Us For Fast Service! 

R. P. COLEMAN REALTY 

7801 U. S. 42 - Florence, Kentucky 

PHONES: 371-6600, 283-2737 

CHARLES BRANUM, Broker-Salesman — 371-4082 




Don't let Tight Money keep you from completing 
plans for your new home. We can help you suc- 
cessfully complete the mortgage details with the 
advice of our specialists. They can also advise 
you of low interest rates with payments tailored 
to your budget and the advantage of low closing 
costs. It's just one more benefit of doing business 
with . . . 

ROSEDALE FEDERAL 

SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

"IN THE HEAjn~ OF LATONIA" 

CAROLINE AND SOUTHERN AVENUE 

COVINGTON, KY. PHONE 431-7723 



'Thursday, February 25, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



-DEATHS- 

JAMES A. MARTIN 

James A. Martin, 47, of 756 Harris 
Pike, Independence, died Thursday, 
Feb. 18, in St. Elizabeth Hospital. 

Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. 
Evelyn Martin; two daughters, Miss 
Darlene Martin, at home, and Mrs. 
Sherry Noakes, of Covington; four 
sisters, Mrs. Lola Goodman of Inde- 
pendence, Mrs. Mae Tredway of Cov- 
ingtonp-Mrs. Flora Johnson, of Detroit, 
Mich., and Mrs. Elsie Carpenter of 
Florence, and two brothers, Arthur 
Martin of Walton, and Walter Martin 
of Covington. 

Services were held at 1:00 p.. to., 
Monday at the Maryland Avenue 
Pentecostal Church, Latonia, with 
burial in Floral Hills Cemetery. Conn- 
ley Bros, had charge. 

JOHN R. MISKELL 

John R. Miskell, 80, of 50 Way- 
man Drive, Independence, died at 
12:30 p. m., Tuesday, Feb. 16, at 
the VA Hospital, Cincinnati. 

He was a retired Boone County 
farmer, and a veteran of World Wai 
One. 

Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. 
Ellen Maher, of Independence; a son, 
John S. Miskell of Bellevue;a brother, 
Everett Miskell of Norwood, Ohio; 
two sisters, Mrs. Nell Fulton of Wal- 
ton, and Mrs. Mayme Cole of Cov- 
ington. 

Mass of Resurrection was held at 
10:30 a. m., last Friday, at St. Cecilia 
Church, Independence, with burial in 
Beaver Lick Cemetery. Swindler of 
Independence, had charge. 

MRS. MARGRET SMITH SNOW 

Mrs. Margret Smith Snow, 82, a 
resident of Beaver Lick, died suddenly 
Monday, February 22, while visiting 
her son, William S. Friend, of War- 
saw. She died of a heart attack. She 



was a member of the Beaver Lick 
Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Snow is survived \ff a son, 
William S. Friend, of Warsaw; one 
grandson, R. S. Friend, of Union, and 
one great-granddaughter, Joyce Maxine 
Friend; three sisters, Mrs. Eliza Fry- 
man of Leavenworth, Kan., Miss Pearl 
Snow, and Mrs. Eva Mryman, both of 
Union, and one brother, Charlie Snow 
o# Union. 

Funeral services were conducted on 
Wednesday at 10:00 a. m., in the 
Carlton Funeral Home, Warsaw, with 
burial in Hughes Chapel Cemetery at 
Beaver. 

MRS. SHIRLEY R. FERGUSON * 

Mrs. Shirley Rice Ferguson, 66, died 
at 1:30 a. m., Friday, Feb. 19, at 
- Booth Hospital, Covington, after a 
long illness. 

She was the last member of a 
prominent Boone County family, and 
active in historical and fraternal or- 
ganizations. 

She and her husband lived in a 
150-year-old colonial home on 700 
acres of rolling farmland on U. S. 
Highway 42, near Union. 

Mr. Ferguson retired in 1968 as a 
member of the Kentucky Board of 
Probation and Parole. 

Mrs. Ferguson was a member of 
the Boone County DAR, Kentucky 
Historical Society, Filson Club of 
Louisville, Germania Society, Union 
Baptist Church, and the Union Chap- 
ter, Order of Eastern Star. 

Survivors include her husband, Wal- 
ter Ferguson; two sons, Boone County 
Judge Bruce Ferguson, of Union, and 
Walter B. Ferguson, of Lexington, al- 
so six grandchildren. 

Services were held at 10:30 a. m., 
Monday at the Chambers & Grubbs 
Funeral Home, Walton. Burial was in 
Highland Cimetery, Ft. Mitchell. 

I owe all my success in life to hav- 
ing been always a quarter of an hour 
beforehand. — Lord Nelson 




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COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
^ ACRE 

-by- 
JOE CLAXON 



The shift from an agricultural to an 
urban way of life b^as brought us in- 
comparable material prosperity. But 
progress exacts its price — for many 
people the world of field and forest 
is nearly a closed book. 

Nature belongs in our lives, not as 
an occasional luxury, but as part of 
our inherent biological need. Over the 
centuries, for example, poets and mys- 
tics have drawn countless metaphors 
from nature to explain the workings 
of the human mind and soul. Wise 
men of many cultures and religions 
have periodically retreated to the 
"wilderness" to regain their intellect- 
ual and spiritual strength. More re- 
cently, biological and socal scientists 
have stressed the importance of direct 
contact with nature for phychic health. 

Despite this vital need, many citi- 
zens of city and town dwell in con- 
crete and asphalt canyons, their lives 
not nourished by a blade of grass, 
much less a monarch tree. And with 
each passing year, expanding megalo- 
polis claims ever more open space for 
homes, factories, airports and roads. 

We should plant all available space: 
in street triangles, in backyards, on 
window sills, on roof tops, along the 
highways. The more grass, flowers, 
vegetables, shrubs and trees we plant, 
the more we do to arrest the pollu- 
tion of air, water and earth. 

Perhaps most important of all, we 
should involve children and thereby 
sow some seeds for healthier and more 
humane surroundings tomorrow. Work- 
ing with children, parents and teach- 
ers can instill compassion and con- 
cern for growing things. Many child- 
ren who help tend a garden perceive 
the unity of life, thus fostering an 
^ecological conscience — a vital trait 
when their generation assumes its civic- 
role. 

Today there is much clamor about 
repairing the damages wrought against 
our natural heritage. Too often, how- 
ever, sincere concern stops at protest 
or mere rhetoric; people fail to realize 
that this immense task calls for per- 
sonal responsibility. Every citizen, 
whether townsman or countryman, 
must care and be involved. Let's start 
in our own backyards. 

LEGAL NOTICE .. . 

According to Kentucky Statutes gov- 
erning such matters, we will sell at 
our place of business at 134 North 
Main Street, 'Walton, Kentucky, one 
1959 Rambler station wagon, serial 
number A28346, said sale to be held 
Monday, March 22, 1971 at 10:00 a. 
m., to satisfy charges for repairs bills 
and storage. 

BARTH MOTORS 
3t-8c Franklin Barth 




SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 1971 



10:00 A. M. 



At Ro-Mary Farm (formerly the Bedinger Farm) on Richwood Road, 3 Miles South- 
west of 1-75 and 5 Miles North of Walton, Ky., Boone County. Take Richwood Exit 
West and follow arrows — 

90 HEAD OF HOLSTEIN COWS, HEIFERS, STEERS, AND BULLS— 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lawson and Mary Fanning, owners and operators of this dairy 
herd, are going out of the dairy business due to health and shortage of labor. 
48 head of Holstein milk cows, some in high production now, some with calves by 
side, and some heavy springers. There are 5 with calves by side, 3 heavy springers, 
7 dry cows, 2 cows giving 60 lbs. per day, 1 cow giving 55 lbs. per day, 1 COW giving 
50 lbs. per day, 3 cows giving 45 lbs. per day, 1 1 cows givirfg 40 lbs. per day, 3 cows 
giving 35 lbs. per day, 11 cows giving 30 lbs. per day; 16 yearling; heifers; 24 heifers 
and steers (6 months and under). All TB and Bangs tested. 

Also 1962 Farmall 230 tractor with front mount cultivators, hydraulic fast hitch. 

LUNCH SERVED L 



Sale Conducted By 

COL CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

REALTORS-AUCTION EERS-APPRAISORS 
4 East Southern Avenue, Covington, Ky. - Main Street, Williamstown, Ky. 

431-4222 ANYTIME 



CLERK: Ron Goodridge 



CASHIER: Julia Blair 



If you are planning an auction, call the auctioneer direct, with no middle man. Call Col. Cecil Wayman, male 
no mistake, the number is 43M222— if calling from out of phone range, ask operator for ENTERPRISE 4222 
—no charge. P. S. I would like to list your farm for sale. 



BIRTHS 



A son, Eric Todd, weighing 6 lbs., 
8 ozs., was born Friday, February 19, 
at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Covington, 
to David and Carol Gamble of North 
Main St., Walton. The grandparents 
are Mr. and Mrs. Russell Groger and 
Mrs. Martha Gamble, Walton. 

Bom to Ralph and Faye Baker of 
Union, a son, at 10:35 p. m., Feb. 
13, at St. Elizabeth Hospital. The 
Bakers are former Walton residents. 

Bit 'N' SPUR CLUB 

The Bit and Spur 4-H Club met at 
the home of Sarah Daugherty, Feb. 
5. A committee was formed with 
Debbie Harden as chairman to make 
plans for a bake sale, April JO. 

Two demonstrations were given, one 
by Sarah Daugherty on parts of a 
horse, and one by Dick Ockerman on 
parts of an English saddle and bridle. 

Refreshments were served by Mrs. 
Daugherty at the end of the meeting. 

The next meeting is to be held at 
the home of Dick Ockerman, March 
5th. Anyone interested in joining, 
please come to this meeting. — Rep. v . 



Slaifordsburg 

Mrs. J. A. Keeney, Reporter 

< 

Quite a different climate from last 
time I wrote the* news. We can't ex- 
pect it to last but -it is so pleasant, to 
get out of doors without being muff- 
led to ones ears. 

Several of the women of the Home- 
makers Club met at Mrs. Marie Rich's 
on Thursday afternoon to work on a 
civic project. 

We were very glad to welcome Mr. 
Carsee Brinkley home from the hos- 
pital where he had been for a couple 
of weeks. 

The last word we had from Ran- 
dall Wagner was that the treatments 
are quite hard on him. We hope and 
pray that they may prove effective. 

We were pleased to have a talk on 
Friday evening with W. L. Stephens, 
who is visiting his mother for a few 
hours on the weekend. 

I am enjoying a few days visiting 
with my daughter and husband, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. H. Klette. 

William Gadker, who came to the 
funeral of his sister, visited awhile 
with his old neighbor, Mrs. Caroline 



Armstrong before returning to his 
home in Hollywood, Fla. 

(Delayed from Last Week) 

We regretted to learn of the death 
of Clifford Lipscomb, who had been 
bom and reared in this community. 
He leaves his wife and two daughters, 
Mrs. Helen West and Mrs. Mabel 
Wehrmuth. 

We were glad to have visiting iit 
the neighborhood last week, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. J. Green and children, now 
of New Lenox, 111. They visited in 
the homes of Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Keeney, Miss Helen Richardson. 

We heard of an accident which 
caused Mrs. Cliff Coleman to have 
a broken arm. 

„ George Finnell, Jr., his brother,. 
Ralph, and son, Glenn, attended a 
machinery show in Louisville, recently. 

Mrs. C. S. Rapp and daughter, Mrs. 
Duff, were shopping in Covington, oner 
day recently. 

Carsee Brinkley is feeling better. 

Doctor to portly patient: Follow 
this diet, and in a couple of months 
I want to see three-fourths of you 
back here for a checkup. 




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Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 9 



Frontier Worlds 
A "Dead Duck' 



First, we heard it on a TV news- 
cast last Saturday evening, and then 
read the article in the Sunday En- 
quirer that Fess Parker had abandoned 
the Frontier Worlds project near 
Walton, at the junction of 1-75 and 
1-71. 

Many local peonte have been skep- 
tical from the stprt, and the rest were 
just hopeful that this would come to 
pass. 

This turn of events is typical for 
the Walton area. For 50 years we 
have heard' of this or that that was 
coming to the area, and to date, none 
ever developed. 

C. B. Deters, Northern Kentucky 
realtor, was quoted by the newspaper 
as saying that other interests now hold 
the 800 acres, the identity of whom he 
was not at liberty to disclose. It seems 
they are considering developing an in- 
dustrial park on the site. Deters also 
said he understood there was also 
some effort on the part of Kentucky 
to develop the area as a state pork. 

Parker, it is said, blamed the de- 
velopment of the Taft Broadcasting 
King's Island amusement park near 
Kings Mills, Warren County, Ohio, 
for the cancellation. However, we 
believe that scarce money and high 
interest rates had more to do with it. 
Because, if we remember correctly, the 
Ohio venture was under way when 
Fespar started to buy ground for the 
proposed local park. 

Property owners in the area did 
benefit by selling their farms at a 
high price, and this is good. But on 
the other hand, it caused prices gen- 
erally to go up and we suspect that 
several land owners will have to do a 
heap of farming to get their money 
back on recent purchases. 

Well, so much for Frontier Worlds 
— it did sound good! 

INDEPENDENCE VFD 
AUXILIARY MEETING 

The regular monthly meeting of 
the Ladies Auxiliary of the Indepen- 
dence and Community Volunteer Fire 
Department was held Thursday, Feb. 
25th, at the firehouse with 11 mem- 
bers present. 

Plans are being made for a ham 
social on Sunday, March 28 at 2:00 
p. m., in the firehouse. 

Two new members, Elaine Penick 
and Margaret Smith, were voted into 
the organization. 

Refreshments were served by Jean 
Elbert and Ruth Ann Elbert. 

The next meeting will be held on 
Thursday, March 25th at 8:00 p. m., 
in the firehouse. 

If you have time on your hands 
and live in the Independence com- 
munity and would like to work for a 
good cause, the Fire Department, con- 
tact Dottie Merrill, president, phone 
356-2008, for application blank. 

Walton Lions Sponsor 
A Father-Son Night 

A Father-Son night was sponsored 
recently by the Walton Lions Club, 
and it resulted in one of the largest 
crowds ever. 

Lion Stan Sallee was in charge of 
the program which was presented by 
Kentucky State Trooper, Sgt. Lewis 
Hankins. He gave a fine talk and a 
lot was gained by all who attended. 

Sons attending were: Tim Hicks, 
Jeff Afterkirk, Mark Cook, Gary 
Sallee, Carl Parker, Scott Parker, Chris 
Parker, Mark Parker, Randy Ryan, 
Mark Jones, Ronnie Davis, Ronnie 
Norris, Larry Norris, Danny Glenn, 
Freddie Leicht, Phillip Leicht, Dan 
Harden, Mike Harden, Dennis Davis, 
Caryl Davis, Tony Huth, Daryl Dar- 
lington, Darwin Darlington, and Dar- 
ren Darlington. 

World Day of Prayer 

World Day of Prayer will be held 
on Friday, March 5th at 8:00 p. m., 
in the Walton United Methodist 
Church, Walton. 

The CWF of the Walton Christian 
Church will be in charge of the pro- 
gram, and Rev. Robert Anderson, pas- 
tor of the Madison Avenue Christian 
Church, will deliver the message on 
"New Life Awaits." 

All churches in the community are 
invited. Refreshments will be served 
following the meeting. 

Bad judgment causes, more acci- 
dents than bad luck. 



TO DISCUSS DRUG 
ABUSE AND CRIME 

An illustrated discussion on nar- 
cotics and crime will be presented by 
Sgt. Lewis Hankins, Public Relations" 
Department of the Kentucky State 
Police, at the next meeting of the 
Boone County Republican Club, ac- 
cording to President Don Brown. 

The meeting will be held Thursday 
night, March 11, at 8 o'clock.. Inter- 
ested members of the public are cor- 
dially invited to attend this intensely 
informative talk. 

February Meeting 
Of the Local PTA 

The February Meeting of Walton- 
Verona PTA was held Monday eve- 
ning, February 22, with the president, 
Mrs. Edward Lay, presiding. The de- 
votional period was given by J. B. 
McCubbin, Chairman of the Board of 
Education. The pledge to the Am- 
erican flag was led by those attending. 

The room count was won by Mrs. 
Raymond Roter's second grade room. 

Elementary principal, Ernest Hahn, 
reported that the new copying ma- 
chine had arrived. He expressed ap- 
preciation to the PTA for the purchase 
of same. 

It was voted to purchase books for 
one semester for a 1971 graduate. Ap- 
plication forms may be obtained from 
the principal's office. 

A committee was appointed to se- 
lect a local person to "receive a life- 
time membership in the PTA. This 
honor wll be bestowed at the March 
22 meeting. 

Mrs. George Anderson, program 
chairman, gave a report on some of 
the accomplishments of the Walton- 
Verona PTA during the past years. 

Members then adjourned to view a 
display of art work from the elemen- 
tary and high school students. Law- 
rence McKinney is the instructor. The 
president thanked him for the nice 
display, noting that he always has time 
to cooperate with extra school activi- 
ties. 

Refreshments of cookies and punch 
were served by the hospitality chair- 
man, Mrs. Donald Rice. 

19th ANNIVERSARY OF 
BOONE COUNTY OAR 



Boone County, Chapter, Daughters 
of the American Revolution, celebrat- 
ed its 19th anniversary with a dinner 
at Holiday Inn, Ft. Mitchell, on 
Wednesday, March 3, at 6:30 p. m. 

Mrs. Francis J. Sayre, Regent, pre- 
sided. The chapter was organized on 
March 28, 1952 by Mrs. ROy C. 
Nestor at her home in Florence. 

The program consisted of a talk on 
John Hunt Morgan and the battle of 
Ft. Mitchell. Larry Hanneken and 
Fred Moeller were dressed in Confed- 
erate Uniforms, and their rrurse, Mrs. 
Carol Buechel wore a Civil War 
nurse's uniform. 

The First Kentucky Volunteer In- 
fantry, .of which the above men are 
members, was started as a Civil War 
Roundtable in 1961, and has been 
active in parades, Civil War re-enact- 
ments and centennial celebrations. 

CRUSADE FOR CHRIST 
AND COUNTRY PLANNED 

. Gordon 'Jack' Mohr will be focusing 
the spotlight of Gods' Word on 
Americas problems. 

Bro. Mohr is a dedicated evangelist 
and lecturer on communism, new mor- 
ality and sex education. He has 19 
years experience in these fields. One of 
the most decorated soldiers during the 
Korean war, tried by a communist 
court, sentenced to die before a firing 
squad but miraculously escaped. 

He retired from the army as a Lt. 
Col. in 1964; has spoken in "35 states 
and 3 foreign countries before 490 
audiences in the past two years. 

Pastor Everett Casson invites the 
public to eight great days, March 7-14, 
7:30 nightly, 11:00 a. m. Sundays. 
Come hear this dedicated man give of 
his knowledge and experiences. 

Services will be held at Kenco Bap- 
tist Tabernacle, 5828 Wilson Road, 
V4 mile off Walton-Nicholson Pike 
West of Nicholson. • 





Mrs. Shirley Gilvin 



A Successful Presidency Rgfirr f)|f Will TIlTUd Receives Life Membership 

And Pioneers One 

Walton- Verona 79, Beechwood 72 

Walton-Verona spotted Beechwood 
a 9-point first period lead and then 
roared back to score a 79-72 victory 
at Walton, Tuesday of last week. 

The Beechies were limited to six 
points in the second period and were 
never able to get out in front from 
that period. The victory was the 20th 
in 28 games for the Bearcats. 

Mike Ferguson led the winners witli 
23 points, while Bobby Messmer add- 
ed 16, Ronnie Huffman 14, and Gary 
Ingram 13. Mark Gooch netted 20 
points for Beechwood, and Mark Rob- 
inson had 25. 

The Walton-Verona reserves were 
winners by a 61-44 score. 

Simon Kenton 83, Owen County 71 

Steve Leistner's 28 points sparked 
Simon Kenton's Pioneers to an 83-71 
victory over Owen County, Tuesday of 
last week at Owenton. 

The Pioneers trailed for the first 
half but moved to the front in the 
third period and clinched the game 
with a 22-point final period. 

Mike Perry starred for Owen Coun- 
ty with 30 points, and Steve Miller 
added 15. Rust added 16 for Simon 
Kenton, Haynes 13, and Halderman 
12. 

The Simon Kenton reserves won 
by a score of 45-30. 

Walton-Verona 87, Ludlow 68 

Walton-Verona handed the Ludlow 
Panthers an 87-68 defeat last Thurs- 
day night in a playoff of a game post- 
poned earlier in February because of 
snow. The winning Bearcats had their 
hands full in the first half before scor- 
ing 23 points in the third period to 
clinch the victory. 

Ingram had 26 points for the win- 
ning 'Cats, Huffman 23, Messmer 15, 
and Ferguson 14. Alig was the big 
man for the Panthers as he poured 
30 points through the nets, while 
Lanham added 13. 

Walton-Verona 86, Cov. Latin 66 

Walton-Verona ended any hopes for 
Covington Latin's 20-game winning 
season by downing the Trojans, 86-66, 
last Friday night at Walton. 

The winning Bearcats were hard 
pressed in the first half but pulled 
away in the final two period for an 
easy win. The locals ended the sea- 
son with a 22-8 record. 

Ron Huffman led the winners with 
20 points, while Mike Ferguson, Rick 
Goldsberry and Mike Sargent each 
added 17 points. Jeff Stowers had 25 
for Latin, Caldon _ J2GV and Bogen- 
schutz 13. 

The Walton-Verona reserves were 
winners in the first game, 71-26. 



Mrs. Shirlie Gilvin has had a very 
successful year as President of Piner 
PTA. The membership has increased 
to 100% for each room with a total 
of 561 members. 

Mrs. Dorothy Peeler, magazine chair- 
man reported receiving a certificate 
for having over 25 subscriptions for 
the PTA magazine. 

"The Fall Festival was a success 
and we have all interested parents to 
thank. It takes these parents working 
with their school to make all these 
things successful. We hope everyone 
continues to do such a good job," a 
spokesman stated. 

Wa-Na Club Meeting 

The Wa-Na Woman's Club will 
meet Thursday, March 4, in the home, 
of Mrs. Jack Rouse on South Main- 
Street, Walton, at 8:00 p. m. 

Mrs. Frances Stephens and Mrs. 
Robert Eisenschmidt along with Mr^ 
Rouse are hostesses. 

Emberton Speaks, 
At Lincoln Dinner 

Tom Emberton of Edmonton, Ky., 
contender for the governorship of 
Kentucky on the GOP ticket, was the 
guest speaker at the Boone County 
Republican Club Lincoln Day Dinner, 
Tuesday, February 23, at the Hungry 
Jack Smorgasbord, Florence. In at- 
tendance with him were his wife, 
Julia, and Secretary of State Kenneth 
Harper of Lakeside Park. 

In honoring the nation's Civil War 
President, Emberton pointed out that 
Lincoln faced many difficult prob- 
lems as we are facing today. "The 
problems we see today are jiot insur- 
mountable," he emphasibed. "But a- 
gain it's going to take a rededication 
of our people to overcome them." 

A larger than capacity dinner crowd 
swelled the dining room for the oc- 
caion, one of the best-attended in 
Boone County GOP history. Thedin- 
ner was planned and arranged by Mrs. 
Harry Daugherty, Mrs. John Schram 
and Mrs. R. C. Brakefield. 

The master of ceremonies for the 
affair was Don Brown, Florence, cur- 
rent president of the Republican Club. 



Birthday Dinner Sunday 

A birthday dinner was given on 
Sunday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Eddie Connelly on Bracht-Piner Road 
in honor of the 62nd birthday of Mr. 
Connelly. 

Those enjoying the day with him 
were: Mr. and Mrs. David Mullins 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Con- 
nelly and family, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Dunn, Jr. and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gene Roland and family, Mrs. Audrey 
Leek, Betty and Mike Leek, Miss 
Rita Tinch, Kimberly, Belinda and 
Chandra Kidwell, Mr. and Mrs. Ever- 
ett Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 
Grabow and sons, Miss Mary Ann 
Zimmerman, Mr. and Mrs. Ronnie 
Grout and family, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Long, Miss Emily Henke^ Mrs. Evelyn 
Sparks, Dennis and Donna Sparks, 
and Mrs. Jean King. 

4-H Electric Meeting 

There will be an electric project 
club organized at the home of Mrs. 
John Hetterman on Saturday, March 6 
at 9:30 p. m. 

Please bring $2.25 to order exten- 
sion cords to be made before Rally 
Day, May 1st. 

If you are in the second or third 
electric project, call Mrs. Hetterman, 
485-4314, for the amount of money 
to bring for project. 



Telephone Usage 
Increases In 1970 

The average Cincinnati Bell cus- 
tomer placed more local calls and 
talked "longer in 1970 than ever be- 
fore, President W. J. Whittaker re- 
vealed in the phone company's annual 
report to share owners. 

These changes in calling habits re- 
sulted in an increase in our invest- 
ment in facilities and switching equip- 
ment just to provide for the increased 
usage of the telephone, Mr. Whittaker 
said. 

Demands for telephone service, the 
report stated, were affected by the 
softness of the national economy. Dur- 
ing the year Cincinnati Bell added 
26,291 telephones, compared with 
38,298 additional phones for the pre- 
ceding year. Telephones in service at 
the end of 1970 totaled 872,019. 

Construction expenditures during 
the past year amounted to $45.7 mil- 
lion. This brought the total invest- 
ment for plant at the end of the year 
to $369,821,000. 

Operating revenues reached $113,- 
880,000, up $12.5 million, while op- 
erating expenses climbed nearly $9 
million to $73,666,000. Earnings per 
share amounted to $3.80, up 36 cents 
per share from 1969. 

Sickness In Local School 

There have been quite a few teach- 
ers and pupils absent from the W-V 
school the past week due to colds 
and throat infections. 

Mrs. Pauline Gardner, third grade 
teacher, and Mrs. Vernice Gill, eighth 
grade teacher, had major lurgery last 
week in Lexington hospitals. 



Mrs. Roberta Steinhauser 

Mrs. Roberta Steinhauser, teacher 
for many years at the Piner Elementary 
School, was presented a Life Member- 
ship in the Kentucky Congress PTA. 

She is a very dedicated teacher, has 
been in charge of Music at the Wil- 
mington Baptist Church, presently in 
charge of Music at Piner Baptist 
Church, also has taught music in 
the Kenton County school system. She 
is a faithful leader in the 4- Club at 
Piner. Mrs. Steinhauser has always 
done more than her share of work 
with all the students and has been 
there to give a helping hand to all 
PTA officers and parents. 

The school is proud to have her in 
the community and to have her as 
otae of the teachers. 

Brown Is Candidate 
For Representative 

Donald L. Brown, 1 Yealey Drive, 
Florence, a long-time figure in North- 
em Kentucky politics, has announced 
his intention to run for the Kentucky 
State Legislature on the Republi^n 
ticket in this county. He noted that 
for the first time in history Boone 
County is virtually assured of having 
its own legislator. 

His family is steeped in Boone Co- 
unty tradition. His great-grandparents, 
the Houstons, the Stephensons and 
the Rogers, were all early settlers in 
the county, and his other great-grand- 
parents, the Browns, moved here from 
Owen County. 

Upon returning home from World 
War II, he took up farming near 
Burlington, and married the former 
Frances Ruth Welton, Florence,, in 
1947. They have three childre n. 
Gregg, 20; Eathy, 16, and Todd, 9. 

For the last 11 years he has been 
employed by Budig Trucking Co. He 
is now also associated as a real estate 
salesman with Brophy Real Estate and 
Insurance. He is a member of Local 
100, International Teamsters Union, 
and a member of Greenview Baptist 
Church, Florence. 

He is presently a member of the 
Boone County GOP Executive Com- 
mittee and President of the Boone 
County Republican Club, one of the 
founders of this organization. 

Twenhofel "Sport Night" 

The Twenhofel Junior High PTA 
is planning 'Sport Night' at the school 
March 8, from 7:30 to 9:30. 

Girls, under the direction of Miss 
Linda Biddle, girls gym instructor, 
will play Simon Kenton All Star girls' 
basketball team. 

Mr. Gerry Schweitzer, director of 
the ahtletic department, will provide 
tumbling acts and basketball games 
between 9th graders and teachers and 
7th and 8th graders. 

There will be door prizes, a bake 
sale, home made candy, snacks and 
soft drinks. A program to be enjoyed 
by parents and students. Tickets will 
be available at the door. 

On UC's Dean's List 

Paul E. Dieterlen, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul J. Dieterlen, Route 5, Cov- 
ington, was named to the dean's list 
in his first quarter as a University of 
Cincinnati College of Engineering stu- 
dent with an average of 4.0. 

He was graduated from Simon Ken- 
ton High School in W70. 

"I see by the paper," said a matron 
having her third cup of coffee, "where 
a woman sued a doctor for operating 
on her husband. "That's ridiculous," 
said her girl friend "What was the 
charge?" "Opening her male." 



Studying Northern 
Kentucky Ski Slope 

It is entirely possible Kentucky's 
snow skiiers will not need to drive 
several hours to their favorite slope 
next year for the privilege of enjoying 
the alpine sport. ' 

According to Parks Commissioner S. 
W. Palmer-Ball,, a major ski slope, 
the state's first, may be in operation 
next season in Northern Kentucky. 

Preliminary analysis completed by 
Sno-Engineering, Inc., of Franconia, 
New Hampshire, report two parks, 
Big Bone Lick State Park in Boone 
County and General Butler State 
Park in Carroll County, have sites 
suited for intermediate slopes of mod- 
erate difficulty. 

Big Bone has greater crowd poten- 
tial because of its proximity to the 
markets of Covington, Newport, and 
Cincinnati, but General Butler has 
slightly longer and steeper slopes, the 
report said. 

. Next step toward reality in estab- 
lishing a winter playground in North- 
em Kentucky is a climatological report 
to be furnished by Joel Meyers, a 
specialist in area weather surveys, ty- 
March 31. 

Although snow machines would be 
necessary to operate slopes at either 
proposed location, the engineering 
firm advised Parks officials both real 
snow, and moderately cold temperatur- 
es would be required in addition to 
the artificial surface. 



The Pap Test 

The Pap test is a quick, simple, 
painless test for uterine cancer. The 
American Cancer Society savs this 
early detection technique could help 
save your life. 



RESOLUTIONS BACK 
BURLEY POUNDAGE 

Kentucky's General Assembly has 
gone on record as supporting burley 
aBnhn»ntaflfl a poundage, rather than 
acreage,' basis. 

Resolutions of approval were steer- 
ed through the Senate and House last 
week by Senator Tom Harris and State 
Representative W. J. Louden, Carroll 
County Democrats. 

The resolutions were designed to be 
used this week at a congressionla hear- 
ing in Washington. Copies were sent 
•to the congressional committee on ag- 
riculture and the Kentucky congres- 
sional delegation. 

The Legislature's resolutions were 
identical, and pointed out the annual 
cash income from burley at $300 mil- 
lion to 20,000 Ketucky families an- 
'nually. 



WHITE'S TOWER PTA 

The White's Tower Elementary 
School PTA held its regular monthly 
meeting Thursday, February 18, at 
7:30 p. m., in the school cafeteria, 
with Mrs. Joseph Gadd presiding. 

Donald Johnson of the John Shillito 
Company, showed a film on shop- 
lifting, "The Silent Crime," which 
was followed by a question and ans- 
wer session. 

The newly purchased silver tea ser- 
vice was used to serve the Silver Tea 
as part of the Founders Day observ- 
ance.- Past"presldenty _ were TionoraT 
and presented a gift from the school 
PTA. 

Mrs. Virginia Noem was presented 
a lifetime membership. 

ULH&P GAS REFUNDS 

The Union Light, Heat and Power 
Company is refunding $85,192 to its 
55,900 gas customers in Northern Ky. 

The amount of refund will be de- 
ducted from each customer's bill, and 
will be based on the amount of gas 
each customer uses. For example, a 
residential customer who uses gas for 
home heating will receive about four 
cents per month. Tire refunding will 
be in effect until all of' the $85,192 is 
returned. 

More than $53,000 of the amount 
is a refund ULH&P has received from 
a major gas supplier and is passing 
along to customers. The remainder is 
the result of a rate reduction made 
effective by the Kentucky Public Ser- 
vice Commission for 3Vi months of 
last year. 

Kenton County Booklet 

The advantages of living and work- 
ing in Northern Kentucky is included 
in a booklet being distributed to 1000 
prospective teachers by the Kenton 
County Board of Education. 

The folder, "You'll Like Living at 
the Top of Kentucky," is being used 
by Supt. R. C. Hinsdale and Asst. 
Supt. Donald Davis in making their 
rounds of colleges and universities in- 
terviewing seniors. 

The booklet outlines the housing 
available, the utilities, the academic 
opportunities nearby and the cultural 
institutions. 

While similar selling pieces have 
been published by other school dis- 
tricts, mostly out of state, the Kenton 
County booklet is the first one for 
the local system. 

Stalemate: A husband who forgets 
a wedding anniversary. 



Thursday, March 4, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) 



Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main SL 
Kentucky 41094 - Seeond Class Postage Paid at Walton, 




[ton, 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 

— Assistant Editor 

Society Editor 



Subscription Rate Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inc h. Foreign Rate, 6c Per Line. 



Rev. and Mrs. William C. Johnson 
and Mrs. Walter Sleet of Walton, 
went to Lexington, last week, to at- 
tend the State Pastors' Cottfeseace^ at 
the Shiloh Baptist Church. 

Vernon Ray Chapman of High 
Street, is a patient in St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Covington. 

Chester Armstrong of North Main, 
returned home the past week from 
Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, where he 
underwent surgery. 

Patricia Perkins is a patient in St. 
Elizabeth Hospital. 

Onie Cook and Laura Drury of 
Bright, Ind., were guests of their 
cousin, Ruth Smith, of High Street, 
recently. 'They took Mrs. Smith to 
visit Mrs. Callic Beach, of Mt. Zion, 
mother of Mrs. Drury. 

Henry Sleet visited his aunt, Mrs. 
Laura Rider in a rest home at Cyn- 
thiana, Ky., last Saturday. 



Friends of Mrs. Viola Roberts are 
glad to know that she is improving. 
She is to return to the rest home in 
a short time. 

Mrs. Lil Young of Park Avenue, 
has been ill the past week. 

Sunday callers in the home of Mrs. 
Ruth Smith were Mrs. Carrie Hopper- 
ton, and daughter, Rosella Conley, 
Mr. Cenley and daughter of Goshen, 
Ohio, Aliver Beach of Aurora, Ind., 
and Mr. and Mrs. Howard Vaughn 
and family of Walton. 

Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Russell and 
*Mr. and Mrs. John Gault were enter- 
tained in the home of Mrs. Walter 
Whitson on Sunday. 

Johnny Hetterman of Lexington, 
spent the weekend with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Hetterman, and 
family. 

Mrs. Pearl King is a patient in St. 
Elizabeth Hospital. 



IS 1 



Spring Is Here— [ 

* 

11.6 ACRES — Just right for your country place — i 
Price $8,000.00. 

2 WELL LOCATED building lots. Both lay nicely, ■ 
over one acre each. Price $2,500.00. 

Gayle ■ 

McElroy ■ 
Realty ■ 

33 Alto Vista Drive 

Walton, Kentucky 
Phone: 485-4297 ■ 




FOR HOME MORTGAGE LOAN ADVICE, 
VISIT FIRST FEDERAL 

mi 




l IR5T( EDERAL 

Savinqs^Loan Association 



:. 



OF COVINGTON 
5th Cr Main Streets— Covington, Ky. 

ELSERE, KY. LATONIA, KY 

3715 Dixie Highway 36th & Decoaraej 

DIXIE HIGHWAY— SOUTH OF WALTON 



Sympathy is extended to Don, 
Glenn and Frazier Moses in the death 
of their father, I. J. Moses, j>f Cor- 
inth, Ky. 

Miss Joella Sleet and Mrs. Malcolm 
Simpson attended the Home and Gar- 
den Show at the Convention Center 
in Cincinnati, Sunday afternoon. 

Ruth Smith repeived word last week 
of the serious illness of her cousin, 
Claud Johnson, who formerly lived in 
this area. He would appreciate cards 
addressed to 113 Market St., Vevay, 
Indiana. 

The Happy Helpers Class of the 
Walton Methodist Church will meet 
on Tuesday, March 9, with Mrs. M. 
F. Simpson as hostess. 

Mr. land Mrs. Bruce Wallace enter- 
tained Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lemons 
at the Butler Park Lodge, Sunday. 

Mrs. Jesse Callen, who has been 
on the sick list, is better at this time. 

Valarie Liisby of Warsaw, spent the 
weekend with her grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Melvin Utley, and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donnie Afterkirk of 
Richmond, Ky., were weekend guests 
of his mother, Mrs. Frances After- 
kirk, and son, Jeff. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Stahl of Cov- 
ington, were Sunday evening dinner 
guests of her mother, Mrs. Goldie 
Wood, and Tommy Black. 

Mrs. William Mastin spent Mon- 
day with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Grastie Whitton, of Monterey. 

Lewis Ryle, who has been a patient 
at Woodspoint, has returned to his 
home on Ryle Road. 

Mrs. Charles Holder of Chambers 
Avenue, is a patient in St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. 

Notes Of Servicemen 

James N. Cook, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Leonard Cook, Jr., Route 1, 
Morning View, recently was promoted 
to Army Captain while serving with 
Headquarters Company, Committee 
Group, U. S. Army Training Center, 
Ft. Campbell, Ky. 

He entered the Army in March of 
1968 and -was last stationed in Viet- 
nam. He is a* 1965 graduate of Simon 
Kenton High School, Independence. 
His wife, Kimberly, is with him at Ft. 
Campbell. 

Sgt. Michael Helmer, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed Helmer, of Piner, was 
discharged from the Army, Feb. 5th, 
after 21 months of service. He spent 
12 months in Vietnam, and was sta- 
tioned in South Carolina before his 
discharge. 

Helmer and his wife, the former 
Linda King of Walton, and their 
daughter are residing in Independence. 

Dennis Poteet, son of Mrs. Sue 
Baker of Alta Vista, Walton, has been 
promoted to Specialist Five while serv- 
ing' in Vietnam. 

LOSE DRIVER LICENSES 

Listed below are those who lost 
their drivers license for the week end- 
ing February 19th, as released by the 
Department of Public Safety to the 
Traffic Safety Coordinating Commit- 
tee, Frankfort: 

KENTON COUNTY: Lloyd Early, 
20, of Retrte 1, Box 97, Morning 
View, six months; Edman Croy, 26, 
of 639 Maple, Elsmere, until July 7, 
1971; Thomas Metz, 28 o,f 3802 
Turkey Foot Road, Erlanger, six 
months; James Alford, 40, of 41 Lex- 
ington Drive, Erlanger, until July 27, 
1971. 

BOONE COUNTY: Donald Blades, 
28, of 7307 Dixie Highway, ^Florence, 
90 days; James Portwood, 25, Route 
2, Walton, six months; Joseph Harry 
Martini, 19, of 83 High St., Walton 
until July 12, 1971; Richard Stevens, 
48, of 23 Woodland Ave., Florence, 
until Aug. 6, 1971. 





COMPLETE DRUG 
STORE SERVICE! . 

Ask Your DOCTOR to Coll 356-3931 or 356-3941— Save Time— We Can 
Have Your Medication Ready for You — 

Nie's Pharmacy 

LLL Highway between Independence and Nicholson 



VERONA 

Flonnie F.drington, Reporter 

Mrs. John Lindsey and little son, 
of near Carrollton, spent last Friday 
night and Saturday with her mother, 
Mrs. Lillie Cooke. 

Mrs. Ethel" Pennington had a freak 
car accident one afternoon last week. 
Mr. Pennington parked the car on 
the side of the road and went look- 
ing for a cow he had missing. While 
he was away some man came along 
and ran into the car and knocked it 
about 1 5 feet. Mrs. Pennington's neck 
was hurt and she Was taken to the 
hospital, but it was not serious, we 
are glad to report. <i • 

Mrs. Iris Hughes spent Monday 
with her mother, Mrs. Flonnie Edring- 
ton. 

Mrs. Josephine Robinson and Tim 
and Lisa spent last Sunday with her 
mother, Mrs. Tilda Hocker of Berea, 
Ky. 

James Coyle and Harry Rich left 
last week for Arkansas to visit Mr. 
Coyle's daughter for a week. 

The sick folk from Verona, who 
are in the hospitals, are doing fine. 
We wish for them a speedy recovery. 

WA-NA CLUB MEETS 

The Walton Wa-Na Club met on 
February 4th in the home of Mrs. 
Preston Art. 

The meeting was on Ecology and 
consisted of a panel and group dis- 
cussion. Panel members were Evelyn 
\Hance, Helen McElroy and Libby 
Rouse. 

Delicious refreshments were served 
by the hostess to the following: Mes- 
dames Gayle McElroy, Daniel Hance, 
Jack Norris, Robert Slayback, George 
Black, David Ashley, Luther Stephens, 
Gerald Ellott, and Asa M. Rouse. 



Beech grove Homemakers 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Beechgfove Homemakers was held on 
Feb. 18th n the home of Mrs. James 
McHale, with Mrs. Raymond Mc- 
Hale as co-hostess. 

Members enjoyed the lesson on 
Annual Flowers. Members are to 
keep saving Betty Crocker coupons 
for the kidney machine until July 31. 

Those present were: Mesdames Ed- 
ward Andress, Raymond Dickson, Tom 
Ellis, Wilson Hall, Virgil Kelly, Roy 
Kumler, William Letcher, James Mc- 
Hale, Raymond McHale, Faye Powers, 
William Scheper, Tony Schneider, 



Vern Stephens, Tony Sterbling, Ernest 
Olson, and Lloyd Spegal. 
. The next meeting will be held on 
March 18th in the home of Mrs. 
Vern Stephens with Mrs. Edward 
Andress as co-hostess. 

Spring Auction at Union 

A Spring Auction will be held on 
Saturday, March 27 at 10:00 a. m., at 
the firehouse, sponsored by the Union 
Fire Department and Ladies Auxiliary. 

Donations are needed and you may 
call George or Bonnie at 384-3174 for 
pickup. Col. Frank Worthington will 
be the auctioneer. 



TRULY HOMELIKE 



A home away from home, a place where the 
family and friends may be together in an 
atmosphere of warmth and friendliness . . . 
this is 

Chambers & Grubbs Funeral Homes 



Walton, Ky. 
485-4352 



Independence, Ky. 
356-2673 



—SERVING ALL FAITHS— 



JUDY DRIVE-IN 
THEATRE 

Taft Highway - Dry Ridge, Ky 

Show Starts at 7:15 



FRI. & SAT. 



- MARCH 5-6 

[MiwuHMniManraniiuMfiKnaRi 
AMIKEIYICHOLSFILM 
AlANARKIN 



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Alan Arkin, Richard Benjamin 
and Paula Prentiss 

— plus — 

"TELL ME THAT 
YOU LOVE ME, 
JUN1E MOON" 

Liza Minnelli & Ken Howard 
CARTOON 



COL. KENNER'S 
Appliance Co. 

5980 Taylor Mill Road - 356-5440 



SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF WASHERS, DRYERS, 
REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERSfcjTC. 

(Over 20 Years In the Service Business) 



BankAmericard and Master Charge Honored 



WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF ADMIRAL, 
MAYTAG fir COLEMAN GAS & OIL STOVES! 



Open Monday thru Wednesday, 10 a. m. to 6 p. m 

Thursday anoUFriday, 10 a. m. untit 9 p. m 

Saturday, 10 a. m. until 5 p. m. 




SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 1971 



10:00 A. M. 



At Ro-Mary Farm (formerly the Bedinger Farm) on Richwood Road, 3 Miles South- 
west of 1-75 and 5 Miles North of Walton, Ky., Boone County. Take Richwood Exit 
West and follow arrows— 

90 HEAD OF HOLSTEIN COWS, HEIFERS, STEERS, AND BULLS- 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lawson and Mary Fanning, owners and operators of this dairy 
herd, are going out of the dairy business due to health and shortage of labor. 
48 head of Holstein milk cows, some in high production now, some with calves by 
side, and some heavy springers. There are 5 with calves by side, 3 heavy springers, 
7 dry cows, 2 cows giving 60 lbs. per day, 1 cow giving 55 lbs. per day, 1 cow giving' 
50 lbs. per day, 3 cows giving 45 lbs. per day, 1 1 cows giving 40 lbs. per day, 3 cows 
giving 35 lbs. per day, 11 cows giving 30 lbs. per day; 16 yearling heifers; 24 heifers 
and steers (6 months and un der). AH TB and Bangs tested. - 



Also 1962 Farmall 230 tractor with front mount cultivators, hydraulic fast hitch. 

LUNCH SERVED 

Sale Conducted By 

COL CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

REALTORS-AUCTIONEERS-APPRAISORS 
4 East Southern Avenue, Covington, Ky. - Main Street, WiHiamstown, Ky. 

431-4222 ANYTIME 



CLERK: Ron Goodridge 



CASHIER: Julia Blair 



If you are planning an auction, call the auctioneer direct, with no middle man. Call Col. Cecfl Wayman make 
no mistake, the number is 431-4222— if calling from out of phone range, ask operator for ENTERPRISE 4222 
—no charge. E. S. I would like to list your farm for sale. 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



BEAVER LICK 

Sandy Stephenson spent the week- 
end at home from Morehead. 

Mrs. Sue Hodges Murphy and hus- 
band have bought a home in Coving- 
ton and are having some dork done on 
it, so they can get moved in this 
■weekend. j 

Mrs. Grace Sparks was taken to Jjie 
"hospital in a serious condition. We 
all wish heT a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Omer Kite is doing very nicely 



Thursday, March 4, 1971 






Candid Weddings 

Color & Block & White 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

Stanley Kacaba 

124 North Main, tyolton 
485-4046 



now and seems to be somewhat im- 
proved, but Mr. Kite is beginning to 
get restless having to stay housed up 
so long, now that the sun has start- 
ed to shine, and the old catfish are 
starting to bite. So get ready, Mr. 
Kite, to start pulling 'em in. 

The sun has begun to get a little 
more pep in some of the farmers a- 
round Beaver and vicinity — at least 
they're seen out occasionally. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

The family of Lon Wilson wishes 
to express its thanks and gratitude to 
all those friends and neighbors who 
have shown kindness and thoughtful- 
ness during its time of sorrow. The 
cards, food, flowers, and prayers were 
all greatly appreciated. Special thanks 
go to Dr. J. M. Huey for his care, to 
the staff at Woodspoint, /to the Rev. 
Noble Lucas, and to the Hamilton 
Funeral Home. All the many kind 
thoughts and deeds of relatives, fri- 
ends and neighbors will long be re- 
membered, r 

THE FAMILY OF 
lt-9* LON WILSON 



20 Years Ago . 



Is Your Subscription Paid? 



DO YOU KNOW ... 

Independence Cemetery Grave Space May Be 
Purchased As Low fs $110.00 Per Grave? 

INDEPENDENCE CEMETERY 

NINA CRUTCHER, Bank of Independence 
TOM WAINSCOTT, Riley's Market 



COMPLETE INCOME TAX SERVICE 
Harold R. Weaver & Associate 

Farmer, Business, Professional, and Personal. 
Phone for Appointment or Stop In. '. 



Box 3, Big Bone Road 
Union, Kentucky 41091 



Phone 
384-3330 



Don't Be Late — 27 Years Experience! 



Thursday, March 1, 1951 

WALTON— 

Bom to Mr. and Mrs. Myrix J. 
Crouch, Jr., on Sunday, February 18, 
at St. Elizabeth Hospital, a daughter, 
Glenda Sue. The little lady weighed 
10 pounds, 8 ounces. 

Mrs. Russell Yealey had a surprise 
dinner for her mother, Mrs. Pearl 
Bedinger, Sunday. Invited guests were 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Hudson, Mrs. 
Sallie Hughes and Mrs. Lula Hudson. 

Mrs. Lula Hudson had as dinner 
guests last Friday evening, Mrs. John 
Feagan and Mrs. Carrie Rouse. 

Mr. and Mrs, Eugene Sizemore had 
as Sunday guests, Mr. and Mrs. Has- 
sell Harrod and family of Frankfort. 

Miss Nina Joyce Easton of George- 
town College, and Mr. and Mrs. Dean 
Kephart of Blanchester, Ohio, were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Was- 
son over the weekend. 

Raymond Massie and family, and 
grandmother, Mrs. Smith, visited Mrs. 
Maggie. Chapman and daughter, Mrs. 
James Allphin, Sunday. 

R. L. Stephenson and family of 
Crescent Springs, were the Sunday 
guests of J. W. Stephenson, Walton. 

INDEPENDENCE— 

Approximately 50 Kenton County 
youth will be inducted into service in 
March., 

Willard Shropshire's Simon Kenton 
High School Pioneers handed the sec- 
ond place Newport Public Wildcats 
their fourth loss in the NKAC by a 
68-47 score. Coppage led Simon Ken- 
ton with 23 points. 
BEAVER LICK— 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Eckerle and 
children of Ohio, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Ross Kite and daughter of Richwood, 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Rex Kite and 
mother, Mrs. Hood, Sunday. 

Mrs. Everett Mastin spent Thurs- 
day night with relatives in Covington 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Moore and 
son moved from the Green farm to a 



farm they recently purhased from Lon 
Wilson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Sparks and 
family spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Clem Readnour and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Arnold spent 
Sunday with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. James W. Arnold, of Mt. Sterl- 
ing. 

VERONA— 

The WMS met at the chuch on 
Wednesday, February 14. There were 
14 members present — every good con- 
sidering the icy roads. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Kemper called 
on her mother recently. 

Mrs. Boyd Webster had as guests 
recently, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Thie, 
Mrs. James Miller and son, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Doggett and son. 

The Light Bearers Sunday School 
class met at the church with 12 mem- 
bers present. 

Master Freddie Hudson Hamilton 
and mother arrived home rom St. 
Elizabeth Hospital last week and are 
doing nicely at their home. 

Luther Risner, who has been sick, 
is slowly improving. 



BIRTHS 



A son, weighing 10 pounds, was 
born to Gene and Lois McElroy on 
Sunday, February 28, at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Covington. The McElroys 
have a daughter, Melinda. 



COUNTY 
AGENT'S 
Vi ACRE 

— by— 
JOE CLAXON 




B. C. & D. 

CONTRACTING, INC. 
Streets, Sewer, Water, and Grading 






FREE ESTIMATES 
PHONE 356-5695 



6776 Taylor Mill Road 
Independence, Ky. 41051 




Foy - Johnston 

DIRECT FACTORY PAINT DEALER 

Wallpaper In Stock 
Wall-Tex Art Supplies 
Picture Frames ... 

LUCAS PAINT & HARDWARE 



264 Main Street 
Park In Rear 



Florence, Kentucky 
Phone 371-7921 



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These plus benefits add up 
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Call or write us today for 
full facts. 

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93 North Main Street 

WALTON, KY. 

485-7102 

y 

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GENERAL 
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the general savings end teen essoclmtfon, inc. 

HXTH A MADISON, COVINGTON, Kf. t 29L72I9 • 4501 MOf HWf H fUMMf, Kf H MMMI 





The U. S. crop that uses more 
farm acreage than any other is neither 
wheat, corn nor soybeans— it's hay. 

In terms of farm value, hay also 
ranks high on the list— about $3 bil- 
lion worth in 1969 and second only 
to corn. 

Harvested area in 1969 came to 
about 62 million acres. Corn, with 
next largest area, had 55 million acres. 
Total hay production, 127 million 
tons, was mainly dried alfalfa, clover, 
timothy, or mixtures of same. This 
also included 8 million tons of wild 
hay, including prairie, marsh and salt 
grasses. 

Around a fifth of the annual hay 
crop is sold. The balance is fed to 
livestock on the producing farm. 

Nearly all the hay is dried and baled 
in the field — over 90 percent— accord- 
ing to a recent study on hay liar- 
vesting practices. Thirty years ago, 
only 1 5 percent of the crop, was baled 
in the, field where grown. 

The greater multi-purpose haying 
equipment has resulted in substantial 
labor savings to hay producers in all 
parts of the country. Still, there are 
wide variations between states in man- 
hours spent in harvesting the yearly 
hay crop. 

Have 5oil tested for, increased pro* 
duction. Bring your soil samples to the 
Extention Office in Burlington. 

Willing Workers Meet 

The regular meeting of the Willing 
Workejs Class of the Walton Christ- 
ian Church met February 28 in Fel- 
lowhip Hall. 

After a delightful pot-luck supper, 
the regular business meeting was held, 
conducted by Mrs. Walter Whitson. 

Rev. Arthur Russell led an interest- 
ing devotional. He began by asking 
the meaning of the expression, 
"What's the Good' Word?" Several 
expressed an opinion, but it was agreed 
by all that it depended upon what 
the situation was. He then quoted 
from Proverbs 12:25 "Heaviness in 
the heart of man maketh it glad." 
"Since most that we hear today is 
bad," he said, "it's good to hear the 
opposite." He quoted from John 16: 
33, in which peace in the world and 
heart of man is stressed. 

Those present were: Mrs. Lillian 
Acrce, Miss Rachel Acree, Mrs. Nell 
Campbell, Mrs. John Gault, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. W. Rouse, Rev and Mrs 



A. J. Russell, Miss Mary West, Mrs. 
Walter Whitson, and a guest, Mrs. 
Nancy Lawson. 



MEN NEEDED 

In this area to train as 

LIVESTOCK 
BUYERS 

LEARN TO BUY CATTLE; 
HOGS AND SHEEP 

at Ml* barns, feed lots and 
ranch**. W* prefer to train 
man 21 to 55 with livestock ex- 
perience. For local Interview. 
writ* age, phone, address ana 
background to: 

NATIONAL MEAT PACKERS 
TRAINING 

236 Ivist Town, Dept. V-112 

Columbus, Ohio 43215 



W£ou>£$r/im 

pouvraivr 



er koh 



RREHlSTtfRTC 





cetfrt/Ries or pRe/tismtttc swpms piled 
wsr 500 rerr dbbp in gome arcas 

OTCU/NA. THE SOFT POROt/S rogx pdzmep 
FROM TH/S DVSr IS CALLED 'LOESS" BT 

geologist*, in tne w/reo srares, we 
Bivrr row* Arrows or me M/ssissirrr 

VAUSY Afie lOSSS... /cVCXMA&r 
fBOM AN&£Nr DUST/ 



Boone 4-H Club 
Equestrians Meet 

The Boone County 4-H Equestrians 
held their February 10th meeting at 
the residence of Curt England of 
Florence. There were 22 members, 2 
leaders and a guest present. The club 
is happy to have fqur new members 
who joined just recently. They are 
Randy, Karen and Kim Louden and 
CjTarlene Hempfling. 

The main business of Hie meeting 
was preparing for the style show and 
horse clinic planned for March 14 at 
the Burlington School at 1:00 p. m. 
English, Walking Horse, Western, 
Hunt, and Roadster clothing will be 
modeled. Demonstrations and talks 
will also be given on these five di- 
visions on the correct equipment for 
these type horses. Used riding clothes 



and equipment will also be sold at • 
this time. Any 4-H members are wel- 
come to bring these articles to be 
sold. There will also be prizes. An 
exciting program has been planned, 
and the public is urged to attend. 

A skating party is planned for Mar. 
23, in conjunction with two other 4-H 
horse clubs. The Equestrians also plan 
to visit a Quarter Horse farm some 
time this spring, although no definite 
plans have been set. 

The next meeting of the Boone Co- 
unty Equestrians will be held March 
10, at the home of Jo Ann Goebel, 
Tanner's Lane, Florence. 

"They say," -said the man to his 
wife, "that in time married couples 
grow to look alike, but I haven't seen 
much improvement in you yet." 



We've Roped In A Collection « 

BOONE SADDLE SHOP 

"THE- COMPLETE RIDING APPAREL AND TACK SHOP" 

Over 50 Saddles On Display 

S-A-L-E 

Apparel * Shirts * Blouses 
Jackets * Suits * Pants * Jeans 

FREE — Fringe Purse with 
$15.00 Purchase! 

71 MODEL LANE TRAILERS 
HORSES BOARDED 

8179 DIXIE HIGHWAY (N ^ R ^L K J: &) 

BANKAMERICARD - MASTER CHARGE 

Phone 371-1412 





200-ACRE FARM— Gallatin County, State Route 16; 
excellent laying land, good fence, 1.83 tobacco 
base; pasture 100 head cattle— $49,000.00. Will 
accept trade-in. 

85!/2 ACRES — Verona, Ryle Road; modern farm house, 
all land is clean, 1-acre tobacco base. Good buy at 
$28,000.00. 

COLONIAL 2-story house, Eads Road, Verona; needs 
restoring, 2 acres land— $14,500.00. 

WE HAVE several acreage tracts for sale. Listings 
needed in Boone and Gallatin County areas. Free 
appraisal. 

TOM HODGE REALTY 

VERONA, KY. PHONE 485-7362 



... INCOME TAX SERVICE 

Folks, it's that time again. We are pleased to re- 
port that we plan to offer income tax repojt- 
again this year. 

Mr. Lindley, who handled the service last year, is 
planning to return this season. He has just completed 
a refresher course with H. R. Block, as well as attend- 
ed a course at U. K., where 1971 changes were taught. 
He states there are quite a few changes. 

Our office will open Monday, January 25th, and Mr. 
Lindley plans to be available each Monday and Thurs- 
day, 9:00 a. m. to 4:00 p. m. Mr. Lindley says he will 
be looking forward to working with you. 

DONT DELAY— BE EARLY— BE SAFE! 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

U. S. Highway 25 - 1 Mile South of Walton 
"hone 356-2172 



Thursday, March 4/1971 



Walton M/ertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



3 Only! Sofa Bed Couches covered in 
heavy duty nylon covers, regular 
119.95 this week only $77.00 ea. 

1 0nly! Early American 2-Piece 
Living Room Suite, Maple Wood 
Trim on Arms, regular 369.95 
value. now only $244.00 

fOnly! Broyhill Extra Length Couch 
Special this week only $244.00 



Fwniture Bargains 

1 0nly Bassett 3-Piece Modern Bedroom Suite, 

J regular 269.95 Special Only $199.95 

3 Piece Modern Living Room Suite, reg. 349.95 
value 1 only at this price only $266.00 

Benton - Bonar 



V 



65 N. Main St., Walton, Ky. Phone 485-4495 



2-Piece Modem Living Room Suite 
In Heavy Duly Naughyde Cover, 
now only $119.95 

Modern End and Coffee Table Sets, 
regular 59.95 each, 3-Piece 
Set, now only $100.00 

1 0nly! Maple Bunk Bed Set $44.95 

2 Only! 6-Piece Dinette Sets, 
your choice only $88.00 ea. 

r 



Staffordsburg 

Mrs. J. A. Keeney, Reporter 

The WSCS met at the church on 
Wednesday evening with Mrs. Ronald 
Losey ~aftd Mrs. Taylor as hostesses. 
Mrs. J. Shaw called the meeting to 
order. The program was on United 
Nations. Mrs. Shaw gave a talk from 
the program book, assisted by Miss 
Helen Richardson. We adjourned to 
the dining room where plans had been 

made to honor two of the members, 
Mrs. Charles Finnell and Mrs. Don 
Keeney. Among those present were: 
Mrs. Lyda Rees, Mrs. D. Ballinger, 
Mrs. C. Losey, Mrs. J. Shaw and 
Carol, Rev. and Mrs. Pepoon, Lola 
and Seth, Mrs. D. Parsons, Mrs. C. 
Ramsburg, Mrs. A. Taylor, Mrs. F. 
Keeney, Mrs. G. Finnell, Jr., Mrs. C. 
Finnell, Mrs. D. Keeney, who receiv- 
ed nice gifts, and the hostess. The 
next meeting will be at the church 
with Mrs. D". Parsons in charge. 



We congratulate Miss Debora De- 
Groot in achieving the Dean's List at 
Northern Kentucky College. 

Mrs. Maud Arends is again visiting 
Carsee Brinkley. We hope she will 
like us enough to stay for quite a 
while. 

Rev. Pepoon has planned a guest 
speaker for the Sunday evening ser- 
vice each Sunday during Lent. For 
March 7 it will be Rev. Jasper Han- 
non. We hope good numbers find it 
possible to be present. 

The MYF had an interesting pro- 
gram on the 21st at the evening hour. 

The Kenton County Garden Club 
met Thursday evening, Feb.. 25, at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Gouge i Walnut Dr., Independence. 

Miss Taylor opened the meeting by 
reading two poem prayers. Mrs. Keen- 
ney read the minutes, and Mrs. Hall 
gave the treasurer's report. Some 
cards were sold. 

The meeting of the Garden Club of 
Kentucky at the Phoenix Hotel, Lex- 




ington, was announced for April 13- 
1 5. Hope some can go. 

Mrs. Lucille Hall gave the spiritual 
guidance, reading from hte Gospel of 
John and some appropriate poems. 

We were grieved to hear how the 



Triangle at Nicholson is again dese- 
crated by the ULH&P, who placed a 
pole in the area. 

Mrs. Leontine Stephens, program 
director, had arranged for Edwin Da- 
mon to show slides taken on several 
trips to the West, which was most 
interesting. 

Mrs. Gouge served delicious refresh- 
ments to Mr. and Mrs. C. Ballinger, 
Mrs. Wm. Guttridge, Mrs. W. Hall, 
Miss Margaret Stephens, Mrs. Leon- 
tine Stephens, Miss Elma Taylor, Mrs. 
J. Herron, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Da- 
mon, Mr. Gouge, and Mrs. Keeney. 

The March meeting will be held 
with Miss Elsie Hiteman, March 26. 

An elderly man complained that he 
couldn't hear his telephone ring, and 
a louder bell was installed for a week- 
end trial. "Can you hear the phone 
ring now?" the man was asked at the ' 
end of the week. "No, I can't," he 
said. "But don't take it Out. Every 
time the phone rings the dog howls 
and I can hear him." 



Mr. Merchant: 



Here are TEN Solid Facts You Should Consider 
In Planning Your Advertising: 

1 — This newspaper is an advertising medium that is WANTED — it is sought after and paid for, and the 
advertising in it is not an intruder in the home. 

t 

2— Nearly all of this newspaper's circulation is CONCENTRATED in this trading area. 

3— The newspaper provides PENETRATION in the primary market by reaching virtually every family or 
customer in that market. 



4 — People read newspaper ads when they are ready to make a decision and to act— WHEN THEY'RE 
READY TO BUY. 

5— The newspaper is convenient; it may be consulted at a time most CONVENIENT to every member of 
the family. 

6— People LIKE TO READ NEWSPAPER ADVERTISEMENTS— surveys show that 85 percent of the people 
want their newspaper to contain advertising. 

7— Every issue of every newspaper contains INFORMATION AND PICTURES of interest to every mem- 
ber of the family. 

8 — Newspaper reading is a habit and a part of people's routine. 

9— The printed word is MORE RELIABLE THAN the spoken word and it cannot be refuted because it is 
easily available for re-checking. More accurate information is obtained by reading than by listening. 



TO— Tire n ewspape r is i d e a l f or co m pa rison — it ems in 
in other newspaper ads. 



may -be easily compared with items 



THE MOST EFFECTIVE and MOST ECONOMICAL 

WAY TO PROMOTE BUSINESS IS THROUGH 

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING! 

WALTON ADVERTISER 



WALTON, KENTUCKY- 



TELEPHONE 485-4962 



— 



RATES OF WALTON ADVERTISER 



-60c per column inch 



Local Display 

Foreign Display (6c per line) 84c per column inch 

Mats or Plates — Deadline Monday Noon 



Classified Ads, Cards of Thanks. 



_50c minimum 



(2c per word if in excess of 25 words) — Payable In 
Advance. No Phone Calls. Deadline Tuesday, 10 a. m. 



Legal Advertising. 



-$1 00 per column inch 



-OFFICE HOURS— 

Monday-Friday 8 a. m. to 12 noon, 12:30 to 4:30 

Social News Deadline 12:00 Noon, Monday 

Phone 485-4967 



A Texan visited Niagara Falls with 
a friend from New York. "I'll bet you 
don't have anything like this in Tex- 
as," said the New Yorker. "Nope," 
said the Texan, "but we have plumb- 
ers who could fix it." 

"I heard you slap your boy friend 
when he brought you home last night. 
What happened?" the mother asked. 
"I was just checking to see if he was 
dead." 



Most northerners defend their cli- 
mate by saying that they like the 
change of seasons — and at this time of 
the year, the sooner it changes, the 
better they are going to like it. 

In my time, a man was judged by 
now many membership cards for speak- 
easy night clubs he carried. Today's 
cool cat is known by the number of 
credit cards he has in his wallet. 




- 



Y 



Wplton Advertiser, Wolton, Kentucky 




Thursday, March 4, 1971 



Classified Advertising Rate: Mini- 
<num charge of 50c for 25 words or 
leas-over 25 words, 2 cents per 
•word— CASH IN ADVANCE! 



for Sale— 



POR SALE-' 57 Chevrolet, red with 
white top, 283 V-8, standard shift; 
70 Mercury Cyclone GT, orange 
with black interior, 351 automatic 
on floor, mag wheels, and wide 
ovals. Call 485-9448 between 8:00 
a. m. and 5:00 p. m. ]t-9* 

FOR SALE-1952 Ford tractor, set 
of plows, and r6tary tiller, all for 
$1,000.00; also 1966 Dodge V 2 -ton 
pickup truck, first class condition, 
$1,100.00. Call anytime, 356-2288. 

2t-8* 



FOR SALE— Trumpet, Conn, with 
case, $100.00. Call 356-2215. Betty 
Gauntt, 608 Bowman Road, Inde- 
pendence, Ky. lt-8* 



FOR SALE— 5-floor chicken brooder, 
electric, metal, on wheels, 250 baby 
chicks, or 50 until frying size, good 
as new, $50.00, or will trade up or 
down; going out of business; boot 
jack, baby buggy. W. F. Baker, 
Route 1, Warsaw, Ky. 41095. Call 
567-2177. 3t-8* 



NORTHERN KENTUCKY TYPE- 
WRITER SALES & SERVICE— 
Conveniently located in Elsmere, 
Ky., is now open to serve all bus- 
inesses and homes in Northern 
Kntucky with factory-trained service- 
men on all makes of typewriters, 
adding machines, cashxa registers, 
and calculators. Prompt service at 
reasonable prices. We also carry 
ribbons, adding machine paper, and 
rental machines. Jot free estimate, 
visit our store and service depart- 
ment at 4217 Dixie Highway, or 
call for free pick-up and delivery, 
341-1525. tf-8c 

FOR SALE— Roto bin, chaih saw, 3- 
piece sectional couch, glass show 
case, 3 tons of stoker coal. Phone 
356-7750. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE— 27 feeder pigs, 8 weeks 
old. 643-5510. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— 1969 Plymouth Road- 
runner, very clean and in excellent 
condition, has 3 years of 20,000 
miles warranty left. 356-9033. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE! — Seven springer Holstein 
heifers, dehorned, vaccinated. Ottis 
Readnour, 485-4504 or 485-4732. 

tf-2c 



section %m? 



FOR SALE— Charolais bull. Marvin 
Mullins, 356-9816. 2t-9* 

WEDDING CAKES and Cakes for 
other special occasions; also sewing 
of all kinds. Mrs. Clarence Rouse, 
249-A Hempflmg Road," Atwood, 
Ky. tf-3c 

FOR SALE— 1965 Chevrolet convert- 
ible, V-8, automatic, power steering 
and brakes, 57,000 miles, very good 
condition. Call 485-4823. 2t-9* 

■ 

FOR SALE— 1966 N7000 Ford truck, 
diesel engine, air brakes, LWB. 
Groger Truck Line, 485-4574 or 
542-4007. tf-49c 



FOR SALE— Vi Swiss and Yi Charo- 
lais, weigh approximately 1600 lbs. 
Call after 4:00, 359-4493. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE— Laying hens. Contact 
Esther Jackson, 356-2538. ■ 2t-8c 



If ridicule were really an effective 
weapon, the makers of women's pants 
suits would starve to death. 



NOTICE- 



Wanfed- 



SMALL, gentle horse for sale, cheap. 
L. S. Blakey, 356-9984. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28e 



FOR, SALE— 4 bedroom home, all- 
electric heat, IV2 baths, 1 acre lot, 
2 driveways, 24x30 patio, $20,000. 

I Day 823-5241, night 823-6361. lt-9c 



FOR SALE— Sawmill, good running 
condition, priced cheap. Herbert 
Antrobus, Falmouth, Ky., Route 5, 
Highway 22. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE— 400-450 bales first cut- 

ting clover hay; same amount of 

wheat hay; 90c a bale. 356-6218. 

tf-8c 

FOR SALE or TRADE— 1965 Chev- 
rolet station wagon, V-8, •automatic, 
$595.00. Call 356-2001. lt-9* 

FOR SALE— 1970 JacobserTl2 h p. 
tractor with 48-inch mower. Phone 
356-9720 after 7 p.m. 2t-8c 

FOR SALE — 3 rooms of furniture, as 
group or by piece. Call after 6:00 
p. m., 456-9032. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE — New Idea manure spread- 
er, corn elevator .with electric motor, 
4 new tires H78xl5, door 6' 4"x3\ 
also straw. 365-6822. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— 2 acres, 5-room frame 
house, Wilson Road, Independence, 
$10,000. Rubbe Realty Company. 
356-9250. tf-6c 



FOR SALE 

196J^Dodge truck, IVi-ton, with 
good flat and sides, excellent con- 
dition, radio, mirrors, heater, low 
mileage, one owner. 

LEON B. HALL 
Phone 485-4087 - 485-4823 



FOR SALE— Feeder pigs, Duroc and 
Hampshire stock, 35 to 90 pounds. 
Gordon Moore, Old Lexington Pike, 
Walton, Ky. Call 493-5391. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— 40x80 building with full 
basement, and parking lot. Phone, 
day 823-5241, night 823-6361. lt-9c 

FOR SALE— 1962 Plymouth 2-door, 
standard transmission, 6-cylinder, in 
good condition. 643-5510. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— International Low Boy 
tractor with 48-inch mower and a 
grass sweeper, also dump wagon, 
$1,900.00. Phone, day 823-5241, 
night 823-6361. lt-9c 

FOR SALE— Oak dining room table 
with 4 chairs, excellent condition, 
$45.00. 356-6534. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— Corn, $1.80 per bushel. 
Pickups only. Paul Chapman, Glen- 
coe, Ky. 643-2921. 4t-9* 

FOR SALE— Horse, 6 yean old, walk, 
canter and rack, gentle; 4V$-inch 
cut-back saddle and bridle, new. 
Ernest W. Collins, 824-6391. 2t-8* 

FOR SALE— 8 Holstein stalker calves; 
Hereford cow and calf; Guernsey 
cow, will be fresh soon. Phone 
359-4583. lt-9* 

FOR SALE— Bay colt, 6 months old. 

356-7374. 2t-9* 

SEWING MACHINE— Brand new 
1971 model, does all fancy work, 
even write names, simply tum .level 
and sew. Price reduced to $28.00 
cash price because of small stratches 
in shipping, or terms available. Call 
689-7936. 2t-9c 



FOR SALE— 1961 Chevrolet Impala, 
V-8, good motor. Homer Anderson, 
Green Road, Walton, Ky. lt-9* 

FOR SALE— Block and stoker coal, 
seed and feed of all kinds, at the 
Readnour Coal & Feed in Walton, 
Ky. Day phone, 485-4504; night 
phone, 485-4732. tf-28c 

TIRED OF BROKEN GLASS? For 
safety sake, replace it with clear 
plastic. 485-4217. tf-42c 

VACUUM CLEANER— Paint dam- 
aged vacuum cleaners still in factory 
cartons, complete with all 7 clean- 
ing tools. Reduced to $16.50 cash 
price or terms available. Telephone 
689-7936. 2t-9c 

OVERBAY'S ANTIQUES— Collector 
items, bought and sold. Marble-top 
dressers, ice cream chairs and tables, 
round-top oak tables. Va, Mile- South 
of Verona, on Highway 16. Phone 
485-4049. 5t-7* 



FOR SALE — Three registered Angus 
bulls. John J. Kelly, Menefee Road, 
Crittenden, Ky. 824-4432. 2t-9* 



RED BRAND FENCE— Premium 
baler twine, small hardware, feed, 
fertilizer, groceries, tobacco crop 
supplies, agricultural lime, and grass 
seed. Water hauled. Telephone 
356-6060. W. E: Schulker General 
Store, U. S. 25, 3 miles South of 
Walton, Ky. tf-lOc 

FOR SALE— 1963 International 1600 
series cab and chassis, V-8 engine, 
5-speed transmission, 9.00x20 tires, 
will take 18-ft body. Groger Truck 
Line, 485-4574 or 542-4007, tf-46c 

FOR SALE — 1,000-1,500 bales hay, 
consisting of alfalfa, clover and fes- 
cue. 824-6388. 2t-8* 

REDUCE safe and fast with GoBese 
Tablets and E-Vap "water pills/' 
Boone County Drugs. 10t-50* 

FOR SALE — By owner. 5-room house 
and bath, pantry, full basement, out- 
side garage, built-in kitchen, storm 
windows and doors, oil furnace, large 
garden; lot 100x180 feet; Walton- 
Nicholson Road. Call Alma Atha, 
485-4390. 2t-9* 

FOR SALE — American wire fence, 
steel posts, barb wire. Readnour 
Coal and Feed, Walton. Phone 
485-4504. tf-42c 

Classified Ads Get Results! 



WANTED— A 1961 or 1962 Chev- 
rolet; will do repair work on it my- 
self. Call 485-4379, lt-9* 

WANTED— To rent a crop of to- 

hafceo in or close to Walton area. 

-«-^rIave own equipment. Jim Houston. 

493-5592. 3t-8c 

WANTED — Mature person to babysit 
with 2-year-old, light housekeeping, 
Walton area; must have references; 
own transportation or live-in. Call 
485-7369 after 6 p. m. 3t-9* 

PART TIME HELP WANTED— 
Apply in person between 8:00 and 
5:00. Independence Cemetery, 5368 
Madison Pike, Independence. 2t-8c 

WANTED— Would like to rent a 
country home with garden; couple. 
Phone 491-5303. ■ 2t-9* 

WANTED TO BUY-Marble-top fur- 
niture, good used furniture, cut 
glass, china and bric-a-brac. ' Good 
prices paid. Union, Ky. Telephone 
384-3455. tf-lOc 

WANTED — Carpenter and tree trim- 
mer. See Rev. Wm. C. Johnson, 
Church Street, Walton, or call 
485-4847. 3t-9* 

WILL DO ODD JOBS— Carpenter 
work, paneling, painting, light haul- 
ing, basement and yard cleaning. 
356-2550. 2t-8* 

WANTED TO BUY-Brass bed, high 
back wooden bed, round glass china 
closet, desk, round table, old toys, 
dishes, chairs, other antiques. Call 
371-6460. lOt-S* 

SEMI DRIVERS (Experience not 
necessary) — Can eam $4.50 per hour 
after short training for local and over- 
the-road hauling. For application, 
write Nation Wide Semi Division, 
171 New Circle Road, N. E., Lex- 
ington, Ky. 40505, or call 606-299- 
6912. 2t-8c 



WOULD THE PERSON who brought 
glass bowl of food to the home of 
'rs. Gerald Roland, please call 
^85-4409, and get dish. lt-9c 



NOTICE— Auto Insurance Cancelled 
or Refused? We refuse no one 16 
to 76. Easy monthly payment plan. 
HERB RALSTON, 341-6221. tf-lc 



Services — 



For Rent- 



FOR RENT — Two bedroom mobile 
home, semi-furnished; adults; pre- 
fered, rural setting; water and elec- 
tric furnished; $25.00 a week. Call 
485-4422. 2t-8c 



FOR RENT — Two bedroom unfurn- 
ished apartment, all utilities, carpet, 
drapes, appliances, $110.00 month. 
Deposit required. No children. Call 
485-7396. tf-9c 



LOST- 



LOST — Female Collie, 6 months old, 
brown ind white with black mixed 
in the brown; answers to Smokv. 
Reward. 493-5273. lt-9* 



-^CHARGfUlS— 

If You Like Charolais, Visit the 
LAZY J FARM, FISKBURG, KY. 

J. B. Spegal & Son 

Phone 356-7537 



FOR SALE 

1965 Fury Sports Hl^lymouth, 
bucket seats, console on floor, real 
nice, 7 wheels and tires. 

LEON B. HALL * 
Phone 485-4087 - 485-4823 



^. FOR SALE . . . 

16 acres of land, 2.5 acres woods, 
city water and natural gas, abutting 
land on two sides. 

Phone 485-4087 



— : WANTED :— 

Cash for Any Kind of RearEstafe, 
Regardless of Price or Condition. 

Rel S. (Buck) Wayman 

356-5068 




But... You can talk to us about 

a personal loan to clean 

them up in a hurry! 

Fast, confidential 

service — bank rate, 

"budgeted repayments. 




Dixie State Bank 



Save by Mail! 



Walton, Ky 

Phone 485-4121 




Interest Checks Mailed Semi-Annually 



7 



Member F. D. I. C. 
Accounts Insured to $20,000.00 



>&Qf* 



NORMA'S BEAUTY SALON— 7252 
Walton - Nicholson Road, Indepen- 
dence, Ky., introduces Miss Carol 
Jenkins, additional hair sylist. Two 
operators now on duty to serve you. 
Open Tuesday-Saturday, 9 a. m. to 
7 p. m. 'Call 356-7420. 2t-8* 

ELECTRIC SEWER CLEANING— 
Cisterns and septic tanks cleaned. 
Pre-fab concrete cisterns. J. F. 
Lucas Sanitation Company. Phone 
356-2315. tf-5c 

WALTON TV SALES & SERVICE 
— Servicing all makes, color special- 
ists; radios and stereos. Used TV's, 
perfect condition, guaranteed 30 
days. 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. 
Phone 485-7616. tf-3c 

CHAIN SAW sharpening at Kelly 
Hardware, 356-7750. 2t-9* 

AMA LYNN BEAUTY SHOP— Cor 
Road and Jimae Avenue. Complete 
beauty care. 12:00 to 8:00 p. m., 
Tuesday through Friday. Telephone 
356-5600. tf-38c 

JIM'S BARBER SHOP — 335 West 
Southern, Latonia. Two chair shop. 
First chair, Jim Coldiron; 2nd chair, 
Vic Rosenstiel. Latest hair cuts and 
styles. 4t-5* 

COMMERCIAL BACK HOE— Cis- 
tems, septic tanks, drain fields, and 
general work. Lunsford Trucking. 
356-7527. tf-5c 

AUTO & TRUCK INSURANCE— 
Now written to everyone, if driv- 
ing record is good; also full line 
of fire and wind, farm liability, 
farm owners, home owners, and 
Blue Cross insurance. Specials 
on life and polio policies in our 
big Southern Farm Bureau Life 
Co. John Crigler, agent, Bur- 
lington, Ky. 586-6942. tflOc 

ELOISE BEAUTY SALON— 125 S. 
Main St., Walton. Permanents a 
specialty. Hair shaping, tinting, and 
styling. Closed on Tuesday. For 
appointment, call 485-7203. tf-33c 



ARTIFICIAL BREEDING— Call Ben 
A. Riley, 384-3244. Ask for a 
superior bull. tf 29c 

JACK'S BARBER SHOP — Walton. 
Open Monday and Friday, 8:00 to 
8:00; Tuesday, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday, 8:00 to 6:00. Closed Thurs- 
day. Two full time barbers on duty 
Saturday. tf-lc 



LINDA'S BEAUTY SALON— Grade 
"A" Salon. Located across from 
Verona Bank, Verona, Ky. Open 
Tuesday thru Saturday. Telephone 
4S$-5166. Owner Operator, Linda 
Rosenstiel Burgess; Vickie Logsdon 
Rosenstiel, part-time hairdresser. 

tf-42c 

PLUMBING SERVICES — New 
work, remodeling, and repairs. 
Electric sewer cleaning, 24-hour 
service. All work guaranteed. 
Free estimates. Call Bob White 
plum bing, 356-7274. tf-34c 

COLES BEAUTY SHOP — Across 
from Benton-Bonar. Realistic per- 
manents, $5.00, $7.50 and $10.00. 
Lillian Coles, formerly of Vogue in 
Covington. 493-5197. tf3-3c 

SEPTIC TANKS— Drain fields and 
sewer lines installed; cleaned and re- 
paired. CISTERNS— Precast; sales 
and installaton. Don Myers, Inc. 
Master plumber No. 2940. Phone 
356-2798. tf-33c 

DIXON'S HIGH FASHION HAIR 
STYLING— 18 South Main Street, 
Walton, Ky. Open Tuesday through 
Saturday. Wigs, wiglets, falls styled. 
Complete line of Koscot Kosmetics. 
Phone 485-7220 or 824-4735. Ann 
Dixon, manager; operators, Irene, 
Dena and Shirley. tf-41c 

FASHIONETTE BEAUTY SALON, 
Verona, Ky. Discriminating wo- 
men who want the best profes- 
sional care available, personal 
styling, and quality products us- 
ed, come to the "Fashionette." 
Wigs, falls and wiglets, sold and 
serviced. Phone 485-4429. tf-2c 

LOANS to full or part time FARM- 
ERS — For all your needs. Office 
hours, Monday thru Friday, 8:00 to 
4:00 p. m. FIRST KENTUCKY 
PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOC- 
IATION, 30 Needmore St., Walton, 
Ky. Phone 485-4288. See M. Carl 
Walters or Wilfred J. Scott. tf-lOc 

YOUR NEAREST SEWING CEN- 
TER— In Florence, Ky. New ma- 
chines, $59.95; used machines at 
low as $19.95. A complete line of 
yard goods. Complete stock of all 
size Simplicity patterns. We make 
covered buttons, belts, buckles, in- 
itials. Complete stock of sewing 
notions. Scissors sharpened, pinking 
shears and electric scissors sharpen- 
ed. New hose, filters, brushes, bags, 
and parts to fit Electrolux and all 
other makes vacuum cleaners, tank, 
canister and uprights. Authorized 
sales, service and parts for Hoover 
vacuum cleaners. We stock parts 
and repairs for all makes of sewing 
machines and vacuum cleaners, for- 
eign or American makes. Everything 
for your sewing needs. Cavanaugh 
Sewing Center, 12 Girard Street, 
Florence, Ky. 16 years in the same 
location. Phone 371-9264. Open 
9:00 to 8:00. tf-29c 



TRAVELERS INSURANCE CO.- 
Life, Health, Hospitalization, Ac 
cidentr R eti r e m e nt, Aut o , 
Owners Fire Policy & Business 
Frank Butler, 485-4217. tfl-Oc 



— PLUMBING- 
WATER HEATERS 
BATH REPLACEMENTS 
REMODELING 

:!*?ir 2^-0553^356:9574 



INTERIOR PAINTING 

EXPERTLY DONE 
—FREE ESTIMATES- 
RALPH FOLTZ, 356-5987 



—INCOME TAX— 

No Waiting. Call for Free Esti- 
mate and Appointment. Reason- 
able rates. 14 Years Experience. 

356-9690 

After 5:00 Week Davs 



INCOME TAX 

ROGER SAYLOR 

Crittenden, Ky. 

824-4212 



MOVING! 

NELSON MARKESBERY 
MOVING COMPANY 

—371-8111 — 

Local - Long Distance - Since 1916 



ORDER NOW!! 



: 



and save money on that new Mobile Home you are thinking about 
before the rush is on and the prices go up. 



Stop «nd see our new lines, from $4,790.00, 60 feet, 3 bedrooms, 
$300.00 down; also 68 feet, 5 bedrooms, $6,79p.OO. 



BIG BONE MOBILE HOME PARK & SALES 

Route 338, Off 42 Next to Big Bone Lick State Park 



384-3258 - 384-3259 



Thursday, March 4, 1971 



W«»ton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



WALTON UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Guest speaker on Sunday during 
the morning worship service was Ken- 
neth Thomas of Florence, representing 
GideonV>*Jnternational. He related 
some of the work carried on by the 
organization in the 86 countries, stat- 
ing that fhe Bible was being distribut- 
ed in 33 languages to schools, hos- 
pitals and penal institutions. 

Several members of the church 
have attended' district workshops re- 
cently relative to their council work. 
They were Rev. Robert Yates, James 
Lawrence, Mrs. Charles Ammer, Mrs. 



Albert Norris, and Mr. and Mis. J. 

J. Bamett. 

The WSCS will host the ^orld 
Day of Prayer program, Friday eve- 
ning at the church. 

The chairman of education has set 
a meeting for 7:00 p. m., Friday, to 
meet with Sunday School leaders to 
discuss present and future needs. A 
goal of 200 has been set for Easter 
Sunday. 

The great sin of pornography is its 
disregard for the dignity and unique 
worth of each person. 

A man's life is 20 years of having 
his mother ask him where he is go- 
ing, 40 years of having his wife ask 
the same question and, at the end, 
having the mourners wondering too. 



Darlington Excavating 



Walton— 485-4229 



Melbourne— 635-2095 







Pre-Cast Cisterns, Bogging, Grubbing, Pond 
Work, Yard Grading, Backhoe Work, Base- 
ments Dug, Septic Tanks, Leaching Lines. FREE ESTIMATES 




Don't let Tight Money keep you from completing 
plans for your new home. We can help you suc- 
cessfully complete the mortgage details with the 
advice of our specialists. They can also advise 
you of low interest rates with payments tailored " 
to your budget and the advantage of low closing 
costs. It's just one more benefit of doing business 
with . . . 

R0SEDALE FEDERAL 

SAVINGS i, LOAN ASSOCIATION 

"IN THE HEART t)F LATONIA" 

CAROLINE AND SOUTHERN AVENUE 

COVINGTON, KY. PHONE 431-7723 




I 



SATURDAY, MARCH 13th - 10:00 A. M. 

4026 Turkey Foot Road, 3 Miles East of Florence, Ky., 
at the Farm of Barbara Schaefer. Due to the death 
ofJieiJmsJiajioV-Mtt. Schaefer is quitting The farm 
business. 

1953 Super "A" Farmall tractor, cultivators, sickle bar 
mower, drag disk rubber tired (tractor hitch), manure 
spreader, hay rake, saw mangle, rototiller, 4 # Woods 
rotary tractor mower, 2-wheel trailer, Homelite chain 
saw, Black b Decker power saw, 3 /s electric drill, feed 
grinder, scissor jack, chains, horse-drawn cultivators, 
steel beam plow, scraper, horse-drawn corn drill, scald- 
ing pan, electric water pump, rotary lawn mower, har- 
ness, collars, wheelbarrow, rolls wire, pulleys, hay fork, 
vise, lantern, single trees, rolls galvanized tin, miscel- 
laneous boxes of bolts and nuts, hand tools, pile of 
lumber, 3 pieces 2" crock pipe, milk cart, hot bed 
sash, electric grinder, old ice box, odd lengths of pipe, 
drums. 

Some Antiques: Odds and ends, old crocks and jugs, 
Mason jars, flat iron, churn, lard press, oval iron ket- 
tle, meat grinder, pressure cooker, piano stool, tilt- 
back chair, wing-back leather chair, mantle clock, 
antique dresser, some dishes. 

1963 2-door Chevrolet auto, stick, 60,000 miles. 

—LUNCH SERVED— 

Sale Conducted By 

COL CECIL WAYMAN & ASSOCIATES 

REALTORS-AUCTIONEERS-APPRAISORS 

4 East Southern Avenue Covington, Ky. 

Main Street Williamstown, Ky. 

PHONE 431-4222 ANYTIME 

AUCTIONEERS: Col. Cecil Wayman and Rel C. Wayman 

CLERK Ron Goodridge CASHIER: Julia Blair 

If you arc planning an auction, call the auctioneer direct, with no middle 
man. Call Col. Cecil Wayman, make no mistake, the number 431-4222 
— if calling from out of phone range, ask operator for ENTERPRISE 
4222 — no charge. P. S. I would like to Mist your farm for sale. 




BY LAWRENCE W. ALTHOUSEV 



TO BE A NEIGHBOR 

Lesson for March 7, 1971 



J 




Background Scriptwrt: Mark 12:28-34; 

Luk* 10:25-37. 
Devotional Reading: 1 John 4:11-21 

A family in our church was on 
their way by automobile to Flor- 
ida. On a major highway in North 
Carolina their car broke down, 
stranding them "in the middle of 
nowhere." 
The husBand attempted to find 
~[ what was wrong, 
J but without avail. 
Cars whizzed by 
on either side and, 
although it was 
| obvious that the 
family was irTdis- 
■ tress, no one stop- 
; ped or even slow- 
: ed down. After a 

considerable peri- 
Rev. Althouse od of time had 

elapsed, a car slowed down and 
then stopped. Inside were two 
youths, long-haired and bearded! 
Could they be of help, they 
wanted to know? 

Although this had hardly been 
the source of help the family had 
expected (and although they may 
have been just a bit apprehensive 
at the "hippie" appearance of 
these two young men), they ex- 
plained their plight and accepted 
the youth's offer to tow them to 
the nearest town and repair gar- 
age. 

Who is my neighbor? 

This family was deeply im- 
pressed by this incident because 
they received help in time of 
need from two persons whom or- 
dinarily they would not have 
thought of as the "neighborly 
type." This is the same factor 
which we find in Jesus' parable 
of "the Good Samaritan." What 
made that story so remarkable to 
his listeners is that "good" and 
"Samaritan" were two words no 
Jew would have thought of put- 
ting together. As you are prob- 
ably aware,' there was a deep, 
long-standing animosity between 
the Jews and the Samaritans and 
the latter were regarded almost 
as "untouchables." Jesus could 
not have picked a more despised 
person to serve as his»illustratipn 
of the true neighbor. 

The story comes into being be- 
cause a lawyer (actually a scribe 
or specialist in the religious law; 
a theologian) asked a philosophi- 
cal question: "And who is my 
neighbor?" What are the limits 
of this love I am supposed to 
bestow upon others? The Phari- 
sees, it is said, believed that the 
obligation of loving one's neigh- 
bor went no further than one's 
fellow Pharisees. Others believed 
that neighborliness was intended 
only for fellow Jews. 

It appears that the man wanted 
to engage Jesus in a theological 
debate. Jesus, however, makes it 
that he too is concerned 
about theory and not enough 
about deeds. The Jews assumed 
that their teachings were theo- 
logically or doctrinally correct. 
The Samaritans, by comparison, 
were people who the Jews held 
to be theologically incorrect. Yet 
Jesus shows in his story that what 
is really important is not a man's 
religious theories or doctrines, 
but his actions. 

"Good Guys" and "Bad Guys" 

Compare the three people in 
the story. Two of these are re- 
ligious professionals, the ones 
who would be expected to do the 
"right" thing. The other, a Sa- 
maritan, not only was not a pro- 
fessional but, as a Samaritan, a 
"wrong" believer. Yet, he did the 
loving thing, while the other two 
refused to get involved. The mor- 
al is clear: the loving heretic is 
more pleasing to God than the un- 
loving person who is doctrinally 
or theologically sound. It is what 
we do, not what we say we be- 
lieve that is of greatest impor- 
tance. 

Secondly, Jesus is saying that 
any man, whether he be sinner or 
Samaritan, who needs our help is 
our neighbor. In other words, 
there are no limits to this love 
that God calls from us, there is v 
no one to be excluded, no matter 
how unworthy they may seem 

Jesus finishes this story with 
a twist. He indicates that the 
real question is not "Who is my 
neighbor?", but . . . "To whom am 
I called to be a neighbor?" 



LOOK 

tNTHE 

WANT 
ADS 



NEW BANKLICK 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

We want to* express our thanks for 
all of you who. have mailed or broughfX 
in the General Mills coupons for a 
kidney machine for little Tommy 
Davis of San Jose, California. If they 
keep coming in at the rate they have 
since the article appeared in the Wal- 
ton Advertiser last week, it wouldn't 
take long to reach the goal of 550,000 
coupons. If you have not as yet sent 
in yours, but are deciding on which, 
silverware or a kidney machine, just 
remember your child might be next. 
Send or bring any General Mills cou- 
pons to the New Banklick Baptist 
Church, 21 5 Banklick Road, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094. 

The Youth Choir of our church 
has changed practice night to Tuesday, 
7:30-8:30 p. m. If you are between 
the ages of 13 and 20 and desire to 
sing with youth your own age, why 
not come out and join the group this 
next Tuedsay night. Mrs. Lois Rein- 
hart is in charge of this group with 
the able assistance of Diane Schadler 
and Ron Wells. Many plans are under 
way for some travel spots this summer. 
This will be leading up to a nice trip 
as far South as Florida; and who knows 
where else in the near future if all 
plans materialize. To make them work 
will depend upon the full cooperation 
of our teenagers who are willing to 
sing for the Lord. 

The Sunday School Attendance 
Contest is well underway with tho 
first month almost completed. Here 
is the way the contest looks at the 
moment: 



that the size of the department is not 
the important issue but the highest 
percentage of attendance of the de- 
partment. Thus as we can readily see 
the Children's department leads by 
two weeks already and growing strong- 
er each week. ,So, who will receive 
the beautiful attendance banner for the 
first quarter of 1971? The race is 
young but like the Tortoise and the 
Hare the race is not over until some- 
one reaches the finish line. Let us 
start moving out adult department and 
not go to sleep like the Hare. 

Mr, Ray Mercer of the Youth de- 
partment announces an inner-depart- 
ment contest between his class groups 
of Juniors, Intermediates and Young 
People classes; which includes a special 
award for the boys and girls. He has 
two banners which will go to one of 
the boys' classes and one of the girls' 
classes having the best attendance 
record during the quarter, starting on 
April 4th. 

We do want to recognize the Pri- 
mary I Class of Mrs. Gilberta Kid- 
well who has held an overall grade 
during the month of February of 80%. 
This is an excellent grade due to the 
bad weather we had during those Sun- 
days. Congratulations Primary I Class, 
and to your teacher, Mrs. Kidwell. 



The pastor of New Banklick Baptist 
Church invites anyone who is looking 
for a church home to attend our Sun- 
day School and preaching services and 
give us a try. We do not claim to be 
the perfect church; but we do try to 
serve the Perfect Saviour! See you in 
Church School? 

Two of a women's neighbors were 
discussing the home permanent she'd 
rather ineptly given herself. "What 
do you think of it?" asked one. "It 
looks," replied the other, "like her 
parole came through just as the switch 
was pulled." 



SEPTIC TANKS 

Installation & Repair 

Precast Citterns and 

Backhoe Work. 

356-5804 



Week 
1st 
2nd 
3rd 



Adult 
29.0% 
37.5% 
62.1% 



Youth 
34% 
52% 
70% 



Child 
34% 
54% 

80% * 



It is very important to keep in mind 



TRI-C0UNTY PLUMBING COMPANY 

DIXIE HIGHWAY - CRITTENDEN, KY. 

"Serving Northern Kentucky" 

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL 
REMODELING & REPAIR 

Trenching & Installation of Gas & Water Service 

824 6665 or 356-7477 



I 9 !«■■ *" 




If we could build a fence around the world, would we respect 
our limitations and live happily with one another? Would we stop 
wars? Probably not! 

You can fence in physical objects but not the minds and hearts 
of mankind. 

Nor can we be forced to live In peace. Peace comes through 
practicing love, faith and tolerance — an understanding of God and 
His Church. Then, remember World Day of Prayer. Determine not 
to build a fence around yourself, or around anyone else. Instead, 
enlarge your horizons through the common voice of prayer. 



What better place to start than in the Church? 



Copyright 1971 Kelitar Advertising Service, Inc., Strisburg, Virgin!* 



Scripture* selected by the American Bible Society 



Sunday Monday 



Tuesday Wednesday 
Psalms 
15:12-17 20:24-31 16:1-11 



Johrr John John 

14:1-6 



Thursday 
Psalms 
22:1-3 



Friday 

Acts 

24:10-15* 



Saturday 
Romans 
15:4-13 




The Following Business Concerns Sponsor This Feature: 



ALYS LUSBY BEAUTY SALON 

Phone 485-4800 North Main St., Walton 

BANK OF INDEPENDENCE 

BRANCH OF PEOPLES-LIBERTY 

BARTH MOTORS 

Phone 485-4898 Walton, Kentucky 

BENTON-BONAR DEPT. STORE 

Phone 485-4495 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE COUNTY FARM SUPPLY 

Phone 356-2172 Walton, Kentucky 

BOONE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 371-8836 or 371-9055 

BRAKEFIELD DRUG STORE 

Phone 485-4303 Walton, Kentucky 

BUTLER'S FARM EQUIPMENT 

Phone 356-3081 Nicholson, Kentucky 

DIXIE STATE BANK 

Phone 485-4121 Walton, Kentucky 



HALL ELEC & APPL. SERVICE 

Phone 4854087 Walton, Kentucky 

MOTCH^JEWELERS 

613 Madison Avenue Covington, Kentucky 

READNOUR COAL & FEED 

Phone 4854504 Walton, Kentucky 

JOS. J. HOB AN INSURANCE AGENCY 

ROBERTS INSURANCE AGENCY 
Phone 485-4149 Walton, Kentucky 

RYAN HDW. & IMPLEMENT CO. 

"Ab" Ryan 485-4161 Walton, Ky. 

ST. CLAIR SERVICE STATION 

Texaco Dealer .485-9111 Walton, Ky. 

WALTON ADVERTISER 

Phone 4854962 "Your Local Newspaper" 

WALTON HDW. & DRY GOODS 

Phone 4854000 CUM Ryan, Prop. 

WALTON LUMBER COMPANY 

Phone 4R5-4163 Walton, Kentucky 






Wolton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



-ia- 



Thursday, March 4, 1971 



BEHIND THE SCENES 



-- Canking 

i'JL 




In January, 1782, 
the first bank char- 
tered by Congress 
opened for business 
n Philadelphia. It's 
total capital was 
$400,000 and more 
than half of this 
amount was sub- 
scribed by the gov- 
ernment. 



Today, Americans make 
90% of all payments by 
check and the volume is 
steadily increasing by about 
10% a year. Next year, it's 
estimated that 18 billion 
checks will be written with 
a face value of about 6 
trillion dollars. 





called upon to handle 
huge transactions and ' 
. large amounts of paper 
iwork. To ease their 
load, many are using 
such aids as IBM's 
error-free Magnetic 
Tape "Selectric" Type- 
writer to automatically 
produce credit letters, 
trust agreements and 
internal procedure 
manuals. y 



UNION 



The wedding of Judy Sigmon and 
Wayne Ginn was Friday evening at 
7:30. Bro. Robt. Ginn officiated. A 
reception followed. We wish them a 
long and happy life together. 

We were sorry to hear of the death 
of Margaret Smith of Beaver Lick. 
Our sympathy to the family. 

Mrs. Mable Beil spent one day this 
week with her father, Joe Wilson, at 
the Baptist Home in Newport, and 
found him doing nicely. 

The Big Bone quartet from the 
Baptist Church attended the Area 
Youth meeting at Pleasant View Bap- 
tist Church on Thursday and Saturday 
nights. Several from the church also 
went, and on Sunday afternoon a 
group from the church also attended. 
Bro. Joe Henry Beal brought the ser- 
mon on Thursday night and of course 
the quartet sang each time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rawlings of 
'Florence, were Sunday dinner guests 



of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Beil. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Beil and 
daughter and Kenny Jones called on 
Joe Henry Beil and wife of Florence 
on Friday evening. 

Emma Jane Ryle called on Mrs. 
Russell Yealey and Mrs. Mable Beil, 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Turner, Sr. 
and daughter, Shawn, were visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Everson, and 
family of Newport, Tuesday. 

Paul Slover has been taken to the 
hospital for tests and x-rays. 

Mrs. Marlene Howell and Mrs. 
Pauline Kirby attended a dinner and 
training session of the RECC at 
Nicholson, Tuesday. 

Dale Turner, Gary Turner, Joe 
Parsons, Lee Trapp and Danny Aylor 
attended the Farm Machinery Show 
in Louisville, Wednesday. 

Mrs. Eunice Brucker and Carl Hill 
were dinner guest of the O. L. Blacks 
and Emma Jane Ryle, Saturday. They 
are from Falmouth. 





PINER CLEVER CLOVERS 

The last meeting of the Piner 
Clever Glbvers was held at the Piner- 
Fiskburg Firehouse with Judy Magee 
as hostess. 

Andrea Ballard, president, called the 
meeting to order. Pledges were led 
by Judy Bray. Two songs were sung, 
"America," and "Happy Birthday," 
dedicated to Mike Daniels. 

The roll call was given and mem- 
bers answered with something per- 
taining to Valentine's Day. Members 
present were Rhonda LaFoliette, Deb- 
bie Wolfe, Cheri Smith, Dexter La- 
Foliette, Andrea Ballard, Judy Bray, 
Mike Daniels, Kenny Cook, Betty 
Cook, Joe Scott, and Judy Mgaee. 

Three leaers were also present: Mrs. 
LaFoliette, Mrs. Bray and Mrs. Bal- 
lard. 

Cherie Smith was congratulated for 
winning Princess in the Valentine Day 
skating party at Lloyd's Rink. 

Rhonda LaFoliette gave a report on 
the trip to the Holiday On Ice show. 
A money project was th nediscussed. 

The next meeting of the Piner 
Clever Clovers will be held at the 
home of Cherie Smith. — Reporter 

4-H CLUB MEETINGS 

There were two meetings held last 
month. The first one was held on 
February 4, at Kathy and David Jack- 
son's house, and the second meeting 
was held February 11 at Ralph Col- 
lins' house. 

The meeting was called to order 
by the president, Chris Sipple, and 
Kathy Jackson led the pledges. The 
secretary, Path* Mullins, read the re- 
port of the secretary and treasurer, and 
it was approved. 

The variety show was the main top- 
ic of both meetings and it was de- 
cided upon. The variety show will 
be March 5 and 12. 

The events the month were as 
follows: February 18, Senior Achieve- 
ment, 6:30 p. m.; February 20, Foods 
Training, 1:30 to 3:30 p. m.; Febru- 
ary 23, Electric Training, 7:00 p. m. 
The foods and electric training will be 
held at the Owen RECC Building. 

The leader and members present 
were: Mrs. Glenda Jackson, leader;" 
Mike Sipple, Kathy and David Jack- 
son, Ralph Mollins, Chris Sipple, Pat- 
ti and Pam Mullins. 

The March meeting will be held at 
the home of Chris and Mike Sipple. 
All members are urged to attend.— 
Reporter * 

BIT 'N' SPUR CLUB 

The Bit and Spur 4-H Club will 
hold their next meeting in the home 
of Dick Ockerman, March 5th at 7:30 
p. m. Demonstrations will be given 
by> Beth Koshin and Elaine Campbell. 

Anyone interested in Joining please 
come" 1 to this meeting. — Reporter 



What They Wore 



TME RAINCOAT 

tfoPAY RAINCOATS ARE FASHION 
COATS IN THEIR OWN RIGHT BUT 
IN EARLIER TIMES FASHION WAS 
OFTEN SACRIFICED FOR FUNCTION. 



lay PHYLLIS JOYCE 



Dn \&K) HEAW WOOLEN 
GARMENTS KEPT OUT THE 
RAIN BUT WORE OUT THE 
WEARER WHO HAP TO 
DRAG THEM AROUND. 





WE YEARS- LATER A 
DEVELOPMENT FAR 
AHEAP OF ITS TIME 
OCCURRED - 

WATERPROOF CAPES 

THAT LOOKED LIKE 

SILK COULD BE 

ROLLED AND 

CARRIED IN A 

COAT POCKET. 



Today... when, 

bu/in& womens 

or children's 

apparel look 

for this la3el" 

thesvmbolof 

decency fair 

labor standards and 

ihe American way of life. 




Tjffcl947THE 

trenchcoat, 

adapted from 
the military, 

WAS THE 
FASHIONABLE 
WAy TO WARP 
OFF THE RAIN. 




Pedestrian Safety 

With back-to-school days 
here again, remind children of 
these simple pedestrian rules: 
always stand on the curb while 
waiting to cross, walk only with 
the signal light or at the direc- 
tion of a police officer or school 
crossing guard, look both ways 
and watch for turning cars, 
walk fast but don't run, do not 
loiter in the middle of the street, 
and where there is no sidewalk 
-walk on the left side facing 
oncoming traffic. 




TZhc Sportsman's Comet 

t by Clark Webster, Remington Wild Life Expert 

STALKING PEER 



TEL-STAR 4-H CLUB 

Tel-Star Teen 4-H Club meeting 
was held at the home of Regina 
Wayman on February 18, 1971. 

Meeting was called to order by 
President Kim Works. Pledges were 
led by Jan Lewin. The Secretary was 
absent, minutes were read by Leader. 

Old business discussed included the 
officers' training, sheets will be handed 
out. The Bake Sale had to be can- 
celled due to bad weather so it was 
held February 20th at Ft. Mitchell 
shopping center. The Jet Set 4-H 
Club helped. The money will go for 
the three delegates going to Wash- 
ington, D. C, April 11, for Older 
Youth 4-H Conference. They are John 
Richardson, Melissa Lachmann from 
Jet Set and Cheryl Lewin from Tel- 
Star 4-H Clubs. It twill cost $150.00 
to send each delegate, so if any other 
clubs or business organizations would 
like to donate something, the dele- 
gates will be appreciative. They will 
be happy to give you a report when 
they return. 

Congratulations to Kim Works on 
winning Junior Division Achievement 
Records Books in Foods and Garden. 
Cheryl Lewin was runner-up in the 
Queen Valentine Skating Party, 

The Variety Show is March 5th. 

New business included talking about 
Foods Training session; Rally Day 
training session at 7:00 p. m. on 
April 1st at Courthouse; April 17th is 
Rally Day. 

Next meeting is to be at Donna 
and Marsha Rhodes home. 

Punch and cookies were served by 
the hostess following the adjournment. 
— Glen Webster, Reporter. 

JET SET 4-H CLUB 

Jet Set Club 4-H'ers have received 
many honors in the past few months. 
Three members completed project 
books which went to Area. These 
were Mike Ponzer, woodworking and 
lawn improvement; John Richardson, 
home furnishings and lawn improve- 
ment, and Chela Richardson, achieve-*- 
ment and junior leaderhip. Chela's 
books were chosen to compete at the 
State level. 

Another honor for Chela was being 
chosen as one of the top ten in the 
State in the 4-H Award of Excellence 
program. This is sponsored by The 
Courier-Journal and Louisville Times. 
She will receive a $100 savings bond 
for this honor. 

At the February 4-H skating party, 
Joyce Ponzer, another member, was 
selected 4-H Valentine Queen. 

Two members of the club are plan- 
ning to attend the Kentucky 4-H old- 
er Youth Conference in Washington, 
D. C.", in April. They are Melissa 
Lachmann and John Richardson. The 
club is currently raising money to help 
send them. — Reporter 





TH£ R6LATNELV CLEAN 
FLOORS or- THE PENSE 
FORESTS FOUNP BV THE 
PILGRIMS PROVIPEP LIM- 
ITED POOP FOR PEER. 
SUBSEQUENT CLEARING 
OR PARTIAL CumNG OF 
THE FORESTS ACTUALIY 
INCREASE!? PEER POPU- 
LATIONS. € m 

3fc#£ 



^OPAY'S LARGER NUMBERS 
OF PEER ARE MATCHEP By 
MORE PEER HUNTERS. BUT 
THE WARY BUCK IS STILL 
AN ELUSIVE CREATURE J ANP 
ONLY THE SEASONEP HllNT- 
ER.WITH THE RIGHT EQUIP- 
MENT, HAS A FAIR CHANCE 
OF BRINGING HOME VENISON. 





X 



f3lNCE MOST HUNTING 
OCCURS WITHIN A MILE OR 
50 OF THE ROAPW/WS.PEER 
MOVE PEEPER INTO THE 
WOOES. THE WISE HUNTER 1 * 
THEN.EQUIPPEP WITH A 
REMINGTON MODEL 700 
RIFLE, ANP WILLING TO 
PROBE FARTHER FROM 
THE ROAPSJSMORE 
LIKELY TO BE SUCCESS- 
FUL. 



Managers, Coaches Needed 

The Walton-Verona area needs man- 
agers and coaches for the Knothole 
baseball terns. There are more boys 
wanting to play every year, with only 
four or five men willing to manage. 

The "A" league, "D" major and 
minor need managers, and the minor 
has enough boys fof possibly three 
teams. 

If you arc interested, contact Lloyd 
Poore, 485-7196, or George Anderson, 
485-7361, for more information. 



Lung Cancer 

The lung cancer death rate among 
men increased 15-fold in 35 years and 
the rate is going up among women. 
Lung cancer is largely preventable, 
says the American Cancer Society — 
just stop smoking. 

"To what do you owe your extra- 
ordinary success?" the company's top 
house-to-house salesman was asked. 
"To the first five words I utter when 
a woman opens the door," he replied. 
"Miss, % your mother in?" 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 

SAMPLES SHOWN IN THE HOME 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED & INSURED! 
ACOUSTIC CEILINGS INSTALLED 

M.SIMPSON - 341-7555 



Peoples-Liberty Bank & Trust Company 



Covington 



Kentucky 



We Make Loans On Home Appliances, Televisions, 
F. H. A. and Mortgages! 



HELP WANTED 



Positions open for Cooks, Kitchen Help, Dishwashers, 
and Porters. Top wages and fringe benefits All 
shifts available. Apply in person to — 



BORON STOP 338 



1-75 b 338 



RICHWOOD, KY. 



ATTENTION N. F. 0. MEMBERS 

Sales Every Other Wednesday. Sale dates as Follows: 
March 3rd, 17th and 31st. 

List Your Production In Advance by Notifying 
Your Collection Point Representative: 

Boone County— George Boh 371-5994 

Grant County— Donald Conrad 824-6551 

Campbell County— Bruce Trapp 635-5129 

Kenton County— George Boeh 3 56-6278 



Lunsford Trucking-Blackfopping Service 

NO DRIVEWAY OR PARKING LOT TOO SMALL 

OR TOO URGE! BLACKTOP REPAIR! 

HI-LOADER AND DUMP TRUCK WORK, 

BACK FILLING, GRADING, ETC. 

WAYNE LUNSFORD 

MORNING VIEW, KY. 356-7527 - 359-4667 



Mmt^ 



Thursday, March 4, 1971 



Wdlton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



R. Wagner Not So Well 

We were informed this week in a 
note from* Mrs. Randall Wagner that 
Randall had not been felling well. It 
seems he is suffering from reactions 
and side effects of the chemo-therapy 
and has also had an infection. How- 
ever, the third round of treatments 
is expected to begin soon, and im- 
provement in his condition has been 
noted. 

Randall has nearty reached the 500 
mark in cards and letters since going 
to Houston, and this is greatly ap- 
preciated by both he and his wife. 

Don't forget the address: Randall 
Wagner, M. A. Anderson Hospital, 
Houstofr, Texas 77025. 

LEGAL NOTICE . . . 

According to Kentucky Statutes gov- 
erning such matters, we will sell at 
our place of business at 134 North 
Main Street, Walton, Kentucky, one 
1959 Rambler station wagon, serial 
number A28346, said sale to be held 
Monday, March 22, 1971 at 10:00 a. 
m., to satisfy charges for repairs bills 
and storage. 

BARTH MOTORS 
3t-8c Franklin Barth 



Walton Methodist Church 
Plans Revival March 21-28 

The Walton United Methodist 
Church is planning a revival, begin- 
ning Sunday, March 21 at the 11:00 
a. m. service and continuing through 
the evening service on March 28. 

The evangelist will be Rev. Jimmy 
Rose of Wilmore, Ky., and the song 
leader will be Phillip Brooks. 

Covington IRS To Stay 

We were informed last Saturday by 
Senator John Sherman Cooper that 
neither the Treasury Department «^r 
the Internal Revenue Service has any 
plans whatsoever for terminating the 
operations of the Covington Service 
Center of the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice. 

Beware the Quack 

Beware of unfounded claims and 
unproven method of cancer treatment, 
says the American Cancer Society. 
Sure "cures" and "remedies" for can- 
cer may prevent or delay proper life 
saving treatment. 

To take a great weight off your 
mind try discarding your halo. 




Does the going seem a little easier 
lately? Better check. You just might 
be going down hill. 

CARD OF THANKS— 

We want to thank all our friends 
for the beautiful flowers, cards and 
gifts that have been sent to us while 
we have been in the hospital. A 
special thanks to our minister, Paul 
Ransford, and members of Brucewood 
for the special prayer services, and to 
all the other ministers of churches in 
Northern Kentucky that have offered 
prayer in our behalf. It is wonderful 
to have friends and we have felt your 
prayers and concerns. An extra special 
thanks to Mother and Jim for looking 
after our boys, and to Steve, Gary 
and Tim for their help also. God 
bless all of you. 
lt-9* Randall & Patsy Wagner 




Henc one il» 9*wi& |ccA pucet 



Ground Beef 



Ground fresh In Store 



4 Pounds 
or More 



LB. 



59c 



Vac-Pak Wieners 



BLUE GRASS 
Full Pound Pkg. 



59c 



(HUNK PINEAPPLE, White Villa 20-oz. size 3 for $1.00 

PRUNE JUKE, White Villa .'. 32-oz. size 39c 

(RUSHED PINEAPPLE, White Villa 20-oz. size 3 for $1.00 

DARK KIDNEY BEANS, White Villa 20-oz. size 17c 



Tomatoes 



Extra Standard 

HONEY GROVE 

Large 28-Oz. Size 



29c 



SLICED PINEAPPLE, White Villa 20-oz. size 3 for $1.00 

THROWN OLIVES, White Villa No. Vh size 39c 

PINK. SALMON, Honey Grove Vi flat size 53c 

BONELESS PIG FEET, White Yilla.. = v14-oz. size 69c 

(HILI POWDER, White Villa M-oz. size 25c 



BUNS 



COUNTY FAIR 

I 

Round 12-Pak or 
Long 10-Pak 



341.00 



7-Up 



12-Oz. Carton of 8 
SAVE 23c 

Plus Bottle Deposit 



69c 



FRUITS & VEGETABLES 



APPLES 



Cello 4-Lb. Bag 
SAVE 20c 



59c 



FREE DELIVERY ON ORDERS OF $3.00 OR MORE 



Model 




Store 



FREE Delivery Every Morning — Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 
Two Deliveries On Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 6:00 p. m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
OPEN 7:30 a. m., CLOSE 8:00 p. m., Friday and Saturday 



Phone 485-4991 



Walton, Kentucky 



«* 



Dying Is Easy 




Some people drink to forget; others are just look- 
ing for a good time. But if you drink and drive, 
you could get a whole lot more than you bar- 
gained for. 



REALLY WORTH ALt THAT? 



the real trick 
is staying alive 




REMEMBER, YOU'RE A LONG TIME DEAD! 

This is a public service announcement by the Kentucky State Police. 



Church League 
Basketball Results 

In the first game Saturday night, 
St. Cecilia defeated the Methodists, 
75-64. Heuser led the winners with 19 
points, while Heusman and Powers 
added 14 each. Lloyd Poore led the 
losers with 24 points and Yates added 
19. 

In the second game, the Church of 
Christ defeated St. Patrick, 94-57. 
Humphries led the winners with 24, 
Sebastian chipped in 20. Meier was 
tops for St. Patrick with 21, and 
Saalfeld added 17. 

In the third game, Walton Christ- 
ian defeated the Baptists, 95-84. Rick 
Stephens and Charles Holder led the 
winners with 29 and 28 points, re- 
spectively. Ron Brown and Jim Bill 
Noe were tops for the losers with 24 
and 23. 

In the last game, All Saints won 
out of time as Piner won, 87-84. Jeff 
Cook and Tom Cornelius shared the 
scoring honors for Piner with 23 
each. Mike Wethington led All Saints 
with 33 and Tom Code added 20. 

This Saturday at 6:00, St. Patrick 
plays Walton Methodist; at 7:30, 
Hickory Grove goes against the New 
Bethel Baptist, and at 9:00, Walton 
Baptist play St. Cecilia. 

Cancer of the Larynx 

Cancer of the larynx strikes more 
men than women. With early diag- 
nosis and treatment the survival rate 
continues to Improve, according to the 
American Cancer Society. 

A man who was widly enthusiastic 
about his vacation trip was driving a- 
long at a rapd clip. Finally, his wife 
consulted a map and informed him 
they were lost. "What's the differ- 
ence?" he asked, "We're making great 
time." 



-DEATHS 



CHARLES A. DRISCOLL 

Charles A. Driscall, 59, of 614 In- 
dependence Station Road, Indepen- 
dence, died Wednesday, eb. 24 at his 
home? 

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Dixie 
Driscoll; a son, Charles Driscoll, Jr., 
and a daughter, Mrs. Dixie Kramer, 
both at home; a brother, Allison Dris- 
coll, and two sisters, Miss Sarah Dris- 
coll and Mrs. Ann Poole, all of Cin- 
cinnati. 

Services were held at 10:00 a. m., 
last Saturday in the Swindler Funeral 
Home, Independence. 2 Burial was in 
Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. 



MRS, ELIZABETH TTTTPiqj, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Martha Littrell, 77, 
of 610 Callant Road, Independence, 
died at 10:45 p. m., Wednesday, Feb. 
24, at St. Elizabeth Hospital after a 
five-months illness. 

She retired in 1959 from the Mos- 
ler Safe & Lock Co., then in Coving- 
ton. 

Survivors include three daughters, 
Mrs. Agnes Breeden of Ludlow, Mrs. 
Minnie Potts of Taylor Mill, and 
Mrs. Lu Denhart of Cincinnati; two 
sons, George Littrell of Baylor Mill, 
and Charles Littrell of Independence, 
and a brother, John Donathan of Ew- 
ing, Ky. 

Services were held at 11:30 a. m. r 
last Saturday at Jones, Ludlow. 



CARLISLE'S 9«e£KIDS 



THEIR HOUSE WAS COLO, 
TIU.TWEY GOT WISE, < 
THEY HEAT A S THEY 

ECONOMIZE f^WE 
SWEAR 



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now. 



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A -MocJernly-Equipped Weekly Newspaper — Letter Press and Offset Printing Phone: 485-4962 
Serving A Progressive Community — Boone, Kenton, Grant £r Gallatin Counties jq c q ^ 



Subscription: $3.15 Per Year 



WALTON, KENTUCKY — THURSDAY, MARfcR 11, 1971 



Volume 56 - Number 10 



Conner Wins District 
Basketball Crown 

Conner High School of Hebron, 
turned in its third straight upset last 
Saturday night to win the 33rd Dis- 
trict Basketball Tournament at Boone 
County High, Florence, by defeating 
Dixie Heights, 87-86. 

Earlier, Conner downed Simon Ken- 
ton, 79-76, and St. Henry, 51-50. 

Conner 79, Simon Kenton 76 

A lot of "firsts" were recorded on 
Monday night of last week when 
Conner High ousted Simon Kenton 
in the opening round of the 33rd 
District Tournament at Boone County 
High, Florence. 

The Cougars pulled off the first 
upset of district tournament play in 
the state by tipping over the Pioneers, 
who had been picked by more than 
a handful to win the district meet. 

Second, Conner, which won just 
five of 21 regular season games, won 
a district toumey game in its very 
first try. 

And third, freshman Ricky Hicks 
came through with a performance he 
will probably remember when he is 
a senior. Hicks, who wasn't even a 
starter in the opening part of the sea- 
son, scored 22 points in the game, in- 
cluding several key baskets in the final 
period when Simon Kenton made a 
desperate try to pull the game out of 
the fire, but to no avail. 

Aside from Hicks, Mavity scored 20 
points for the winners, while Hemp- 
fling and Buckler had 12 each. For 
the losing Pioneers, Leistner had 18 
points, Halderman 16, Davis 12, Rust 
11, and Haines 10. 

Walton-Verona 55, Lloyd 52 

Walton-Verona eliminated Erlanger 
Moyd, 55-52, in the 33rd District 
Tourney, Tuesday night of last week, 
on the Boone County floor. 

Walton, after trailing at the end of 
the first half, moved ahead to stay in 
the third period with 18 points, and 
then held off the Juggernauts in a 
defensive fourth period. 

The winners placed three players in 
double figures as Ron Huffman led 
the way with 18 points. Mike Fergu- 
son added 11 and Gary Ingram 10. 
Larry Kalker and Steve Iker were the 
big guns for Lloyd with 15 points 
each. 

Dixie Heights 60, WaltonV-erona 59 

A field goal by Ken Taglauer with 
nine seconds left to play enabled Dixie 
Heights to defeat Walton- Verona, 60- 
59, last Friday night in District tour- 
ney play at Boone County. 

It market the second straight night 
that the winner was decided in the 
final seconds of play. Thursday, Greg 
Judge hit a fielder with four seconds 
left to give Conner High a victory 
over St. Henry. 

In a game that saw the score tied 
twice and the lead changing hands 
six times in the. first period, Walton- 
Verona held a 17-15 edge. Most of 
the second period was a repitition of 
the first with the score being tied at 
three intervals. Walton held its big- 
gest lead of the game, 30-24, wifli two 
minutes left in the half, but Dixie 
rallied to cut the lead to 36-35 at the 
intermission. 

In the third period, the Colonels 
moved out in front, 48-46. However, 
Goldsberry accounted for seven points 
for W-V in the final period to give 
them a 59-58 edge and set the stage 
for Taglauer's game-winning shot. 

Rick Fischer led Dixie with 24 big 
points, while Bob Messmer had 13 
and Gary Ingram 12 for the losers. 
Mike Ferguson also added 10 to the 
Bearcat cause, while Frye had 11 for 
the Colonels. 

To Show Film On Drugs 

The Independence Lions Club will 
show a film on drugs, Tuesday, March 
30, at 7:30 p. m., in the Community 
Fire House, ' Independence. 

Following the film on drugs, an- 
other film will be shown on "What 
the Lions Can Do In Regard to Keep- 
ing Your Eyesight or Restoring Your 
Eyesight." 

These films will run about 20 min- 
utes each, and the public is invited. 
O 

Walton Masons to Meet 

Walton Lodge, No. 719, F&AM, 
will hold its regular monthly business 
meeting on Thursday, March 18, at 
7:00 p. m. 

There will also be work in the FC 
degree. All members are urged to be 
present, and visitors are welcome. 

Refreshments will be served. 



To Speak at Walton Revival 




Rev. Jimniie Rose 

The Walton United Methodist 
Church has scheduled a special series 
of evangelistic services for the week 
beginning Sunday, March 21, at 11:00 
a. m., and continuing through the fol- 
lowing Sunday — March 28. 

Speaker for these services will be 
Rev. Jimmie Rose, of Wilmore, Ky., 
an approved evangelist of the United 
Methodist Church. 

Rev. Rose is a native of Olive Hill, 
Ky., and has pastored churches in 
Kentucky and Florida. He holds de- 
grees from Morehead State University, 
and has attended Asbury Seminary and 
Chandler School of Theology in Ga. 

Before entering the ministry, Jimmie 
was a high school basketball coach, 
taking his team to the state tourna- 
ment as the youngest coach to achieve 
this feat. 

Rev. and Mrs. Rose are the parents 
of one son and a daughter. 

Phillip Brooks will be assisting in 
the song service with special music. 

Pastor Robert Yates cordially in- 
vites the* people of this community to 
attend these and all servicesxjrf the 
church. You are welcome! 

Verona Softball League 

The Verona Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment is starting a new softball league 
w^th games being played at the Ve- 
rona ball park. 

There will be a meeting March 29 
at 8:30 p. m., in the Verona fire- 
house, Highway 491, Verona. 

For information, call Roy Strong, 
485-7158. 

Sign-Up Dates For 
1971 Feed Grain 

Farmers who -eheese to participate 
in the 1971 farm programs will have 
an acreage set aside in each program 
they sign up for — 20 percent of their 
feed grain base and 75 percent of 
their wheat allotment. The sign-up 
period is from March 1 through April 
9, according to J. Lassing Huey, ASC 
Committee Chairman, Boone County. 

These set aside percentages have 
been established by the USDA. Under 
the new farm programs, participants 
will make their setasides, maintain 
their farms' conserving base and be 
free to use the rest of their cropland 
as they choose, except for crops under 
marketing quota or other controls. 

The ASC Chairman pointed out 
that for the first time, allotments and 
bases for a farm do no dictate to a 
farmer the number of acres he is al- 
lowed to plant to a specific crop. Al- 
lotment and bases are used to figure 
the set-aside acreage and price-support 
payments, not to limit production of 
any one crop. 

The 20 percent set-aside require- 
ment for feed grain established a pre- 
liminary payment of 32 cents per 
bushel for com times the yield estab- 
lished for the farm times one-half the 
corn base. 

« Payments to participating feed grain 
producers will begin as soon as pos- 
sible after July 1. For further infor- 
mation, call 586-6175. 
i i ' ' 

BEECHGROVE PTA 

The Beechgrove Elementary School 
PTA will meet Thursday, March 18 
at 8:00 p. nj * .in the school. Prior to 
the meeting, at 7:00 p. m., the fac- 
ulty and PTA Board members will 
participate in a volley ball game, open 
to the public. 

Catherine Kunkel of the Kenton 
County Mental Health Association, is 
to speak on drugs. 

Refreshments will be served follow- 
ing the meeting. Everyone is invited 
to attend. 



Primary Vote On 
New Boone Jail 

Boone Countians will vote in the; 
May primary on a bond issue for the 
construction of a new county office! 
building to house a jail and police' 
headquarters. 

Boone Fiscal Court agreed last week ' 
to place the issue on the ballot after J 
receiving an estimate of $555,000 to 
build the three-story building from ; 
Covington architect Carl Bankemper. ; 

Voters will be asked to approve a! 
tax increase not to exceed two cents j 
per $100. It will take 25 years to re- r 
tire the bond issue. 

Bankemper submitted plans for the 
three floors and basement of the. 
structure. The first floor would house 
the Police Department, including of-; 
fices, a crime lab, juvenile office, lob-' 
by, records room and radio room. The. 
county police are now housed in a 
frame building in Burlington. 

No definite plans were made for the, 
second floor. The area to be left open 
for future needs. 

The jail would occupy the entire 
third floor, which would include a 
kitchen and separate cells for men,' 
women and juveniles. Two jail breaks 
at the present structure in Burlington, 
caused officials to agree a new jail was 
needed. 

4-H Style Show | 
And Horse Clinic 

The Boone County 4-H Equestrians 
are to hold a style show and horse 
clinic at 1:00 p. m., Sunday, March 
14, at the Burlington School. 

The style show will feature Walking 
Horse, Western, Hunt, English and 
Roadster riding apparel. Used riding 
clothes and equipment will also bc^ 
sold by the 4-H members. 

Demonstrations and talks are on the 
agenda in reference to the five divis- 
ions listed above. 

Numerous prizes will be gfven, and 
the participants need not be present 
to win. 

The public is welcome, as an inter- 
esting program has been planned which 
will appeal to all horse lovers. 

Club members participating in the 
event are: Butch Beecraft, Greg Bee- 
craft, Myla Bias, Victor Carlson, 
Rhonda Easterday, Sharon Easterday, 
Kathy Easton, Linda Easton, Cheri 
Eckstein, Curt England, Roy Fletcher, 
Charlotte Fraysur, Jocelyn Gamble, 
v Diane Gerdis, Joanne Goebel, Char- 
lene Hempfling, Jody Gabbard, Kim 
Hubbard, Patrick Kelly, Anita Law- 
rence, Kim Louden, Karen Louden, 
Randy Louden, IoanLucas, Judy Lucas, 
Amy McClure, Todd Stephenson, Pam 
Tanner,, and Cindy Wamdorf, as well 
as the club leaders, Mrs. Nona Lucas 
and Bill Goebel.— Myla Bias 

PLAN TRICYCLE RACE 

Yes, a tricycle race, and between 
the teachers yet. This will be one of 
the events of the Olympic Games at 
the White's Tower Elementary School 
PTA on Monday, March 15, at 7:30 
p. m., in the Simon Kenton High 
School gym. 

There will be a volleyball game be- 
tween the teachers and parents, and 
games in which the school children 
will participate. ' 

Tickets are 75 cents of adults and 
50 cents for children, and may be 
purchased at White's Tower School 
before the event, or at the door of 
Simon Kenton the evening of the 
event. 

An enjoyable evening is promised, 
and the public is invited. 

Kenton Elementary PTA 

The regular meeting of the Kenton 
Elementary PTA will be held March 
18 at 8:00 p. m. in the school gym. 

A program on "Safety," including 
a film is planned, and winners of the 
Safety Poster Contest will be announc- 
ed. 

The fifth and sixth grade cheer- 
leaders will also be introduced and 
given awards. 

ART EXHIBIT AWARD 

Miss Margie Moore, 18, a Simon 
Kenton High School senior, won an 
honorable mention award in Scholastic 
Art Exhibit at Shillito's. 

She has been a student in the Wil- 
liam Gebhart Art School, and plans 
to continue there following graduation 
in June. 

She is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Moore, 6684 Frontier 
Drive, Independence. 



WORLD DAY OF PRAYER 

A World Day 6i Prayer service was 
conducted Friday evening at the Wal- 
ton United Methodist Church. 

Dr. Robert Anderson of Covington, 
delivered the principal address, and 
members of the CWF of the Walton 
Christian Church who participated 
were: 

Mrs. Jack Rouse, Mrs. Charles 
Adams, Mrs. Jack Berkshire, Mrs. 
Luther Stephens, and Mrs. A. J. Rus- 
sell. Solos were sung by Mrs. Freda 
Barton and Jack Rouse, accompanied 
by Mrs. Lucile Hudson on the organ. 

Refreshments were served by the 
Methodist WSCS to the large number 
in attendance. 

It Is Grass Fire 
Time Says Chief 

Walton Fire Chief, "Chick" Wor- 
th ington states that we are now in 
that "dangerous" time for grass fires. 
There are some people who find it 
necessary to burn with an open flamjg, 
especially farmers in preparation of to- 
bacco beds. However, there are some 
simple rules to follow which helps to 
prevent the spread of grass fires: 

1 — Never leave a fire unattended. 
Stay with it until every spark is out; 

2 — Keep the fire on tobacco beds 
to a minimum. Don't burn too large 
an area at one time; 

3— Keep some equipment on- hand 
to prevent a rapid spread of a blaze 
if it should get out of bounds; 

4 — When burning trash in an out- 
side container, use a screen cover to 
prevent sparks from blowing out; 

5 — Use the ashtray, of your auto or 
truck to discard matches and cigar- 
ettes — don't throw them out of the 
window. 

"Take a few simple precautions and 
prevent out r of-hand fires. Help save 
property and lives. An 6'Unce of pre- 
vention is better than a pound of 
cure," Worthington concluded. 

HOME ON FURLOUGH 




Boone County DAR 
Chapter Has Meeting 

The February, meeting of the Boone 
County Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, was held at 
Heritage House, Florence, with Mes- 
dames Wallace K. Grubbs, Reuben 
Conner, Deane Poore, Robert Wood- 
ward and Joseph Eubanks as co- 
hostesses. 

Mrs. Francis J. Sayre, Regent, led 
the DAR Ritual and welcomed those 
present. 

Mrs. Joseph Eubanks, the program 
chairman, introduced the guest speak- 
er, George Toadvine, principal of the 
Boone County High School, whose 
subject was, "Spanish Influence of 
American History." He said Columbus 
was here 100 years before the Pilgrims, 
Ponce De Leon was in Florida, De 
Soto discovered the Mississippi River, 
and that St. Augustine, Fla. is called 
the Spanish "Plymouth Rock" of Am- 
erica. Many missions were founded 
by the Spanish from Florida to Texas 
to California. In New Mexico, Span- 
ish is spoken and considered correct 
in the State Legislature. 

Mr. Toadvine said the Spanish are 
most expressive of emotions and are 
very courteous. He reminded those 
present to look and think and they 
would find there is a real Spanish 
Heritage in the United States. 

Mrs. Davis Gaines presented Good 
Citizen pins to girls chosen by their 
respective schools — Boone County 
High, Walton-Verona High and Con- 
ner High. > 

Mrs. Helen Collins presented these 
medals to the boys chosen as Good 
Citizens — Boone County High, Con- 
ner High, and Walton-Verona High. 

Mrs. Sayre will attend the coming 
annual DAR State Conference, and 
Mrs. Ashlin Logan was named official 
delegate, with alternates, Mesdames 
Clifford Coyle, Davis Gaines, Joseph 
Eubanks and Floyd Roberts. 

Miss Donna Sayre was welcomed as 
a new member. She is a Hospital Ap- 
prentice at the Naval Training Center 
at Great Lakes, 111. 

Members attending were: Mesdames 
Francis Sayre, Roy Nestor, Helen Col- 
lins, Davis Gaines, Howard Jarrell, 
David Clore, Bernard Scott, Clifford 
Coyle, Joseph Eubanks, Donald Cole- 
man, and Miss Donna Sayre. 

Guests were: Mr. and Mrs. George 
Toadvine, Misses Laura Rogers, Diana 
Sue Johns, and Darlene Berkemeier, 
Rick Palmiter, Ronald Huffman, and 
Lee McNeely, and their mothers. 

1971 Conservation 



A/lc Charles A. Robinson 

A/lc Charles A. Robinson is home 
on a 30-day furlough before going to 
Cam Rahn Bay, Vietnam. He is a 
member of the Air Force Security 
Police. 

Charles and his wife, Cherry, were 
living in Las Vegas, Nev., while he 
was stationed at Nellis Air Fore Base. 

Both are graduates of Simon Ken- 
ton High School, class of 1969. 

Charles is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard Robinson, Rich Road, Morn- 
ing View, and Cherry is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Howard A. Peebles, 
also of Rich Road, Morning View. 

Northern Students Honored 

Two Northern Kentucky State Col- 
lege freshmen, Gayle Hoffman and 
Patti Wagner, both of Erlanger, were 
honored at the Saturday, February 27 
meeting of the Anthropologists and 
Sociologists of Kentucky at Thomas 
More College. 

Their combined effort, a paper en- 
titled "Marijuana-Considered Danger- 
ous?" won the Undergraduate Student 
Award given annualy by that society. 

New Haven PTA To Meet 

The New Haven PTA will meet on 
Monday, March 15, at 7:30^. m., in 
the school cafeteria. 

The program will be, "Children's 
Emotional Health." Do we expect too 
much of our children? 

All parents are urged to attend. 

Senior Dance On Friday 

The senior class of Walton-Verona 
High School is sponsoring a dance on 
Friday, March 12, from 7:30 to 11:30' 
p. m. The music will be furnished by 
"The Organization." Admission will 
be $1.00 each. 



Cost-Sharing Plan 

Approval of some conservation cost- 
sharing practices under the 1971 Rural" 
Environmental Assistance Program 
have now been authorized, according 
to Mose L. Black, Chairman of the 
Kenton County ASC Committee. 

He reported that development of 
the 1971 county program for REAP 
is still in progress but that pending 
final determinations, authorization had 
been given for the County ASC Com- 
mittee to approve certain kinds of 
conservation practices. 

Practices under the 1971 REAP 
which can now be approved include 
those through which farmers would 
establish or improve permanent veg- 
etative cover, plant trees or shrubs^ 
improve stands of forest trees, or build 
water impoundment reservoirs. 

The County ASC Committee is 
consulting with leaders and other in- 
terested persons in developing a total 
REAP investment plan for Kenton 
County. The committee hopes to an- 
nounce a complete program in the 
near future— <me that would benefit 
everyone in the area through its em- 
phasis on improving the environment 
and helping reduce agriculture's con- 
tribution to deterioration of natural 
resources. 

■■ ■■ ■ i ■ h i 

Robert Noelker to Speak at 
Kenton County Council PTA 

Dr. Robert Noelker of the Compre- 
hensive Care Center, will be the guest 
speaker at the Kenton County Council 
PTA meeting, Monday, 10:00 a. m., 
at the Willard Wade YMCA, Cov- 
ington. 

Final plans for the May Art Exhibit 
and Coney Island Day, sponsored by 
the council will be discussed. An elec- 
tion of officers will also be held. 

Mrs. Raymond Evans, president, 
urges all local units to bring their 
publicity books to the meeting for 
judging.—- Pub. Chm. 



Police Attend Driver 
Clinic For Pointers 

Ever heard of the prognant pause? 
Probably, there's no better way of de- 
scribing the reaction of some 55 
motorists who, while attending one of 
the state's remedial clinics for prob- 
lem drivers in Frankfort recently, 
learned that seven of their classmates 
were policemen, and an eighth was a 
policeman's secretary. All of which 
led one startled driver to query, "How 
about that?" 

But, explained Roger L. Wilhoite, 
director of the Public Safety Depart- 
ment's Driver Licensing Division, the 
officers weren't really there because of 
any personal driving difficulties, they 
were th«re to get a first-hand look at 
the state's driver improvement clinic 
program. 

Fayette County Police Chief Wm. 
G. Sellers told the class that Ken- 
tucky's Driver Improvcmbent Clinics 
were among the finest programs in the 
country. 

FRUIT & VEGETABLE 
PRODUCERS TO MEET 

According to William T. Straw, 
Kenton County Extension Agent in 
Agriculture, fruit and vegetable pro- 
ducers will meet in the Independence 
Courthouse, this month, with meet- 
ings starting at 7:30 p. m. 

Thursday,. March 11, "The Home 
Fruit Orchard," associated topics in- 
cluding new varieties, disease and in- 
sect control and ecology, pruning, fer- 
tilizing and color slides of good fruit 
practices. 

Tuesday, March 16, "The Home 
Vegetable Garden," associated topics 
to include new varieties, fertility, di- 
seases and insects, and protecting the 
environment. 

You are invited to attend. 

50th Wedding Anniversary 

It will be golden wedding bells on 
March 21st for Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
E. Brady of Morning View. They 
were married in Latonia, and Mr. 
Brady operated grocery stores in the 
Morning View area for many years. 
He is now retired. 

Their nieces will hold a reception in 
their honor from 2:00 to 4:00 p. m., 
March 21, at- the Morning View 
Methodist Church. 

■i-Si - i 

Bishop To Speak 
At Pleasant Grove 

Sunday, March 14 will be a joyful 
occasion for the congregation and fri- 
ends of Pleasant Grove United Meth- 
odist Church, Ryland Heights, when 
Bishop Roy H. Short, resident Bishop 
of the Louisville Area, The United 
Methodist Church, will deliver the 
sermon and dedicate the new sanctu- 
ary at the 11:00 a. m. worship service. 
He will be assisted by Dr. Charles S. 
Perry, Superintendent of the Coving- 
ton District, and Rev. J. B. Harmon, 
pastor. Included in the service will be 
the burning of the mortgage. 

The new church building replaces a 
frame structure erected on the same 
site approximately eighty years ago. 
Prior to that time the church was lo- 
cated on Mills Road, Kenton County. 

Ground for_ ihe new bud d ing was 
broken~Jiiiy 23, 1967, with Dr. H. L. 
Moore, District Superintendent, offic- 
iating at the ceremonies. The first 
service in the new building was held 
on March 3, 1968. 

Those who served on the binlding 
committee were: Harold Buxton, chair- 
man; Mrs. I. I. Cortright, Grant Di- 
bert, Finley Isaacs, Jr., Wendell Jack- 
son, Edwin Miller, Mrs. T. S. Mof- 
fett, John A. Rich and Fred Welzel. 

Former members and friends are 
cordially invited. — Vincent F. Hartfe 



Walton OES To Meet 

Walton Chapter, No. 161, OES, 
will hold its regular monthly business 
meeting on Monday. March 1 5, at 
7:30 -p. m. All members arc urged to 
be present, and visitors are welcome. 

Refreshments will be served. 



Completes A. F. Training 




Airman Michael Wade 

Airman Michael Wade, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Eugene Wade, 640 Willow 
Drive, Independence, has completed 
basic training at Lackland AFB in 
Texas. He has been assigned to Kees- 
ler AFB, Miss., for training in com- 
munications electronics systems. Air- 
man Fade was a 1969 graduate of 
Simon Kenton High School. 



Thursday, March 11, 1971 



Walton Advertiser, Walton, Kentucky 



WALTON ADVERTISER 

(Established In 1914) _^ 

Walton Advertiser, Published Weekly at 186 North Main Street, Walton, 
Kentucky 41094 - Second Class Postage Paid at Walton, Kentucky 



Malcolm F. Simpson 
James W. Lawrence 
Mrs. Betty Lawrence 



Editor & Publisher 

Assistant Editor 

Society Editor 



Subscription Rate* Is $3.15 Per Year In Advance (Kentucky Tax Included). 
Local Advertising Rate, 60c Per Column Inch. Foreign Rate, 6c Per Line. 



Miss Jean Chambers is still on the 
sick list. 

Joey Hicks spent his first weekend 
with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lebus Stephenson. 

Mrs. Nancy Lawson spent the week- 
end with her daughter, Mrs. Buddy 
Arnold, and family of Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Jones and 
daughter, Evelyn, of Hilliard, Ohio, 
spent the weekend with relatives and 
friends in Walton. 




Celebrates Second Birthday 

Little Miss Anna Marie Demjey cel- 
ebrated her second birthday Thursday, 
February 2?th. 

Those who helped her celebrate 
were her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Way- 
ne Penney- her grandparents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Horn, and her great- 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Everett 
Bickers. 

Mrs. Viola Roberts is now a patient 
at Woodspoint Nursing Home, Flor- 
ence. 
r Little Andra Gouge spent the week- 
end here with her grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Andy Penn. 

Mrs. Dan Bedinger has been on 
the sick list for five weeks. 

The young people and guests of 
the Walton Christian Church enjoyed 
a swimming party at the YMCA in 
Florence, Saturday night. 

Fred Jones was able to leave the 
Veterans Hospital, for the weekend, 
and hopes to be released this week. 



Mrs: Fannie Adams has returned to 
her home after an illness of several 
weeks at St. Elizabeth Hospital and 
at the home of her son, Wayne 
Adams. 

Paul Ramsey of South Main Street, 
is a patient- in St. Elizabeth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodtow Greene 
spent Sunday afternoon with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. George Henry, of 
Warsaw. Mr. Henry is recuperating 
from surgery. 

Woodrow Greene attended a school 
banquet with his grandson, Randy 
Ellis, last Tuesday evening at Holiday 
Inn, Covington. 

Mrs. Vera Wright and Mrs. Grace 
Knox attended* the funeral of Mrs. 
Knox's sister-in-law, Mrs. William 
Kemper, of Warsaw, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Gault, III, of 
UK, and Miss Donna Carnella, Wash- 
ington, D. C, also a student at UK, 
were guests of Johnny's grandparents, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Gault, on Sunday 
afternoon. 



NEARLY NEW 6- room brick ranch with full base- 
ment, 2 baths, and